Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Business

UK probes Microsoft’s $69 bn bid for gaming giant

Britain announced an “in-depth investigation” into Microsoft’s planned $69-billion takeover of US gaming giant Activision Blizzard.

Microsoft in January announced a bid to create the world's third biggest gaming company by revenue by purchasing the owner of hit games "Candy Crush" and "Call Of Duty"
Microsoft in January announced a bid to create the world's third biggest gaming company by revenue by purchasing the owner of hit games "Candy Crush" and "Call Of Duty" - Copyright AFP/File Lionel BONAVENTURE
Microsoft in January announced a bid to create the world's third biggest gaming company by revenue by purchasing the owner of hit games "Candy Crush" and "Call Of Duty" - Copyright AFP/File Lionel BONAVENTURE

Britain on Thursday announced an “in-depth investigation” into Microsoft’s planned $69-billion takeover of US gaming giant Activision Blizzard, citing UK competition concerns.

US technology giant Microsoft in January announced a bid to create the world’s third biggest gaming company by revenue, behind China’s Tencent and Japan’s Sony, by purchasing the owner of hit games “Candy Crush” and “Call Of Duty”.

The proposed deal, already controversial owing to allegations of sexual harassment against women at Activision, now faces a probe by Britain’s Competition and Markets Authority.

“The CMA has referred the anticipated acquisition by Microsoft Corporation of Activision Blizzard, Inc. for an in-depth investigation,” a statement said.

It added that the “merger may be expected to result in a substantial lessening of competition within a market or markets in the United Kingdom”.

Activision Blizzard’s portfolio also includes the popular game “World Of Warcraft”.

Sorcha O’Carroll, senior director of mergers at the CMA, previously expressed concern that Microsoft could use its control over Call Of Duty and World Of Warcraft “to harm rivals, including recent and future rivals in multi-game subscription services and cloud gaming”.

Sony has expressed concerns that Call of Duty might no longer be accessible on its PlayStation console.

Microsoft dismissed such a suggestion, however, saying in a statement Thursday that “it makes zero business sense… to remove Call of Duty from PlayStation given its market leading console position”.

AFP
Written By

With 2,400 staff representing 100 different nationalities, AFP covers the world as a leading global news agency. AFP provides fast, comprehensive and verified coverage of the issues affecting our daily lives.

You may also like:

Business

A new phishing campaign uses HTML attachments that abuse the Windows search protocol.

World

Too little has been done for too long. This may well be the first instalment of the payoff.

World

The most expensive city was found to be London, followed by Amsterdam, Chicago, Oslo and Edinburgh.

World

Moscow has intensified attacks in the eastern Donetsk region - Copyright AFP/File Ted ALJIBELéa Dauple and Mykola ZavgorodniyVolodymyr Zelensky, a 66-year-old namesake of the...