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Muslims in Australian city challenge hateful stereotypes

The group delivered leaflets to homes in Tasmania to counter the rise of Reclaim Australia and One Nation. One Nation is a right-wing nationalist party, while Reclaim Australia is a loosely structured group that is known for protesting Islam.

Two pamphlets from the Ahmadiyya Muslim community were delivered to homes across Hobart over the holidays. The pamphlets were titled Muslims for Loyalty and Muslims for Peace. One of the pamphlets said that love of one’s country of residence is part of faith and that the Quran is clear on obedience to governmental authority and that it is mandatory.

Doctor Aamir Mahmoud, the president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community (Tasmania), said he hoped this would alter the way people think about Muslims, as well as how they interact with Muslims.

He said people just have to go through with what’s going on in the world. He said there are bad images regarding Muslims that they are not good for their country. He said they want to express from their own deeds, actions and words that whatever others are saying about them, they are wrong.

Mahmoud said a lot of people think Muslims have a personal agenda and this is because of groups such as Reclaim Australia and One Nation. He said when he came to Australia in 2010, many people were afraid to come to him and to speak with him.

He said the message was received positively but the group still has a long way to go. If some people do something wrong, then it shouldn’t relate to every single person, according to Mahmoud.

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