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article imageToxic ash raining down in California? After all, it is 2020

By Karen Graham     Sep 8, 2020 in Environment
As if a global pandemic, record-high temperatures, a raging wildfire, and news of approaching winds weren't bad enough, Los Angeles County residents are being told to stay inside to avoid exposure to potentially toxic ash.
The South Coast Air Quality Management District (South Coast AQMD) and Los Angeles County officials are warning residents of poor air quality caused by smoke and ash from the Bobcat Fire that is still blazing - having burned 8,553 acres at 0 percent containment after breaking out at 12:22 p.m. Sunday near the Cogswell Dam and West Fork Day Use area of the forest.
Not only is the fine ash raining down in the San Gabriel Valley, but in neighborhoods in Glendale, Pico Rivera, Whittier, Santa Monica, and Redondo Beach, according to KTLA5.
"That falling ash doesn’t just look ominous. It may contain toxic chemicals, including some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals such as arsenic or lead, that can be released from burned materials," said Nahal Mogharabi, director of communications for the South Coast AQMD, reports the LA Times.
They are also advising the public to avoid skin contact with the ash and for those people with respiratory problems to stay indoors.
Besides the ash and smoke, and terrible heat that reached into the triple digits in many areas, the National Weather Service is forecasting the Santa Ana winds are forecast to begin blowing through Los Angeles and Ventura counties on Tuesdaqy and Wednesday.
Update on El Dorado Fire
The El Dorado Fire in Southern California's San Bernardino County has scorched 10,574 acres as of Tuesday morning and is only 16 percent contained, according to CNN.
This is the fire that was caused by a "smoke-generating pyrotechnic device" used at a gender-reveal party on Saturday morning in El Dorado Ranch Park in Yucaipa, about 70 miles east of Los Angeles, according to Cal Fire investigators.
More about northern california, toxic ash, Bobcat fire, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arsenic and lead
 
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