Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

World

German bank caught in DRC colonial land dispute

-

A German state-owned bank has found itself at the centre of a battle in the Democratic Republic of Congo over agricultural land dating back to the Belgian colonial period, AFP learned Monday.

Representatives from nine communities in the DRC last week called on DEG -- a branch of public development bank KfW -- to activate a dispute resolution mechanism over land farmed for palm oil.

They say that palm oil producer PHC, owned by Canada's Feronia, has "illegally stolen" ancestral lands and forests for three plantations and factories, depriving them of "the means to feed and shelter their families," according to a statement by several non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

DEG helped finance PHC's operations in the African country, some of which are on land bought from Anglo-Dutch giant Unilever in 2009 -- including "a portfolio of contested plots with a total surface area of more than 100,000 hectares," the statement said.

The land was part of "a gigantic tract of a million hectares unilaterally granted to British Lord Leverhulme" by Belgian colonial authorities in 1911.

A spokesman for the German bank told AFP "it is to be welcomed" that the plaintiffs have turned to the dispute mechanism it set up with Dutch development bank FMO.

"An international group of independent experts will now rule on whether the request can be heard," he added.

A cross-section of experts on environmental, social, legal and financial questions will offer an opinion within 25 working days.

Feronia's PHC subsidiary employs around 9,000 people in the DRC, but the local plaintiffs say the workers' conditions have worsened since the Canadian firm has been in charge.

Cologne-based DEG finances investments by private companies in developing countries. It plans to issue around 1.7 billion euros ($1.9 billion) in new loans worldwide this year.

A German state-owned bank has found itself at the centre of a battle in the Democratic Republic of Congo over agricultural land dating back to the Belgian colonial period, AFP learned Monday.

Representatives from nine communities in the DRC last week called on DEG — a branch of public development bank KfW — to activate a dispute resolution mechanism over land farmed for palm oil.

They say that palm oil producer PHC, owned by Canada’s Feronia, has “illegally stolen” ancestral lands and forests for three plantations and factories, depriving them of “the means to feed and shelter their families,” according to a statement by several non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

DEG helped finance PHC’s operations in the African country, some of which are on land bought from Anglo-Dutch giant Unilever in 2009 — including “a portfolio of contested plots with a total surface area of more than 100,000 hectares,” the statement said.

The land was part of “a gigantic tract of a million hectares unilaterally granted to British Lord Leverhulme” by Belgian colonial authorities in 1911.

A spokesman for the German bank told AFP “it is to be welcomed” that the plaintiffs have turned to the dispute mechanism it set up with Dutch development bank FMO.

“An international group of independent experts will now rule on whether the request can be heard,” he added.

A cross-section of experts on environmental, social, legal and financial questions will offer an opinion within 25 working days.

Feronia’s PHC subsidiary employs around 9,000 people in the DRC, but the local plaintiffs say the workers’ conditions have worsened since the Canadian firm has been in charge.

Cologne-based DEG finances investments by private companies in developing countries. It plans to issue around 1.7 billion euros ($1.9 billion) in new loans worldwide this year.

Written By

With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

You may also like:

World

The Supreme Court is attempting to undermine the federal regulatory state established by Congress.

World

Rescuers warned Monday that hope of finding survivors was diminishing after an avalanche set off by the collapse of an Italian glacier.

World

The city is still living in slow motion, even though Russian troops withdrew from the outer northern and northeast suburbs three months ago.

Business

This is what’s happening right now, and you’re doing it to yourselves.