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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Technology, Men's health, Jobs, Sexual health, Music,   see all» General business news & info, Pharmaceuticals, Food, dining & restaurants, Environment & green living, Sports, Drinks, Food, recipes, Video games, Movies, Celebrities, Women's health, Health, Travel, Charity & volunteer work, Social media, Concerts, Board games, Books, Politics, Education, Science & space, Careers & workplace, Entertainment, Government, Internet

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Studying human development via tadpoles

In order to find out the role that thyroid hormones play in development, researchers have turned to studying tadpoles and are charting their transformation into frogs.

Tackling tropical tick disease by stopping cell hopping

Researchers have determined how a sometimes deadly tropical parasite, transmitted by ticks, turns healthy cells into cancer-like invasive cells. It is hoped that the new understanding will pave the way for a treatment.

Review: Dining at the Oxo Tower Brassiere, London Special

London - London has many fine and interesting restaurants. One of the best is the Oxo Tower, located on the south bank. Digital Journal sampled the lunch menu on offer in the brasserie.

Lions suffering from ‘dog disease’

The disease, commonly known to affect dogs, called canine distemper is more widespread among animal species than previously thought. This includes many lions.

Health warning over opioid painkillers and pregnancy

Washington - Opioid medications are commonly used among women of reproductive age. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has warned that taking these medications early in pregnancy can increase the risk for some birth defects.

Women paid far less than men in universities

Why are there so few women in academia? New research suggests that perceptions of a need for brilliance to excel in a field of study contribute to its relatively low numbers of women.

Concerns continue with compounding pharmacies

Washington - Following widespread concerns during 2012 and 2013, a new report suggests there are still gaps in the oversight of U.S. compounding pharmacies.

The clock ticks over new rabies treatment

Treating rabies is a race against the clock. Once someone has been bitten, medical help must be delivered quickly. Researchers are proposing a new treatment that can be delivered a little later.

Should powdered caffeine be banned? Special

Washington - Six U.S. senators are calling on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban the trade of powdered caffeine – caffeine in its pure form. This is due to the associated risks.

Op-Ed: Are liberals healthier than conservatives?

According to some new research, people of a liberal political persuasion tend to live for longer, and healthier, than those more inclined to conservative philosophy.

New funding to fight antibiotic resistance Special

This week the White House stated that it will double the amount of federal funding put aside to combat and preventing antibiotic resistance. The sum stands at greater than $1.2 billion.

Five recommendations for dementia action in Canada Special

A new report released from the University of Saskatchewan-based Rural Dementia Action Research (RaDAR) Team and the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council (HQC) reveals the scope of dementia across the province.

New protein detonates bacteria from within

Tel Aviv - By sequencing the DNA of bacteria resistant to viral toxins, scientists have identified novel proteins capable of stymieing growth in pathogenic, antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Science publications enter into merger mega-deal

London - Major science publisher Macmillan Science and Education, the publisher of Nature and Scientific American, is to join forces with Springer Science+Business Media.

Vernon Mountcastle, pioneering neuroscientist, has died

New York - Vernon Mountcastle, who mapped the functional landscape of the neocortex, has died at the age of 96. His original theory, now commonly accepted, was seen as of immense controversy back in the 1960s.

Amazing feats of the magnetic turtles

Loggerhead sea turtles use the Earth’s magnetic fields to find their way home, according to a new study. This navigational feat is achieved over great distances and across choppy waters.

Diaper compound makes cells appear 'really big'

In order to improve the power of optical microscopy, researchers have managed to enlarge key biological features inside cells.

New understanding with anti-malarial drug resistance

London - Researchers have identified mutations associated with resistance to afrontline antimalarial drug called artemisinin. This is part of the fight back against anti-malarial drug resistance.

Thalidomide vicitims in Canada press further for justice Special

Toronto - Ninety-five of the victims from the Thalidomide scandal are alive and residing in Canada. They continue to push for justice and have spoken with Minister Ambrose. The Canadian government may soon agree to fund full support of the Thalidomide survivors.

Developing gene therapy to lower cancer risks

Gene therapy is the primary method for treating rare, genetic diseases. However, many treatments carry the risk of cancer. A new study has attempted to lower this risk.
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