http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/296100

Sadie Frost talks about depression and marriage in autobiography

Posted Aug 16, 2010 by Lynn Curwin
In her autobiography – Crazy Days- Sadie Frost talk about her battle with depression and about her marriage to Jude Law. The book was the subject of legal action when Law issued a writ demanding that sections about their marriage be removed.
Sadie Frost
Sadie Frost
screen capture from YouTube
The Daily Mail reported that the mention of previous liaisons, information on domestic details and photos of their children all caused him concern. The matter was settled in court and the Mail on Sunday began serialising the autobiography on August 15.
Frost and Law were a couple for six years, after meeting when he was 19 and she was a 25-year-old married woman with a child. She felt guilty, but eventually left her husband, Gary Kemp of Spandau Ballet, and she and Law bought a house together.
In 1996 she found out she was pregnant, but after her son was born she fought depression.
The Daily Mail reported her story of what happened one night: “I watched my hand slowly pick up a pair of scissors. It was as if I was being sucked down lower into the chair and the scissors seemed to be drawn to my arm.
“I appeared to have cut myself. Blood dripped down my arm. There was no sense of panic within me – I just felt empty.”
She was treated for depression and seemed to be doing better until after her daughter was born in 2000.
“Sadly, illness is cruel and that horribly familiar sinking feeling returned - PND (post natal depression) was setting in again. This time I'd convinced myself that it wouldn't be a problem. Illness doesn't listen, though. It seduced me into its cold, dark arms.”
She went on medication again.
It was after their third child was born that the couple split up.
Feeling depressed again, she saw a doctor at a clinic in California who suggested immediate treatment. When Frost said she would see a doctor after she got home, and left the clinic, a man took her by the arm and led her back. She was committed to care for 28 days.
“The psychiatric ward was as bad as I'd imagined: plastic sheets on the bed and bars on the windows,” she said.
After returning to London she was able to find help, and says that she has come to terms with her past.
“I've realised, as a woman and a mother, that depression is not something we like to admit to. The stigma remains: as a mother you are supposed to cope and not admit defeat. What saved me was being able to ask for help and to accept it. It was the best thing to do because as soon as I did, recovery was swift.”