Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

World

China's Tencent told to get state approval for new apps: state media

Gaming and messaging giant Tencent has been told all its new apps and updates must be approved by the government.

China antitrust regulator blocks Tencent gaming site merger
Plans for the merger of China's two largest video game live-streaming sites were initially announced by Tencent last October - Copyright AFP/File NOEL CELIS
Plans for the merger of China's two largest video game live-streaming sites were initially announced by Tencent last October - Copyright AFP/File NOEL CELIS

Gaming and messaging giant Tencent has been told all its new apps and updates must be approved by the government, state media reported, as Beijing continues its domestic tech sector crackdown.

The Chinese government has moved to exert more authority over the industry in the past year, citing concerns that tech giants in the country have become too big and powerful.

This latest move against embattled Tencent comes after nine of the group’s apps were found to have committed “violations” since the beginning of the year, prompting the need for “transitional administrative guidance measures”, state media CCTV quoted the government as saying.

The company must submit any new apps or updates for inspection by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology before they can be uploaded or updated.

“After passing inspection, they can then be launched to users as usual,” the ministry said, according to CCTV in a report Wednesday.

Tencent told AFP it would comply with the requirements.

“We are continuously working to enhance user protection features within our apps, and also have regular co-operation with relevant government agencies to ensure regulatory compliance. Our apps remain functional and available for download,” it said.

China’s ruling Communist Party has relied upon success stories like Tencent to push forward a digital transformation in the country, and the biggest domestic apps have hundreds of millions of users.

But Beijing abruptly turned on the sector late last year as concerns mounted over its aggressive expansion and allegations of monopolistic practices and data abuses –- paralleling similar unease with tech firms in the United States and elsewhere.

This month, Tencent reported its slowest revenue growth since 2004.

The government’s crackdown has included measures to dramatically restrict children’s video game playing time and has slowed approvals for new titles in the world’s biggest gaming market.

In September, hundreds of Chinese video game makers, including Tencent, vowed to better police their products for “politically harmful” content and enforce curbs on underage players, as they looked to fall into line with government demands.

Written By

With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

You may also like:

Business

View of nitrogen fertilizer being applied to growing corn (maize) in a contoured, no-tilled field in Hardin County, Iowa. Source - USDA/Photo no. NRCSIA99241...

Life

Hanukkah is an eight-day “festival of lights” that takes place during the winter, oftentimes at or around the same time as Christmas.

World

The Democratic Republic of Congo will allow armed forces from neighbouring Uganda to enter its territory to chase rebels.

World

Omicron, first discovered in southern Africa, represents a fresh challenge to global efforts to battle the pandemic.