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Keystone XL pipeline company seeks $15B from U.S. over breach of NAFTA obligations

TC Energy Corporation, the company behind the Keystone XL pipeline project, is seeking to recover more than $15 billion in damages from the U.S.

Keystone XL pipeline company seeks $15B from U.S. over breach of NAFTA obligations
Protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline and Keystone XL Pipeline hold a sit-in in the street next to the San Francisco Federal Building on January 26, 2017. Source - Pax Ahimsa Gethen CC SA 4.0
Protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline and Keystone XL Pipeline hold a sit-in in the street next to the San Francisco Federal Building on January 26, 2017. Source - Pax Ahimsa Gethen CC SA 4.0

TC Energy Corporation, the company behind the Keystone XL pipeline project, is seeking to recover more than $15 billion in damages from the United States, claiming the US government breached its free-trade obligations when it revoked the permit for the project.

TC Energy announced in a Friday press release that it had filed a notice of intent with the State Department’s Office of the Legal Adviser to “initiate a legacy North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) claim under the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement.” 

President Joe Biden, on his first day in office in January, revoked a key permit for the pipeline, and last month, the Canadian-based company announced it was scrapping the project altogether, according to The Hill.

The permit in question was approved by former President Donald Trump during his first months in office. The project – a 1,200-mile pipeline – would have carried oil from Canada to the U.S.

CNN News notes that the news that TC Energy was suing the US government came right before a leaky gas pipeline burst in the Gulf of Mexico, causing a fire in the body of water.

“We’re just not treating [climate change] like the planetary emergency it is,” Emily Atkin, founder of the Heated newsletter and MSNBC contributor, told CNN’s Chief Media Correspondent Brian Stelter on “Reliable Sources” Sunday.

“Right now, everyone should be a climate reporter,” she said. “And if you’re not a climate reporter right now, you will be, whether you realize it or not.”

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Written By

Karen Graham is Digital Journal's Editor-at-Large for environmental news. Karen's view of what is happening in our world is colored by her love of history and how the past influences events taking place today. Her belief in man's part in the care of the planet and our environment has led her to focus on the need for action in dealing with climate change. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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