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Sexually transmitted diseases are ‘out of control’ in U.S. prompting calls for change

Sharply rising cases of some sexually transmitted diseases are prompting U.S. health officials to call for new prevention and treatment efforts.

Officials are working on new approaches to the rise in STDs in the U.S., including efforts to increase the use of condoms. Credit - Béa on fr.wikipedia, Public Domain
Officials are working on new approaches to the rise in STDs in the U.S., including efforts to increase the use of condoms. Credit - Béa on fr.wikipedia, Public Domain

Sharply rising cases of some sexually transmitted diseases are prompting U.S. health officials to call for new prevention and treatment efforts.

“It is imperative that we … work to rebuild, innovate, and expand (STD) prevention in the U.S.,” said Dr. Leandro Mena of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a speech Monday at a medical conference on sexually transmitted diseases.

There was a 26 percent rise in syphilis cases in 2021 alone – the highest since 1991 and the total number of cases hit its highest since 1948. HIV cases are also on the rise, up 16 percent last year.

Added to these statistics is the international outbreak of monkeypox, which is being spread mainly between men who have sex with other men, which has further highlighted the nation’s worsening problem with diseases spread mostly through sex, reports ABC News.

David Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors, called the situation “out of control.”

Officials are working on finding new ways to address the problem, including home test kits for some STDs that will make it easier for people to learn they are infected and to take steps to prevent spreading it to others, Dr. Mena said.

Another official said a core part of any effort must work to increase the use of condoms.

Electron micrograph of Treponema pallidum. Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis. Image – CDC / Dr. David Cox, Public Domain

“It’s pretty simple. More sexually transmitted infections occur when people are having more unprotected sex,” said Dr. Mike Saag, an infectious disease expert at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Syphilis is a bacterial disease that surfaces as genital sores but can ultimately lead to severe symptoms and death if left untreated. New syphilis infections plummeted in the U.S. starting in the 1940s when antibiotics became widely available.

They fell to their lowest ever by 1998 when only 7,000 cases were reported nationwide. The CDC was so encouraged by the progress it launched a plan to eliminate syphilis in the U.S.

US News is reporting that by 2002 cases began rising again, largely among gay and bisexual men, and they kept going. In late 2013, the CDC ended its elimination campaign in the face of limited funding and escalating cases, which that year surpassed 17,000.

By 2020 cases had reached nearly 41,700 and they spiked even further last year, to more than 52,000.

Rates are highest in men who have sex with men and among Black and Hispanic Americans and Native Americans. 

That ties to another problem — the rise in congenital syphilis, in which infected moms pass the virus on to their babies, potentially leading to the death of the child or health problems like deafness and blindness. Annual congenital syphilis cases numbered only about 300 a decade ago; they surged to nearly 2,700 last year. Of last year’s tally, 211 were stillbirths or infant deaths, Mena said.

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Karen Graham is Digital Journal's Editor-at-Large for environmental news. Karen's view of what is happening in our world is colored by her love of history and how the past influences events taking place today. Her belief in man's part in the care of the planet and our environment has led her to focus on the need for action in dealing with climate change. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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