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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Travel, Sports, Technology, Food, recipes, Careers & workplace,   see all» Internet, Celebrities, Sexual health, Politics, Food, dining & restaurants, Charity & volunteer work, Education, Environment & green living, Concerts, Health, Video games, Movies, Jobs, Women's health, Entertainment, Science & space, Men's health, General business news & info, Board games, Books, Music, Pharmaceuticals, Government, Drinks, Social media



Burglar killed after getting stuck in a chimney

Huron - A suspected burglar, a little too big in size for his cunning plan, has been killed after getting stuck in a chimney after an unsuspecting family lit a fire in the hearth.

Why loneliness might kill you sooner

Chicago - Being alone can be bad for your health, according to a new study. Here the impact on health is assessed as greater than that of obesity. However, has this really been proven?

Heart beat rate predicts life expectancy

A study suggests how fast a person's heart beats, when resting, can help to predict whether they are going to die early.

Review: Inside a tasting of eclectic whiskies in London Special

Harrow - This week Digital Journal had the opportunity to taste eight very different whiskies, seven from Scotland and one from Ireland at the splendid Victorian manor house, the Grim's Dyke.

Top 10 winter driving tips

It's important to drive safely throughout the year. However, the winter season generally brings the greatest risks. We present the ten most useful tips.

Biometric tattoo is the latest in wearable technology

Austin - Wearable technology continues to advance at a rapid rate. The latest product to be prototyped uses electroconductive tattoo ink to connect sensors pressed against the skin to monitor vital signs.

Catch the dust, real gold as light as air

Zurich - A new type of gold has been created and it is as light as air. The new material takes the form of a foam and it is one thousand times lighter than mined gold, making the material the lightest form of the metal ever produced.

Review: Microbiologists from Europe discuss keeping medicines safe Special

Nottingham - This week the U.K.'s biggest conference dedicated to pharmaceutical microbiology took place in Nottingham. The key themes were risk assessment, coping with aging facilities, and addressing contamination issues.

Wearable kidneys could replace dialysis machines

Los Angeles - Kidney dialysis is a long, drawn-out process, requiring those undergoing the treatment to spend long periods inside specially designed machines. This could be about to change with a new, wearable medical device.

Is it time to ban prescription drug adverts?

New York - A call has been made to prevent prescription-only drugs from being advertised because less expensive generic drugs may be crowded out of the marketplace.

New drugs, mergers and protests, pharma industry round-up

This week a new drug for dealing with opioid overdose has been announced. There’s a buy-out for a dyslipidemia product; plus another larger merger; and also a vaccine price protest. Digital Journal brings another round-up of pharmaceutical sector news.

Watch adorable birds tap-dance while attracting a mate

An enchanting video has been released showing adorable and colourful birds undertake a rhythmical dance, replete with toe-tapping action, in a bid to attract a mate.

Should Robert Califf head up the FDA?

Washington - President Obama’s preferred candidate to head up the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has faced criticisms over his apparent ties with the pharmaceutical industry. Robert Califf recently faced a hearing in the U.S. Senate.

Essential Science: Health effects of antibiotic use

A disturbing, newly issued report suggests just one single course of antibiotics can disrupt the microbial composition in the gut sufficiently to trigger a spate of unintended ill-health effects. Digital Journal gets to the bottom of the issue.

Fighting arthritic pain with the vagus nerve

The majority of nerves run from the body to the brain. The vagus nerve, however, goes in the opposite direction, running from the brain to the body. Scientists think they can exploit this for pain management.

Obese children showing signs of heart disease

The growing problem of childhood obesity has been well documented and several health initiatives are in place. These may need to be advanced following a review of symptoms of heart disease in children.

Dressing senses infection with color change

A dressing has been devised which senses infections by changing color. People who suffer with burns are very vulnerable should the wound become infected; the new bandage is a way to signal medics.

Milky Way once stole a neighboring star cluster

Sometime ago, the Milky Way stole a star cluster from one of its neighbors. This act of interstellar theft has come to light from data gathered from the Hubble Space Telescope.

Bilingual people recover from strokes better

Edinburgh - Bilingual people, according to a new study, are twice as likely to recover from a stroke compared with people who speak just one language.

Vampire bats vomit up blood to share with others

Panama - Stomach turning fact of the week: vampire bats vomit up blood they have recently eaten and share it with their fellow bats.
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