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Getting ready to ride the next property wave: How to target renovations and improvements

Often, there’s no need to deal with the stress of opting for an extension or loft conversion – you can go a long way upgrading what you’ve already got.

Period house in England. Image by Tim Sandle.
Period house in England. Image by Tim Sandle.

The primary driver within the U.K. economy is through property transactions. Whether this is landlords acquiring properties for rent or homeowners upscaling or downsizing. Data suggests that property prices are rising again, a pattern caused by both historical and recent prices. For those seeking to take advantage of this uplift, one way of maximising the value of property is through modifications and upgrading.

A review of the tendencies of homeowners finds that 50 percent of the UK population planned a home renovation in 2023, with 58 percent opting to redecorate or furnish. This may well grow as a proportion of households given that the increasing borrowing costs have slowed down, with the so-termed “mortgage nightmare” being proclaimed by many economists to be “over”.  

Renovations can vary in size and shape. Digital Journal caught up with the interior and home designers at The Heritage Window Company to discuss some of the underrated and unexpected ways you can add value to a home. 

Kevin Brown, the company’s Managing Director explains the premise: “There are plenty of ways you can upgrade your home to add value without needing to secure planning permission. Often, there’s no need to deal with the stress of opting for an extension or loft conversion – you can go a long way upgrading what you’ve already got, and get a great price for your house in the process.”

First impressions count

It is usually the first part of the home that people see – so unsurprisingly, the front door can is significant when it comes to the valuation of the home. Sometimes, a lick of paint is all it takes; alternatively, investing in a new front door can be a cost-effective way to add value.

Whatever is selected for the front door, it is important to tie this in with the rest of the exterior design. Keeping things simple is important for according to Zillow, a black front door is the optimal one, potentially adding over £5,000 to the property value.

Parking

Another factor that can increase a home’s value is off-street parking. This is particularly important for those who live in a city, where on-street parking is typically scarce or expensive. Homes with a driveway sell for up to 13 percent more than homes without.

Be storage savvy

Storage is essential when it comes to boosting your home’s resale value, and inventive storage solutions are the perfect way to do so. Customised, integrated wardrobes or storage cupboards add value in a couple of ways, maximising your floor space for new interior design possibilities and, of course, reducing clutter.

Taking the next step

In terms of overall design, it is useful to give the impression of build quality, permeance and reliability. A creaky set of stairs will detract from that from the moment you guide a potential buyer upstairs. Investing in a staircase is an underrated way to add value.

Give a warm welcome

Upgrading central heating, especially existing radiator systems in favour of an underfloor heating system is becoming a popular move. An underfloor heating system can add thousands onto a home resale price.

Underfloor heating is typically more efficient than a traditional boiler system and can reduce monthly energy bills.

A window of opportunity?

Replacing your standard uPVC windows with slimline aluminium windows can further increase the value of a home. More durable, stylish and energy efficient than stock uPVC options, aluminium windows should increase the sustainability of a property.

Renovate right

Where the scale of the project is large, opting for a partial renovation could still help bto oost the home’s value.

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Written By

Dr. Tim Sandle is Digital Journal's Editor-at-Large for science news. Tim specializes in science, technology, environmental, business, and health journalism. He is additionally a practising microbiologist; and an author. He is also interested in history, politics and current affairs.

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