Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Business

US regulator orders Boeing inspections over oxygen mask issue

The Federal Aviation Administration is ordering for inspections of more than 2,600 US-registered Boeing 737 planes over an oxygen mask issue
The Federal Aviation Administration is ordering for inspections of more than 2,600 US-registered Boeing 737 planes over an oxygen mask issue - Copyright POOL/AFP/File Jennifer Buchanan
The Federal Aviation Administration is ordering for inspections of more than 2,600 US-registered Boeing 737 planes over an oxygen mask issue - Copyright POOL/AFP/File Jennifer Buchanan

US aviation regulators said Monday that thousands of Boeing 737 airplanes would need to be inspected, amid concerns that passenger oxygen masks could fail in emergencies.

The airworthiness directive by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) comes into effect immediately and affects more than 2,600 US-registered airplanes.

The aim is to ensure that passenger service unit oxygen generators are in the right position on certain Boeing airplanes.

Operators are to check the oxygen generators and “perform corrective actions, if necessary, within 120 to 150 days,” the FAA said in a statement.

It added that the directive was prompted by multiple reports of these generators shifting out of position, and called for a general visual inspection to be conducted.

In response to queries, Boeing said that a new adhesive introduced in August 2019 was found to sometimes allow oxygen generator units to shift from their positions.

In June, Boeing gave operators instructions to update a portion of the restraining straps on 737 oxygen generators.

The company added that it has since gone back to using its original adhesive to ensure that the generators remain in place.

The announcement adds to a series of concerns facing Boeing.

The manufacturer has been grappling with intense scrutiny since a near-catastrophic event in January, when a fuselage panel blew out of an Alaska Airlines-operated 737 MAX.

Earlier on Monday, Boeing said it had reached a deal with the US Department of Justice over two fatal 737 MAX crashes — with court documents indicating that the aviation giant would plead guilty to fraud.

Prosecutors had concluded that Boeing flouted an earlier settlement addressing the disasters, in which 346 people were killed in Ethiopia and Indonesia more than five years ago.

AFP
Written By

With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

You may also like:

Life

On an improvised pitch in war-ravaged Gaza, a young player and goalkeeper block out the boisterous crowd and focus solely on the football as...

Business

Every day in a simple temple in an Indian village, Hindu priest Subhramanya Sharma prays to his god for JD Vance to become vice-president...

Business

Traders are shifting cautiously as they weigh the outlook for US policy post-election.