Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

World

Swedish court overturns ban on e-cigarettes

-

A Swedish court on Wednesday overturned an earlier judicial decision banning the sale of e-cigarettes.

The Supreme Administrative Court ruled that e-cigarettes are not medical products, and therefore the National Drug Agency could not oppose its sale.

"To be a medical product, it must have the ability prevent or treat a disease and, therefore, provide a beneficial effect on human health," the court's ruling read.

The e-cigarettes "do not contain instructions on how they could be used to reduce the consumption of cigarettes or nicotine addiction," according to the court.

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat up a liquid containing nicotine and artificial flavouring. The vapour is inhaled -- "vaped" -- and exhaled, much like a cigarette.

In the last few years, health experts and watchdogs have been embroiled in debate as to whether the gadgets, often not strictly regulated, are safe.

They can also be used with nicotine-free liquids, but some fear e-cigarettes could be a gateway to "real" cigarettes for teenagers.

Regulations concerning e-cigarette are changing rapidly and vary widely throughout Europe.

Portugal does not restrict the use of e-cigarettes, but heavily taxes them. In Switzerland, the e-cigarette is banned if it contains nicotine.

France has the largest market in Europe, with nearly three million "vapoteurs".

A Swedish court on Wednesday overturned an earlier judicial decision banning the sale of e-cigarettes.

The Supreme Administrative Court ruled that e-cigarettes are not medical products, and therefore the National Drug Agency could not oppose its sale.

“To be a medical product, it must have the ability prevent or treat a disease and, therefore, provide a beneficial effect on human health,” the court’s ruling read.

The e-cigarettes “do not contain instructions on how they could be used to reduce the consumption of cigarettes or nicotine addiction,” according to the court.

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat up a liquid containing nicotine and artificial flavouring. The vapour is inhaled — “vaped” — and exhaled, much like a cigarette.

In the last few years, health experts and watchdogs have been embroiled in debate as to whether the gadgets, often not strictly regulated, are safe.

They can also be used with nicotine-free liquids, but some fear e-cigarettes could be a gateway to “real” cigarettes for teenagers.

Regulations concerning e-cigarette are changing rapidly and vary widely throughout Europe.

Portugal does not restrict the use of e-cigarettes, but heavily taxes them. In Switzerland, the e-cigarette is banned if it contains nicotine.

France has the largest market in Europe, with nearly three million “vapoteurs”.

AFP
Written By

With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

You may also like:

Entertainment

Emmy-nominated actor Justin Hartley is chasing ghosts in the new episode titled "Aurora" on '"Tracker" on CBS.

Business

The electric car maker, which enjoyed scorching growth for most of 2022 and 2023, has experienced setbacks.

Business

A calendar marking the days day trippers have to pay entry fees - Copyright AFP GABRIEL BOUYSGildas LE ROUXVenice will this week begin charging...

World

The UK risks a major showdown with the Council of Europe - Copyright AFP Sam YehEurope’s highest rights body on Tuesday called on Britain...