Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

World

Over 2,000 migrants break out of city in Southern Mexico, headed to the U.S. border

The migrants began heading west and north toward the U.S. border, pushing past a line of state police who were trying to stop them.

Migrants check out a map of Mexico, deciding on a route north. Source - Wotancito. CC SA 4.0.
Migrants check out a map of Mexico, deciding on a route north. Source - Wotancito. CC SA 4.0.

The over 2,000 migrants, mainly Central Americans, began walking out of Tapachula, Mexico’s main border city with Guatemala on Saturday where they have essentially been trapped. 

The migrants began heading west and north toward the U.S. border, pushing past a line of state police who were trying to stop them. They made it only a few miles, reaching the nearby village of Alvaro Obregon before stopping to rest for the night at a baseball field, reports ABC News.

José Antonio, a migrant from Honduras who did not want to give his last name because he fears it could affect his case, said he had been waiting in Tapachula for two months for an answer on his request for some sort of visa.

“They told me I had to wait because the appointments were full,” said the construction worker, according to NBC News. “There is no work there (in Tapachula), so out of necessity I joined this group.”

Actually, tens of thousands of migrants, from Honduras, El Salvador, and Haiti have been waiting in the southern city of Tapachula for refugee or asylum papers, and the wait has stretched into months for many people.

The march did not include as many Haitian migrants as previous marches, when thousands of them reached the US border around Del Rio, Texas, in September.

In August, Mexican National Guard troops in riot gear blocked several hundred Haitians, Cubans, and Central Americans who set out walking on a highway from Tapachula.

Mexico requires migrants applying for humanitarian visas or asylum to remain in the border state of Chiapas, next to Guatemala, for their cases to be processed. The marches are reminiscent, but nowhere near as large, as the migrant caravans that crossed Mexico in 2018 and 2019.

Written By

Karen Graham is Digital Journal's Editor-at-Large for environmental news. Karen's view of what is happening in our world is colored by her love of history and how the past influences events taking place today. Her belief in man's part in the care of the planet and our environment has led her to focus on the need for action in dealing with climate change. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

You may also like:

Business

View of nitrogen fertilizer being applied to growing corn (maize) in a contoured, no-tilled field in Hardin County, Iowa. Source - USDA/Photo no. NRCSIA99241...

Life

Hanukkah is an eight-day “festival of lights” that takes place during the winter, oftentimes at or around the same time as Christmas.

World

The Democratic Republic of Congo will allow armed forces from neighbouring Uganda to enter its territory to chase rebels.

World

Omicron, first discovered in southern Africa, represents a fresh challenge to global efforts to battle the pandemic.