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Biology News

Essential Science: Methylene Blue as an anti-aging treatment

Aging is inevitable for living organisms and part of the course of life. With modern medicine life expectancy can be extended and there are various ‘tricks’ to give the appearance of not aging. But is true slowing down of aging possible?

Optical tweezers designed to control cell behavior

A pair of optical tweezers has been developed, designed to control the behavior of cells for scientific study. Using the technology, cells can be microscopically altered in relation to position, orientation, and shape.

3D printed ovaries produce mice pups

Many biologists see 3D printing as a suitable technology for producing human tissues and organs, creating life-saving and health-enhancing biological constructs. In a breakthrough, a science groups have produced fully-working mice ovaries.

Nanoscience of the invisible butterfly revealed

Fribourg - The Mexican butterfly is able to make itself invisible to predators. Biologists have known that this has something to do with wing color, but the precise mechanism has always been uncertain.

The secret of glow-in-the-dark mushrooms

Moscow - There are mushrooms that appear magical, due to their ability to glow-in-the-dark rather than hallucinogenic properties. The American Association for the Advancement of Science has got to the bottom of how this process works.

Fossils point to life on Earth 4 billion years ago

Paris - The oldest fossils ever found are "direct evidence" of life on Earth 3.8 to 4.3 billion years ago when our planet was still in its infancy, researchers reported Wednesday.

Research group are the first to see DNA 'blink'

Scientists from Northwestern University have developed a new imaging technology that is the first to see DNA “blink,” or fluoresce. This is key to understanding the mechanism at play in relation to different diseases.

3D printer set to print human skin

An innovative 3D bioprinter is being prepared to produce human skin, designed for medical research purposes (such as the testing out of new drugs). This skin may also be adequate for transplanting to patients.

Harry Potter inspires naming of new crab species

A new species of crab has been named after characters from the Harry Potter franchise. In addition part of the name of the crustacean references a famous biologist.

How stress on the brain triggers heart attacks

Scientists have confirmed the link between stress, a region of the brain and heart attacks. The research shows why stress can sometimes lead to a heart attack.

Population of chimpanzees fashion drinking sticks

A population of chimpanzees in the Ivory Coast have been observed fashioning tools to use as drinking sticks. The findings provide further evidence about different subcultures within chimpanzee populations.

Urbanization makes its mark on evolution

Washington - Urbanization, that is human development in the form of towns and cities, is affecting evolution, according to a new scientific study. The researchers say this has implications for sustainability and human well-being.

Some viruses have evolved to affect men more greatly than women

London - Is man-flu real? New evidence suggests that some viruses cause weaker symptoms in women than in men. The reason is evolutionary, based on helping the virus to spread between hosts.

Fight over revolutionary genetic advance goes to court in US

Alexandria - A fierce legal battle over the patent for a revolutionary gene-editing technique played out Tuesday in a US court, with billions of dollars at stake.

Genetics reveals my some people have 'wild hair'

Berlin - Struggling with unmanageable hair? Struggling with hair that won't style or comb? The various states of uncomfortable hair have been attributed, in new scientific research, to genetics.

Humanity decimating planetary wildlife

Paris - Nearly three-fifths of all animals with a backbone -- fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals -- have been wiped out since 1970 by human appetites and activity, according to a grim study released Thursday.

Belgium establishes a global brain bank

Antwerp - A brain bank, a grisly sounding collection of brains and tissues, has been established in Belgium, with parts of the collection being shipped from the U.K. The idea is to provide tissue and medical records to researchers all over the world.

New device for growing replacement lungs

The idea of developing artificial lungs for organ donation remains a goal for the medical establishment, given that a high proportion of people die due to the scarcity of available lungs. A new technique brings this closer.

Essential Science: New types of microbial life in the oceans

The seas and oceans of the world make up the majority of the surface and less is known about life in the oceans compared with the surface of the moon. New research has revealed the mysteries of oceanic microbial life.

U.S. scientists hope prehistoric fish can solve modern problem

Chicago - A giant prehistoric fish once thought to be extinct could be the solution to the worsening invasion of non-native Asian carp that is choking U.S. rivers and crowding out local species.

Essential Science: How science can improve craft beer

Taking a sip of a cold beer on a warm day seems a step away from science. However, both microbiology and chemistry are crucial to creating your favorite brew. With the popularity of craft beers, the scientific approach is important.

Is CRISPR technology set to change biological science?

Gene editing technology is seemingly the most important scientific method to emerge in recent years. The primary method is called CRISPR and it is transforming the field of biology.

Study of Neanderthal Y chromosome hints at fertility problems

Washington - The first examination of a long-extinct Neanderthal's Y chromosome suggests that fertility problems may have prevented Neanderthal men from successfully mating with modern human females, researchers said.

Creator of popular XKCD comics to work on high school textbook

Randall Munroe is the creator of the popular webcomic XKCD, and he recently published a book that got the attention of editors at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which also happens to be Munroe's publisher.

Biologists still don't know where baby eels are made

There are lots of eels in the world. Despite being widespread and found in plentiful numbers, biologists still have no idea how eels mate in natural surroundings or how and where baby eels are born.

Stress wakes up the sleeping herpes virus

Helsinki - Once someone has contracted herpes the virus can emerge again at any time. The re-emergence is linked with periods of stress. Scientists have been looking into how this happens.

Remarkable cancer treatment announced

Medical scientists have reported on a remarkable cancer treatment. Terminally ill patients, suffering with blood cancer, have become symptom-free following treatment with modified cells.

Solving the evolutionary puzzle of menopause

Paris - Menopause in women and females from a few other "higher" species is probably a fluke of nature rather than evolution at work, according to a study published Wednesday.

Sexual rebellion and murder among the bees

Paris - Scientists revealed Wednesday the trigger that can plunge a colony of obedient and sterile worker bees dutifully serving their queen into a chaotic swarm of sexual rebellion and regicide.

Britain's best-loved insect revealed

London - To mark the end of biology week in the U.K., and after several rounds of intense voting, the most popular insect in the U.K. has been revealed: the buff-tailed bumblebee.
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Bees swarm and attack in large numbers  some are more aggressive than others.
Bees swarm and attack in large numbers, some are more aggressive than others.
alan taylor
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Photo by: Dr. David Midgley Cultures: Dr. David Midgley University of Sydney, Australia