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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Government, Sexual health, Internet, Women's health, Celebrities,   see all» Health, Entertainment, Concerts, Board games, General business news & info, Education, Travel, Charity & volunteer work, Environment & green living, Food, recipes, Science & space, Social media, Technology, Music, Jobs, Video games, Books, Pharmaceuticals, Sports, Drinks, Careers & workplace, Movies, Politics, Food, dining & restaurants, Men's health

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News

Mold risk with oat based breakfast cereals

Scientists have warned that oats and oat products, like breakfast cereals, require closer monitoring for fungal toxins. This comes from a review of U.S. oat products, some of which contain a mold-related toxin called ochratoxin A.

How bedbugs have sex safely

According to a new study, the spongy undersides of female bedbugs protect the insects from painful intercourse. This answers the conundrum as to how the insects reproduce.

Tracking down the U.S. measles outbreak

Genetic tests have not revealed the source of the viral outbreak that started in California’s Disney theme parks. The point of origin remains a mystery.

Bat avoidance tactics of the Luna moth

New research has shown how Luna moths can use their long tails to throw bats off their trail. This avoids them being eaten by the flying predators.

Sea cumbers remain in danger as popularity as food source rises Special

Trade in shark fins has fallen in the past year, according to a new study. This is despite the continuing popularity for shark’s fin soup in China.

Resistant malaria moves closer to India border

Parasites resistant to the antimalarial drug artemisinin are spreading through mosquitoes. A new study shows that mosquitoes carrying these parasites are in Myanmar and are heading to the India border.

Protecting wetlands is of pressing importance Special

Disturbing data suggests that almost two-thirds of the world’s wetlands have been lost over the past 100 years. This has resulted in a loss of freshwater animals and plants.

Plague alert: How agriculture could trigger problems in Africa Special

A warning has been sounded that methods deployed to increase food production in East Africa could increase the risk of plague, possibly to epidemic levels.

Scientists discover how C. diff disrupts the human gut

Scientists have determined how Clostridium difficile causes harm in the guts of animals and people in a relatively short time frame. It is hoped that the findings will help treat severe diarrhea in patients.

Using a probiotic to cure rainbow trout disease

Rainbow trouts are vulnerable to Coldwater Disease, a type of bacterial infection. To combat the disease, researchers have developed a probiotic using bacteria from the trout’s own gut.

Highly processed foods are linked to addictive eating

New research confirms what most people know: highly processed foods, including certain types of chocolate, pizza, burgers and French fries are among the most addictive and trigger an inclination to overeat.

Find out how breastfeeding boosts the immune system

Scientists have demonstrated that breastfeeding, along with other factors, beneficially influences a baby's immune system development. It also reduces susceptibility to allergies and asthma.

Potential antimalarial drug made from algae

Scientists have used algae to produce a malaria parasite protein. When the algae-produced protein is paired with an immune-boosting cocktail, studies showed generated antibodies in mice were able to eliminate a mosquito infection.

Oyster infection rates increase at night

Oysters that reside in shallow waters around the world are prone to a parasitic disease. This is because nutrient pollution there runs high and oxygen levels invariably plummet to zero at night.

The perils of publication, scientist in dispute with journal

Sao Pedro D'aldeia - The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers. This is a rare activity within the science world.

Boosting frog populations by creating aquatic nurseries

A new study suggests that mimicking the rainforest water holes left by peccaries can help boost frog populations and to preserve some endangered species.

Optogenetics pioneer wins award

Washington D.c. - The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health has named Karl Deisseroth the winner of the 2015 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences.

Chocolate candies found to have unsafe levels of metal

San Fransisco - Independent testing has found 62 percent of chocolate products contain levels of lead or cadmium at a level that violates California’s proposition 65 law.

Sleep deprivation revealed from studying blood

Sleep deprivation can now be revealed from an analysis of blood samples. Research shows that circulating fats and acids drop in people who are not getting enough sleep. Why have test? So employers can see if someone is "fit for work."

MERS-CoV found in the Philippines

A nurse returning to the Philippines country from Saudi Arabia has tested positive for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, according to the Filipino Department of Health.
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