http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/99444

New Book Blames Liberal Left for 9-11

Posted Jan 25, 2007 by Mac
The new book by Dinesh D'Souza offers a startling theory about the rise of Muslim anger - it's all about the Liberal Left!
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(Article by Mac)
Writer Dinesh D'Souza has an interesting take on radical Islam. He thinks it is the fault of the left. In his new book, The Enemy Within: The Cultural Left and Its Responsibility for 9/11, he argues that the left bears responsiblity for feuling the fire that is Islamofascism.
D'Souza is careful to make a strong distinction between moderate Muslims and their more radical, violence-hungry brothers. Political theorists have wavered between two basic reasons for Islam's fury with the West:
The first theory cites the inability of the Muslim mind to condone our notions of freedom and democracy - since individual freedom is antithetical to their virtue of submission to Islam, they believe the West is evil.
The second theory believes it is exclusively our foreign policy - especially as it involves Israel - that fuel the anger.
D'Souza asserts that although there a bits of truth to both theories, neither takes into account that which he surmises to be the true problem: liberalism. He believes that years of the political left, liberally biases western media, pop culture, sexually charged song lyrics, Hollywood, etc. have all contributed to the breakdown of traditional values in the West. The Muslim world sees this breakdown as evidence of Western weakness and overall contributions to the evils of the world. They have been incensed by the West's efforts to advance secularism in substitution for Christian/Judeo values and systems previously in place.
He explores some specific examples of the ways in which the changing moral landscape in the West has deeply offended not only Muslim culture but other more traditional cultures around the world. D'Souze suggests that if the conservative right could convince radical Islam that it is "on their side" and interested in bringing back traditional values, a bridge could be formed and anger lessened. But he says that the conservative right first needs to win the war against liberal ideology.
D'Souza takes his argument further, in citing ways in which the liberal left wages an active campaign to bring secular ideas into traditional parts of the world. He gives the left's ideas about redefining the ideas of marriage, traditional family, and sexual behavior as examples. According to his theory, the increasing anger felt by Muslims - who as they watched western pop culture and liberal politics make their way into Muslim countries felt themselves assaulted by the disintegrating morals in the West - culminated in the 9-11 attacks.
Souza's book is full of interesting detail, and his arguments are well made. Liberals, while they may be put off by his accusations, may have to agree that changing morals in the West is a problem for traditional societies who see their youth lured by Western culture and technology. At the same time, Conservatives may be put off by D'Souza's suggestion that they need to court the sentiments of the more radical groups in Islam by comparing devotion to traditional values.
But D'Souza is missing the point. Conservative western values will never condone such things as the Qur'anic advocacy of violence to solve conflict, the treatment of women, the torture and murder of "infidels". Do we WANT to appease these radicals? What do we do then with their conviction that Sharia Law belongs in the enclaves they are establishing within Western cities? Do we want to allow Islamic jurisprudence to be applied to Muslims in lieu of secular law? Do we allow theives to have their hands cut off?
In this sense, D'Souza's theory is a bit simplistic and limited in its potential to offer real solutions to the problem of the War of Terror. But his thinking is sound, his connections between facts are fascinating, and he raises some pertinent points for contemplation. Whatever one's political bent - it's a book that will offer insight, and encourage some serious thought from a different angle.