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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Books, Movies, Jobs, Pharmaceuticals, Celebrities,   see all» Video games, Environment & green living, Charity & volunteer work, General business news & info, Food, dining & restaurants, Women's health, Technology, Politics, Sports, Music, Men's health, Concerts, Food, recipes, Entertainment, Government, Education, Careers & workplace, Sexual health, Board games, Travel, Social media, Internet, Drinks, Health, Science & space

News

Ebola cases pass 10,000

Geneva - The number of cases in the Ebola outbreak has today exceeded 10,000, with 4,922 deaths, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO).

Deadly virus is killing frogs throughout Spain

Several frog, toad, newt, and salamander populations are being attacked by an emerging pathogen in a major national park in Spain.

Brain patterns help to detect conciousness

Scientists have identified brain activity patterns that appear to indicate when an unresponsive patient is conscious. The finding helps to characterize brain activity patterns that can identify signs of awareness in seemingly vegetative patients.

U.S. halts research on the word's deadliest pathogens

Washington - Following a series of biosafety errors at federal research facilities, the U.S. government has temporarily halted funding for new studies into serious pathogens like influenza, SARS, and MERS viruses.

Microbes used to detox marine pollutants

Manchester - Many microbes have an ability to "clean up" pollutants. A new study has shown how special cellular chemistry allows microbes to strip pollutants of halogen atoms. The finding could be useful for tackling marine toxins.

First Europeans were lactose intolerant

New research reveals that 5,000 years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

Breast cancer rates lower among Latina women

A genome-wide association study has identified that a specific gene could help explain the relatively low rates of breast cancer among Latina women.

Global tuberculosis cases increase

Geneva - A new study by the World Health Organization indicates that tuberculosis has infected hundreds of thousands more people around the world. The actual figures are far higher than those estimated a year ago.

Can electromagnets 're-program' cells?

Scientists have reported that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming. Not all scientists are convinced.

Keeping rice arsenic free

Scientists have identified a transporter protein in rice that shifts arsenic in to vacuoles. This mechanism helps to prevent the toxic element from traveling into grains.

U.S. government spends $31 million for diversity in science

Bethesda - A dozen academic research groups have received substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health funding to improve the diversity of the American biomedical community.

Oldest human genome sequenced

A 45,000-year-old bone has been sequenced. This is the oldest human genome yet to have been sequenced. The bone came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

Chikungunya viral infections in France

Montpellier - The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported on four locally acquired cases of the virus in France: four members of the same family in Montpellier.

GrowlTap, a way to keep craft beer fresh

Robert Scott, from Denver, has invented a handy device that turns a glass growler into a mini keg. This allows beer lovers to drink their craft beer at their own pace, which means that the beer does not need to consumed in one sitting.

Lab creates coldest air in the universe

A laboratory has created the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The air was developed in Italy and was verified using instruments designed by Yale University.

Peppers recalled due to Salmonella risk

An agriculture company based in the U.S. is recalling 6, 215 pounds of Fresh Serrano Chile Peppers due to a potential risk of Salmonella infection.

U.K. invests £230 million in disease research

London - The British government is to partner the Medical Research Council to develop new methods orientated towards identifying the causes of diseases such as cancer and dementia.

Team Morris and Prostate Cancer Canada support Men's health

Toronto - Prostate Cancer Canada has entered into a partnership with Canadian men's curling team "Team Morris", led by Skip John Morris. The new partnership will focus on the promotion of health, wellness and fitness for Canadian men.

Plant science aims to help with world hunger

Three leading scientists have said that basic plant science and its application to agriculture, emphasizing can help to deal with global food demands.

Plant grown treatment for pulmonary hypertension

People suffering with pulmonary hypertension have few treatment options. However, a novel therapy, that has been trialled in animals, has the potential to be an effective therapy.
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