http://www.digitaljournal.com/news/world/op-ed-effects-of-afghanistan-violence-felt-in-ottawa-canada/article/380901

Op-Ed: Effects of Afghanistan violence felt in Ottawa, Canada

Posted Apr 14, 2014 by Jeffrey Nelson
With all the coverage of violence in the Middle East over the last ten years, it's a wonder if even grabs headlines anymore. Unfortunately, as a society, we have become slightly desensitized to these horrific acts; accepting them as the new normal.
A Chinese soldier jumps through a ring of fire during a tactical training mission in Heihe  northeas...
A Chinese soldier jumps through a ring of fire during a tactical training mission in Heihe, northeast China's Heilongjiang province, March 5, 2014
, AFP/File
That doesn't make it right. The situation in the Middle East augmented by a decade of war in the region has far-reaching effects; it isn't just America or the local populations that suffer.
In light of the recent elections in Afghanistan, which are deemed a success by some, one could feel that progress is being made. However, progress doesn't come without a price. That price can be quite costly being paid with blood and treasure. The latter can be replaced, however the lost lives, limbs, and loved ones can leave holes too big for anything else to fill.
While soldiers readily give up their lives every day for the greater good, their country, their loved ones, or their freedom, soldiers aren't the only ones affected by tragedy. Terrorism in all of it's forms is horrific, and is even more so in these highly violent areas that experience it on a regular basis.
Take, for example, an unfortunate incident that happened in January of 2014; an example of Middle East violence striking the capital of the small, peaceful country of Canada.
When soldiers deploy to a war zone, there is a certain amount of risk expected and associated with such a move. Normally, however, accountants don't kiss their kids good bye and hug their wives extra tight in the morning before heading off to work; at least in the normal scope of what an accountant does.
Unfortunately for Peter McSheffrey and Martin Glazer, as referenced in the article above, their routine audit in Afghanistan would be their last thanks to a suicide bomber deciding to take out his rage on a restaurant full of unsuspecting people.
The president of Samson and Associates, the firm for which the two slain accountants worked, had the following to say on the subject:
“As auditors we’re not on the front (lines) so we don’t usually go where it is very dangerous, but in a case like this the attack was directly in town, so it was not in a danger area. But unfortunately we were there at a bad time.”
While we all understand that terrorism, bombings, ethnic battles, and a myriad of other reasons people senselessly slaughter each other have all existed for thousands of years all over the world, especially in the Middle East, the fact that gasoline has been poured on the fire through years and years of wars cannot be ignored.
It isn't just military lives that are lost, but civilian lives as well. Military lives are certainly worth no less than civilians lives, in fact one could argue they are worth more, but the fact remains: No country, people group, or region comes out unscathed on the other side of such a confrontation.