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article imageLondon's reorientated conceptual art gallery Special

By Tim Sandle     Apr 10, 2016 in Entertainment
London - London's Tate Modern is one of the biggest and most innovative modern art centers in the world. The exhibit area consists of several large galleries. One is dedicated to conceptual art, and it has recently been revised. Digital Journal paid a visit.
This is the third article in a series looking at how conceptual art is exhibited in London's Tate Modern. The first article looked at citizenship, how it is defined and portrayed. The second part focused on the Fluxus artist Joseph Beuys. This third part take a more eclectic look at some of the most interesting works on display.
A piece of work by the sculptor Barbara Hepworth. This is simply called  Figure  and it is made from...
A piece of work by the sculptor Barbara Hepworth. This is simply called "Figure" and it is made from Elm. It was created between 1959 and 1960.
Conceptual art (or "Conceptualism") is difficult to define. Essentially it is art in which the concept or idea involved in the work takes precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. To the causal onlooker, this means, at first glance, many of the works of art are not aesthetically pleasing and the viewer needs to look harder in order to appreciate the intent of the artist.
A painting by Philip Gutson titled  Monument  from 1976.
A painting by Philip Gutson titled "Monument" from 1976.
The painting shown above is by Philip Guston, an example of the type of work on display. Gutson was a painter and printmaker in the New York School, which included many of the abstract expressionists, such as Jackson Pollock.
More abstract is this painting by Victor Passmore:
Victor Pasmore was a British artist and architect.
Victor Pasmore was a British artist and architect.
The Pasmore work is from 1963. The work is designed to reflect harmony and nature. Pasmore was a leading figure in the promotion of abstract art, from the 1950s through to his death during the 1980s.
Conceptual art emerged as a movement during the 1960s. The influence of the movement is very much around today, being drawn upon by many artists.
A different painting from Lygia Clark, using only monochrome to create abstract form. These forms are designed to convey a three-dimensional structure.
Lygia Clark  Planes on a Modulated Surface  from 1957.
Lygia Clark "Planes on a Modulated Surface" from 1957.
Lygia Clark was a Brazilian artist best known for her painting and installation work.
Arguably the most famous artist on display is Barbara Hepworth. Hepworth (1903 - 1975) was was an English artist and sculptor.
A Barbara Hepworth art work. This is called  Oval Sculpture Number  .  It is formed of plaster and p...
A Barbara Hepworth art work. This is called "Oval Sculpture Number "." It is formed of plaster and placed on a wooden base. It was cast in 1958 and intended to represent an abstract form of the Cornish landscape.
Other three-dimensional objects are on display, such as this by Hélio Oiticica.
Visitors shuffle past a work by Hélio Oiticica. The art is called B11 Box Bólide 09  from 1964.
Visitors shuffle past a work by Hélio Oiticica. The art is called B11 Box Bólide 09, from 1964.
Oiticica was a Brazilian visual artist, best known for his participation in the Neo-Concrete Movement, for his innovative use of color, and for what he later termed "environmental art."
A less interesting item of visual art is Naum Gabo's "Kinetic Construction." This is a vibrating rod inserted into a black box. The artists aim was to convey the fact the sculpture is about both space and time.
Naum Gabo s vibrating sculpture at Tate Modern.
Naum Gabo's vibrating sculpture at Tate Modern.
Naum Gabo was a prominent Russian sculptor in the Constructivism movement.
A different form of visual art is found with Teresa Margolles more recent "Flag", which was made in 2009.
Teresa Margolles   Flag . It is intended to represent  thousands of violent deaths associated with t...
Teresa Margolles' "Flag". It is intended to represent thousands of violent deaths associated with the powerful drug cartels in Mexico.
In some senses, placing the works in the Tate Modern building seems fitting. The building was once the Bankside Power Station and was converted into an art exhibit space during the 1990s. For those interested in conceptual art, it is a key place to visit. The average art gallery goer will be able to make up their own mind about the worth and significance of the displays.
More about conceptual art, Art, Tate modern, London
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