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I’ve got a city to fly: What do we think of a future with flying cars?

How close are we to flying cars? Relatively so, it would appear…

Vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as this shown in an image released by Wisk Aero LLC could help commuters rise above clogged traffic. — © AFP
Vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as this shown in an image released by Wisk Aero LLC could help commuters rise above clogged traffic. — © AFP

Flying cars, as a concept, have been around since the 1950s – and not simply confined to imaginative tales from science fiction. The lack of a working model has not prevented some scientists from seeking to develop such technologies or from, apparently, some car manufacturers exploring the concept.

A poll reveals that, within the U.S., nearly 3 in 4 people would retake a driving test or get a drone license to operate a flying car. This is according to the new American Muscle study. These findings showed 1 in 2 U.S. citizens are very interested in buying a flying car, however it was also found that nearly half of the population think flying cars will be more dangerous than current cars. This means there are some associated safety concerns to be addressed and overcome.

The key advantages include:

  • Designed to drive on the street,
  • Take off vertically when needed,
  • Fly overhead above traffic,
  • Provide real time and course adjustment data for computer controls.

There are of course some potential disadvantages, including collision concerns and aerial congestion. But for now, let’s consider the future state. Is this once-futuristic fantasy on the brink of being our new reality? If so, what are the general population findings when it comes to flying cars?

Given the safety implications, there is also the question of which brands consumers would want to see manufacture them.

How close are we to flying cars? Relatively so, it would appear. From example, the U.S. FAA recently approved the testing of Alef Automotive’s Model A, unveiling at the Detroit Auto Show.

With pre-orders live and anticipation building, online searches for “flying car” in the U.S. are up by 383 percent in the last month. Overall, 52 percent of U.S. citizens say they are interested in purchasing a flying car — Gen Z is most interested, with 61 percent wanting to own a flying car, while baby boomers are least interested (38 percent).

Geographically, Colorado is the state most interested in flying cars, with 976 searches per 100,000 residents. Florida (804) is the second most interested in flying cars, followed by Washington (741) and Nevada (727) — Minneapolis, Seattle, and Denver are the cities with the most searches.

In terms of the most trusted brands, coming top are: Toyota (43 percent), Tesla (41 percent), Honda (33 percent), BMW (28 percent), and Mercedes-Benz (25 percent). With fuel type, 40 percent would be dissuaded by gas-powered flying cars. In contrast, 58 percent favour electric-powered flying cars and 60 percent welcome hydrogen-fuelled models.

It would appear there is some appetite for established brands one-day creating flying vehicles.

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Written By

Dr. Tim Sandle is Digital Journal's Editor-at-Large for science news. Tim specializes in science, technology, environmental, business, and health journalism. He is additionally a practising microbiologist; and an author. He is also interested in history, politics and current affairs.

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