Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
    Log in with Twitter

Research News

Scientists find Zika antibodies in step toward vaccine

Washington - US researchers have identified antibodies in lab mice that may be able to prevent infection with the mosquito-borne Zika virus, in what they described Wednesday as a "significant step" toward a vaccine.

Missing MH370 wreckage may be further north, study suggests

Paris - Just days after authorities mooted suspending the ocean search for missing flight MH370, researchers suggested on Wednesday that the debris zone may stretch a further 500 kilometres (310 miles) north.

Olympic travelers face tiny risk of Zika: U.S. study

Miami - Those traveling to Brazil for the Olympics face a tiny risk of getting infected with the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which can cause birth defects in pregnant women, US researchers said Monday.

Last month was hottest June on record: US scientists

Washington - Last month was the hottest June in modern history, marking the 14th consecutive month that global heat records have been broken, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Tuesday.

Scientists find new stubby-armed dinosaur in Argentina

Buenos Aires - Researchers announced they have discovered a ferocious meat-eating dinosaur in Argentina, notable for having short arms like the T-rex but hailing from a different branch of the family tree.

Research shows we touch our cell phones 2,617 times per day

It sometimes seems as if our phones function like an extra limb on our bodies and now, research demonstrates exactly how attached to the devices we really are.

Thumb suckers less prone to allergies: New Zealand study

Wellington - Infants who suck their thumbs or bite their nails appear less prone to allergies as adults, New Zealand researchers have found.

Malaria vaccine loses effectiveness over several years: study

Washington - An experimental vaccine against malaria known as Mosquirix -- or RTS,S -- weakens over time and is only about four percent effective over a seven-year span, researchers said Wednesday.

'Abnormal is the new normal': May breaks another global heat record

Washington - Last month was the hottest May in modern history, marking the 13th consecutive month that global temperature records have been shattered, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday.

U.S., Russia cutting nuke arsenals, but modernising: Study

Stockholm - The world's biggest nuclear powers, the US and Russia, are slowly reducing their nuclear arsenals but are modernising their capacities, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) said on Monday.

Scientists turn CO2 into stone to fight climate change

Washington - Scientists have turned carbon dioxide into stone in a matter of months by pumping it deep underground, offering a revolutionary new way of storing the greenhouse gas to tackle climate change.

Chicago police use algorithm to combat gun violence

Washington - The Chicago police department is using a unique algorithm in its battle against armed violence, to figure out who is most likely to be involved in a shooting, either as a victim or perpetrator.

Scientists find a new treatment to slow down Alzheimer's Disease

A team of German, Swedish and Italian researchers from Örebro University found a new strategy to slow down Alzheimer's Disease (AD) progression. They tried an old drug (clopidogrel) to test out a new therapeutic strategy.

Toy 'arms race' turning Lego violent: Study

Wellington - Lego products are becoming increasingly violent as toymakers engage in an "arms race" to retain children's attention in the digital age, New Zealand researchers said Monday.

April breaks heat records, 12th month in a row for global heat

Miami - Last month was the hottest April in modern history, marking the 12th consecutive month that global heat records have been shattered, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday.

Unique Swedish study tests drugs to prevent child sex abuse

Stockholm - "No one would choose this, it's obvious," said Anders who has unwanted sexual thoughts about children.He is at the forefront of a unique scientific study under way in Sweden to see if drugs can prevent paedophiles from acting on their urges.

Bacteria hampers mosquitoes' ability to spread Zika: study

Miami - A bacterium known as Wolbachia, which is fairly common in insects, can reduce mosquitoes' ability to spread the Zika virus, researchers said Wednesday.

New study shows chocolate or cocoa may boost athletic performance

A British study performed at Kingston University showed that eating dark chocolate and cocoa may improve athletic performance and help during fitness training. Chocolate and cocoa are already known to have a positive effect on cardiovascular health.

U.S. health authorities confirm Zika causes birth defects

Miami - The mosquito-borne Zika virus causes birth defects, including a syndrome in which babies are born with unusually small heads, US health authorities confirmed Wednesday after months of debate and uncertainty.

Rio's Zika outbreak matches Asian virus, researchers say

Miami - The mosquito-borne Zika virus behind last year's outbreak in Rio de Janeiro closely resembles another strain from Asia and may have been introduced by Pacific Island athletes, researchers said Tuesday.

Chinese scientists engineering human embryos defy ethics again?

For the second time in one year, a team of Chinese researchers engineered human embryos by altering their genome with partially successful results. The world's scientific community is concerned about potential ethical issues.

New front opens in war on superbugs: Experts

Amsterdam - A newly-discovered antibiotic-resistant gene is threatening to open a new front in the war against superbugs by rendering a last-resort drug impotent, experts warn.

