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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Celebrities, Drinks, Pharmaceuticals, Men's health, Jobs,   see all» Food, recipes, Movies, Concerts, Environment & green living, Politics, Sports, Board games, Health, Food, dining & restaurants, Women's health, Internet, Science & space, General business news & info, Video games, Social media, Books, Education, Government, Entertainment, Travel, Sexual health, Technology, Charity & volunteer work, Careers & workplace, Music

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New moth species named after President Trump

Having a newly discovered species named after someone is normally a great honor. This distinction has been afforded to the new U.S. president. On a closer review of the characteristics of the moth, the ex-businessman may not be so pleased.

Classic video game console baffles neuroscientists

Researchers have used a classic video game console to try to analyse neural networks. Since looking at the networks in the brain is a highly complex process, the researchers hoped studying an old Atari 2600 system would prove simpler. It didn’t.

Snooker: O’Sullivan wins seventh masters Special

London - Ronnie O’Sullivan has broken another snooker record in winning the Masters title for the seventh time. This win took him above the record he shared with Stephen Hendry. In the final O’Sullivan beat Joe Perry 10-7.

Essential Science: Next pathogenic threats identified

Recent years have been a number of pathogenic threats have hit the headlines, with Ebola being the foremost concern in recent years. Looking to the future, scientists have raised concerns about three viruses that the world now needs to prepare for.

Health group outlines advice for giving up smoking

Toronto - Although smoking tobacco products is in decline in many countries, a sizable minority continue to smoke. To remind smokers about the process of quitting, the Canadian Cancer Society has provided Digital Journal with a nine step plan.

Activist moms group aims to reduce infant mortality

Columbus - A new support group, comprised of activists and moms in Ohio, has been formed to help reduce the rate of infant mortality. The group Moms2B is a seeking to address the social disparities that affect infant death rates and ill-health.

Costco calls for end to bee-killing pesticides

The retail corporation Costco has requested that its suppliers end the use of bee-killing pesticides on garden plants sold in its stores. This is part of a Friends of the Earth initiative.

Project underway to map hospital infection zones

Chicago - To better understand the infection risks to patients a plan has been drawn up to map the microbiome of hospitals. This is on the premise that each hospital carries its own, unique microbial signature.

Prince Charles produces book on climate change

London - Prince Charles, heir to the British crown and head of the Commonwealth, has co-written a book for children and adults on climate change. The book is part of the revamped Ladybird series.

Scanning the brains of infants to predict disabilities

Toronto - A new way of assessing a premature infant’s brain, following birth, can predict whether the child will go onto develop a disability. The research has been empirically tested and there is a high level of predictability.

New saliva test helps with crime scene investigations

Knowing whether a sample of saliva has originated from a man or a woman could prove revolutionary for criminal investigators. A new method, based on Raman spectrophotometry, offers the means to do so.

Bacteria powered battery built on sheet of paper

New York - In the quest to find new and efficient means of generating power a research group have developed a battery, resembling a thin sheet of paper, which is powered by microorganisms.

Food made from mealworms could address world hunger

Is the answer to global hunger and issues of food scarcity consuming insects? If so, can insects be turned into food, through processing, that is recognizable today? One food research group think so.

Psychology explains what retail therapy is all about

When people are unhappy they often go out and buy something in order to make themselves feel better. One of the drivers for this, psychologists report, could be a fundamental unhappiness with personal relationships.

New approach to antidepressant via drug discovery

Helsinki - A new molecule has proved promising in laboratory test in relation to antidepressant therapy. This relates to a better understanding as to how the brain regulates depression and anxiety.

New link between reduced calories and life expectancy

The association between a lower calorie intake and a longer life expectancy has been the subject of research for several years, with data supporting and disproving the link. A new study reports in favor, based on an animal model.

Is social media use affecting sleep patterns?

Cardiff - Obsession with social media is taking its toll, especially among young people. A new report has found one in five young people are making do with less sleep due to social media use; and this sleep deprivation is having an impact.

Wearable sensor aims to flag when you’re getting sick

Smart watches and other wearable technologies are effective at monitoring vital signs and reporting on overall health, but can the technology be developed to actually signal when you might be getting sick? One research group thinks so.

Acupuncture alleviates infantile colic

The thought of acupuncture and babies may make people wince, but a new study suggests that such measures may help to alleviate excessive crying (due to infantile colic).

Tightest material knot ever is achieved

Manchester - Materials scientists have made the most tightly knotted physical structure ever. This feat could lead to a new generation of advanced materials being manufactured.
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