http://www.digitaljournal.com/news/crime/attacks-in-denmark-may-have-been-inspired-by-magazine-massacre/article/426209

Attacks in Denmark may have been inspired by magazine massacre

Posted Feb 16, 2015 by Nathan Salant
The gunman believed to have shot and killed two people in Denmark on Sunday appears to have been inspired by last month’s attack on the offices of a satirical French magazine and a grocery store in which 17 were slain.
TRIBUTE: Part of a line of flowers left Sunday by mourners outside Copenhagen s Grand Synagogue is s...
TRIBUTE: Part of a line of flowers left Sunday by mourners outside Copenhagen's Grand Synagogue is seen.
Kim Bach/Wikimedia Commons
The gunman believed to have shot and killed two people in Denmark on Sunday appears to have been inspired by last month’s attack on the offices of a satirical French magazine and a grocery store in which 17 were slain.
Authorities investigating the two shooting incidents in Copenhagen said the alleged attacker, who shot a group of people at a free speech event and then fired on security guards at a nearby synagogue, were trying to duplicate the Paris attack.
“We know that there are forces that want to hurt Denmark,” Denmark’s prime minister, Helle Thorning-Schmidt, said Sunday, according to the Associated Press.
“They want to rebuke our freedom of speech,” she said.
The alleged gunman, whose identity still has not been released publicly, killed a filmmaker at an event supporting a controversial Danish cartoonist and then shot three people, one fatally, in a shootout with security guards outside Copenhagen’s Great Synagogue, which was nearby.
The cartoonist, Lars Vilks, has been threatened repeatedly since publishing a series of strips lampooning the prophet Muhammad., the AP said.
Many Muslims consider drawings of Muhammad to be blasphemous.
Denmark’s Jens Mardsen, head of the country’s intelligence agency, said the attack “could have been inspired by the events in Paris.”
France's ambassador to Denmark, Francois Zimeray, who attended the event, said the attack was meant to replicate the Jan. 7 attack in Paris.
Authorities said later that the body of the lone suspect, a 22-year-old man with a history of violence, had been found outside the synagogue.
Vilks, who was not injured, said Sunday that he believed he was the target of the attack on the Danish cultural center, since he is perhaps best known for a 2007 cartoon depicting Muhammad as a dog.
Copenhagen’s chief rabbi, Jair Melchior, said the slain security guard was Dan Uzan, a 27-year-old resident.
The filmmaker, Finn Noergaard, was shot and killed during a panel discussion called “Art, Blasphemy and Freedom of Expression.”
Agnieszka Kolek, another panelist, said she heard shouts of “God is great” in Arabic during the attack.
World leaders including British Prime Minister David Cameron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon condemned the attacks in the Danish capital.
French President Francois Hollande made a visit to Denmark’s embassy in Paris to greet hundreds who had gathered outside in support of victims of the Copenhagen shootings, the AP said.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu also condemned the attack and encouraged European Jews to emigrate to his country.