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A sustainability kick: Five key eco sports innovations

The core of the skis is made of 100 percent certified poplar wood, and the damping consists of 100 percent natural flax fibre, replacing a carbon sheet.

Alpine skiing typically takes place on a piste at a ski resort. Image by: By Robinseed - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0
Alpine skiing typically takes place on a piste at a ski resort. Image by: By Robinseed - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0

Eco-friendly activewear became popular amongst sports enthusiasts some time ago. Fashioning sports kits made from recycled plastics are actively driving the sustainability movement forwards.

Into 2022, and sports equipment is also seeing a form of ‘sustainability makeover’. The ‘reduce, reuse, recycle’ mantra is starting to become implemented into the production of sports essentials, such as football balls, boxing gloves, and skis.

As examples of what is happening in this field, Digital Journal heard from SIA Austria, a ski instructor academy. Reviewing the information, some of the most key eco sports innovations can be drawn out.

The human power plant

For those who seek a more eco-visit to the gym, SportsArt has launched its ECO-POWR™ technology that aims to revolutionise the way we think about cardio workouts. Its treadmills and cross trainers turn ordinary pieces of equipment into human power plants.

When you work out, up to 74 percent of your energy is converted into clean, renewable energy that goes into powering your facility. That way, the fitness seeker can reduce their carbon footprint and potentially save on their energy bill.

Scout headlamp

Sustainable headlamps have new standards. The Swedish outdoor brand Silva has introduced a new headlamp made from the innovative Revo material, which is made from recycled polymers mixed with hemp plant fibres.

The creation received the renowned ISPO Award in 2022, which recognises innovation in sports products and services. Silva’s Terra Scout headlamp generates up to 90 percent less carbon dioxide emissions during its production compared to standard plastics. In addition, it is durable and light, and each headlamp has its own unique appearance due to the colour of the hemp.

Skiing down the green slope

For the winter outdoor enthusiasts, SCOTT has manufactured skis without compromising performance or sustainability. In winter 2022/2023, SCOTT is launching its Superguide LT 95, ideal for ski touring, and that’s another ISPO Award 2022 winner.

Here the SCOTT team is applying environmentally conscious practices into the manufacturing of its products. The core of the skis is made of 100 percent certified poplar wood, and the damping consists of 100 percent natural flax fibre, replacing a carbon sheet.

Eco balls

Soccer, and volleyball are also getting a sustainability revamp with Waboba’s REWILD eco-friendly series, which features balls made from the jute plant and rubber tree. The brand uses plastic-free shipping materials across its series and 10 percent of proceeds are going towards supporting various initiatives dedicated to protecting and restoring the environment.

Boxing vegan style

Sananbul’s vegan boxing and jiu-jitsu gloves differ from other gloves. Traditional sports gloves are made from animal-based leather, which is an extremely pollutive industry. The production of genuine leather contributes to global warming, water pollution and depletion, and greenhouse-gas emissions more than any other synthetic or plant-based leather.

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Written By

Dr. Tim Sandle is Digital Journal's Editor-at-Large for science news. Tim specializes in science, technology, environmental, business, and health journalism. He is additionally a practising microbiologist; and an author. He is also interested in history, politics and current affairs.

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