Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

World

Italy won’t ratify EU-Canada trade deal, minister says

-

Italy's far-right agriculture minister on Thursday said his government would not ratify an EU-Canada free trade deal, claiming it does not protect his country's farmers.

The European Union and Canada formally signed the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) in October 2016, at a time when anti-globalisation sentiment was on the rise in Europe.

The accord, which has yet to be ratified, eliminates 98 percent of tariffs between the EU and Canada.

Opponents to the accord from around Europe see it as a danger to health, democracy and the rule of law.

Farmers in Italy protested in 2017, demanding that the government refuse to ratify the pact.

CETA's supporters, however, see it as an extension of the global trade system that faces a threat from protectionist US President Donald Trump.

The global system has also come under attack from eurosceptics and anti-establishment parties like those swept to power in Italy in a March vote.

In an interview published in Italian daily La Stampa on Thursday, Agriculture Minister Gian Marco Centinaio said: "We will not ratify the free-trade agreement with Canada because it only protects a small part of our protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) produce."

He added: "We will ask parliament not to ratify this treaty or others similar to CETA."

Centinaio said the decision was covered in the joint government contract published by the populist coalition government made up of the anti-establishment Five Star Movement and the far-right League

Centinaio, a League member, said that his decision did not reflect just the nationalist position of his party, but that "doubts over this agreement are common among my European colleagues".

Italy’s far-right agriculture minister on Thursday said his government would not ratify an EU-Canada free trade deal, claiming it does not protect his country’s farmers.

The European Union and Canada formally signed the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) in October 2016, at a time when anti-globalisation sentiment was on the rise in Europe.

The accord, which has yet to be ratified, eliminates 98 percent of tariffs between the EU and Canada.

Opponents to the accord from around Europe see it as a danger to health, democracy and the rule of law.

Farmers in Italy protested in 2017, demanding that the government refuse to ratify the pact.

CETA’s supporters, however, see it as an extension of the global trade system that faces a threat from protectionist US President Donald Trump.

The global system has also come under attack from eurosceptics and anti-establishment parties like those swept to power in Italy in a March vote.

In an interview published in Italian daily La Stampa on Thursday, Agriculture Minister Gian Marco Centinaio said: “We will not ratify the free-trade agreement with Canada because it only protects a small part of our protected designation of origin (PDO) and protected geographical indication (PGI) produce.”

He added: “We will ask parliament not to ratify this treaty or others similar to CETA.”

Centinaio said the decision was covered in the joint government contract published by the populist coalition government made up of the anti-establishment Five Star Movement and the far-right League

Centinaio, a League member, said that his decision did not reflect just the nationalist position of his party, but that “doubts over this agreement are common among my European colleagues”.

AFP
Written By

With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

You may also like:

Tech & Science

Artificial intelligence built on mountains of potentially biased information has created a real risk of automating discrimination.

Entertainment

Kevin Costner launches his sprawling self-funded Western and Demi Moore returns in a gore-filled body horror.

World

For a decade, French former childcare worker Sophie Rollet carried out her own, lonely investigation to make Goodyear accountable.

Business

A stranded cargo ship that has been blocking one of America's busiest ports will be removed Monday.