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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Board games, Politics, Technology, Drinks, Travel,   see all» Charity & volunteer work, Environment & green living, Sports, Video games, Books, Health, Food, dining & restaurants, Entertainment, Careers & workplace, Internet, Sexual health, Concerts, General business news & info, Jobs, Men's health, Celebrities, Science & space, Education, Music, Food, recipes, Government, Women's health, Pharmaceuticals, Social media, Movies

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Bringing the health economy together via dentist and dietician

For people with busy lives, visiting dentists, dieticians, medical doctors and so forth means a difficult balancing act. To help with this, Michigan State University have pioneered a test for obesity to be used by dentists.

Nanoparticles created to seek out cancer cells

Moscow - A key application of nanotechnology is in the medical field and one useful application is with the early detection of cancerous cells. Researchers from Russia report on a new innovation.

Ambitious plans for a Mars orbiter announced

The multi-billion-dollar company Lockheed Martin is planning to construct a space station that will orbit Mars. The platform will first be tested around the Moon.

Pharma News: Merck and Boehringer report successes

The company Merck announced strong financial results for the first quarter of 2016, based on increases in sales and earnings. Meanwhile, Boehringer Ingelheim has licensed a cancer drug to Horizon Pharma.

Catching cancer early via new implant

A "cure" for cancer remains elusive. However, methods to detect cancer early and to administer treatment continue to advance. The latest is a new implant designed to spot cancerous cells before they develop into tumours.

Epilepsy and pain management drug connected with birth defects

A medical study says the drug pregabalin, designed to treat epilepsy as well as neuropathic pain, could be linked to an increased risk of birth defects.

Why a mother’s voice soothes her children

The voice of a child’s mother provides psychological comfort and it lowers levels of the stress hormone cortisol, according to new research of school-aged children.

Next-gen carbon monoxide sensors based on nanotech

The monitoring of air, especially in homes and workplaces, for carbon monoxide is a critical part of health and safety. Early detection is key to lowering risks of poisoning. To improve current technology, Japanese researchers are looking to nanotech.

New generation of night vision goggles in development

Sydney - Infrared technology could lead to a step-change in the images formed via night vision goggles and cameras, according to research being carried out in Australia.

Next generation tech needs a diamond at the heart

Diamonds have many useful properties, aside from being prized jewels. One such application is as semiconductors and, as a new application, they could become the basis of a new generation of electronic devices.

New packaging aims to keep vegetables fresher

Michigan State University have developed new packaging designed to help produce stay fresher for longer. The research has run tests on onions and the data collected shows considerable improvement in keeping the vegetables edible.

Suicide risk lifted from Pfizer's smoking-cessation pill

Brussels - Europe's drug regulator has lifted a longstanding warning in relation to a anti-smoking medication made by the company Pfizer.

Arizona allows pharmacists to change prescriptions

Phoenix - Arizona has become the first U.S. state to allow pharmacists to change the medicine prescribed on a doctor’s prescription for a similar drug product. The law requires the patient to be informed.

Waking and sleeping states need a ‘chemical cocktail’

The act of falling asleep and then waking up is more complex, and slightly different, than previously thought, according to new research. The process involves a chemical cocktail.

Why snakes are pale or dark in color explained

A young student has revealed why snakes are paler in the South and darker in the North — that's because darker species absorb heat from the sun more quickly.

Male peacocks twerk to attract hens

A new study, using slow-motion capture photography, has revealed that male peacocks undertake a series of movements, including a move that resembles twerking, it to attract peahens.

Essential Science: Robot insects powered by static electricity

Harvard - Scientists are examining tiny robotic insects in a quest to find new ways to power robotic devices. The basis of the research is to improve the efficiency for search and rescue operations.

New rapid methods for Salmonella detection

Salmonella is a major agent of food-borne illness globally. Researchers are developing a range of new, rapid microbiological methods to speed up detection and to improve the accuracy of the results.

Do cancer cells have special acoustic signals?

A new study suggests that cells have particular acoustic signals, and that the signal from cancerous cells differs from that of healthy cells. This could be the basis of a new cancer detection method.

B. Braun settles tainted syringes lawsuit

The medical device manufacturer B. Braun has paid out $7.8 million to settle a U.S. criminal case in related to faulty syringes. The irony is the company did not make the syringes; however, its brand name was on them.
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