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Robot eases loneliness of Mexican virus patients

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A robot at a hospital in the Mexican capital is providing a lifeline for coronavirus patients separated from their relatives and reducing the risk of infection for medical workers.

"Hi, I'm LaLuchy Robotina! What's your name?" the 1.4-meter-tall (4.6 feet) robot asks patients as it goes from room to room.

The robot has a camera and display screen enabling patients  relatives and doctors to chat
The robot has a camera and display screen enabling patients, relatives and doctors to chat
CLAUDIO CRUZ, AFP

It moves around on wheels and has a camera and display screen enabling relatives and doctors to chat with patients or staff in full protective gear in the coronavirus ward.

"It allows us to have a physical presence... but with zero exposure to aerosols within the Covid-19 area," said Lucia Ledesma, a neuropsychologist at the November 20 National Medical Center.

The hospital robot, part of a global trend aimed at reducing the risk of infection during the pandemic, was even designated as a "co-therapist" for coronavirus patients in July.

It is part of a global trend of using robots to curb the spread of the coronavirus
It is part of a global trend of using robots to curb the spread of the coronavirus
CLAUDIO CRUZ, AFP

Since then, it has carried out around 160 missions with infected patients, their relatives and the mental health team.

It can even make soothing sounds to reduce the stress caused by isolation.

The robot "helps us with the mental health of the patient," said Sandra Munoz, who coordinates the hospital's strategy against the virus, which has killed more than 60,000 people in Mexico.

The robot has computer vision enabling it to recognize people
The robot has computer vision enabling it to recognize people
CLAUDIO CRUZ, AFP

The bot has computer vision enabling it to recognize people and sensors to help it to move around.

It is a lifeline for patients like Rosa Maria Velazquez, one of more than half a million Mexicans who have been infected with the virus.

"As (families) cannot enter, they see us and we see them, and that cheers us all up," the 55-year-old said from her hospital bed.

A robot at a hospital in the Mexican capital is providing a lifeline for coronavirus patients separated from their relatives and reducing the risk of infection for medical workers.

“Hi, I’m LaLuchy Robotina! What’s your name?” the 1.4-meter-tall (4.6 feet) robot asks patients as it goes from room to room.

The robot has a camera and display screen enabling patients  relatives and doctors to chat

The robot has a camera and display screen enabling patients, relatives and doctors to chat
CLAUDIO CRUZ, AFP

It moves around on wheels and has a camera and display screen enabling relatives and doctors to chat with patients or staff in full protective gear in the coronavirus ward.

“It allows us to have a physical presence… but with zero exposure to aerosols within the Covid-19 area,” said Lucia Ledesma, a neuropsychologist at the November 20 National Medical Center.

The hospital robot, part of a global trend aimed at reducing the risk of infection during the pandemic, was even designated as a “co-therapist” for coronavirus patients in July.

It is part of a global trend of using robots to curb the spread of the coronavirus

It is part of a global trend of using robots to curb the spread of the coronavirus
CLAUDIO CRUZ, AFP

Since then, it has carried out around 160 missions with infected patients, their relatives and the mental health team.

It can even make soothing sounds to reduce the stress caused by isolation.

The robot “helps us with the mental health of the patient,” said Sandra Munoz, who coordinates the hospital’s strategy against the virus, which has killed more than 60,000 people in Mexico.

The robot has computer vision enabling it to recognize people

The robot has computer vision enabling it to recognize people
CLAUDIO CRUZ, AFP

The bot has computer vision enabling it to recognize people and sensors to help it to move around.

It is a lifeline for patients like Rosa Maria Velazquez, one of more than half a million Mexicans who have been infected with the virus.

“As (families) cannot enter, they see us and we see them, and that cheers us all up,” the 55-year-old said from her hospital bed.

AFP
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With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

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