Earth could become hotter than thought, study warns

Washington - Global warming could make the planet far hotter than currently projected because today's scientific models do not correctly account for the influence of clouds, researchers said this week.

New stem cell therapy may regenerate lost limbs in a few years

A groundbreaking discovery from an Australian research team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) may pave the road for the future of stem cell technology. Thanks to this new research humans may regrow their lost limbs in just a few years.

Military spending rises again in 2015

Stockholm - Rising tensions worldwide helped push up military expenditure in 2015, the first increase after four years of declining spending, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) said in a report published on Tuesday.

Waist size 'strongly predicts' heart disease risk: study

Miami - A study involving people with diabetes has shown that belly size is a stronger predictor of a dangerous kind of heart disease than body mass index, researchers said Saturday.

Disgraced celebrity surgeon's spoiled dreams of fame

Stockholm - Dreams of fame and fortune turned into a nightmare for a once-renowned Italian surgeon who compared himself to Doctor Frankenstein and now stands accused of using patients as guinea pigs.

Do psychological studies have an inherent problem?

Scientific studies are often well-designed and the results stand the test of time. But not always. One area with a great deal of uncertainty is psychology and a new review has found many studies are not reproducible.

How much the environment can affect our IQ? New study sheds light

Can experience and education actually increase our IQ or is it all genetics? New research may have found an answer to the "nature vs nurture" debate, showing that the effects of environmental interventions may increase it, but not permanently.

Lab-grown milk, eggs and meat could hit store shelves in 5 years

Meat, eggs and milk could be produced in lab without killing or harming animals thanks to microbe cultures. The future of food as we know it may be forever changed, allowing even vegetarians and vegans to eat hamburgers and milkshakes again.
  1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 16 Next»

Set up a news alert for

Research


Research Image

Tucker heads to work
Tucker heads to work
Screen Capture
Feel free to download and review the data found in this FDA chart. Draw your own conclusions and eng...
Feel free to download and review the data found in this FDA chart. Draw your own conclusions and engage in the debate.
Kirsch I, Deacon B, Huedo-Medina T, Scoboria A, Moore T, Johnson B
Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 2005: Situation in South Plaquemines Parish  Louisiana near Empire  B...
Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 2005: Situation in South Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana near Empire, Buras and Boothville, United States of America. Photo taken: Aug. 30, 2005.
Crew of the NOAA Gulfstream IV
Entrance to the Medical Center at Duke University  Durham  NC
Entrance to the Medical Center at Duke University, Durham, NC
Bluedog423
On January 31  1961  a Mercury-Redstone launch from Cape Canaveral carried the chimpanzee  Ham  over...
On January 31, 1961, a Mercury-Redstone launch from Cape Canaveral carried the chimpanzee "Ham" over 640 kilometers (400 mi) down range in an arching trajectory that reached a peak of 254 kilometers (158 mi) above the Earth.
NASA
A mouse being used for research/science purposes
A mouse being used for research/science purposes
by diabetesisfun
Poster from a Canadian science campaign
Poster from a Canadian science campaign
With permission by Reuters / Chris Wattie
A baby baboon safely rests on his mothers back as she forages for food for both of them.
A baby baboon safely rests on his mothers back as she forages for food for both of them.
Wikipedia
Simplified version of National Hurricane Center s Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale chart.
Simplified version of National Hurricane Center's Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale chart.
NOAA
Animal rights activists around the world want science to cease experimenting on animals including pr...
Animal rights activists around the world want science to cease experimenting on animals including primates like this one found in laboratories across the country.
PETA
Gooseneck barnacles
Gooseneck barnacles
J Gibbons
Mouse embryonic stem cells
Mouse embryonic stem cells
ChongDae-National Science Foundation employee
Orca whale
Orca whale
Minette Layne
Funding for MS Treatment Clinical Trials - April 5  2011 - Winnipeg  Manitoba
Funding for MS Treatment Clinical Trials - April 5, 2011 - Winnipeg, Manitoba
ChrisD.ca
Tucker trying to pick up the scent of whale scat.
Tucker trying to pick up the scent of whale scat.
Screen Capture
Microbes
Microbes
Serendigity
A primate undergoing experimentation at Covance in Vienna Virginia who were fined for violations of ...
A primate undergoing experimentation at Covance in Vienna Virginia who were fined for violations of the Animal Welfare Act following a PETA investigation that exposed the horrors and cruelty.
PETA
Nearly 300-year-old  Shakespeare forgery  WAS written by Bard himself.
Nearly 300-year-old 'Shakespeare forgery' WAS written by Bard himself.
Timothy Lee
Untitled
ICR
Untitled
Cancer Research