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Amazon accused of not policing knockoffs, faulty products

According to the Daily Dot investigation, products sold by third parties that have received highly negative ratings or comments have remained for sale for months or years. This is significant, as the Amazon Marketplace accounts for about 40 percent of all of Amazon’s sales, a number that could easily rise given its recent earnings report.

The most infamous faulty item in the Marketplace is probably a charger for iPods. The charger’s product page insists it is not affiliated with Apple, but is branded as an Apple product at the top of the page. User reviews have described the chargers as likely to overheat, melt, or sometimes not even arrive. One faulty charger was responsible for the death of 23-year-old Ma Ailun.

The Daily Dot bought one of the chargers to verify the accusations, and found that the model they purchased quickly began to melt.

There are also several other instances of this type of things happening, like:
-Johnson & Johnson removing several of its products from Amazon because it claimed the company wasn’t doing enough to prevent contaminated versions of its products from being sold

Accusations by NaturalNews.com that the site was serving as a front for counterfeit dietary supplement sales

-A report by CBS that showed some 20,000 fake InStyle hair straightening irons were sold through Amazon

The Daily Dot points out that Amazon relies heavily on users flagging offensive content. Amazon has not responded to the Daily Dot’s allegations.

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