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Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Celebrities, Social media, Food, dining & restaurants, Food, recipes, Drinks,   see all» Movies, Men's health, Concerts, Jobs, Sports, Science & space, Board games, Books, Travel, Politics, Music, Pharmaceuticals, Environment & green living, Internet, Technology, General business news & info, Sexual health, Entertainment, Charity & volunteer work, Video games, Education, Health, Careers & workplace, Women's health, Government

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Graphene technology used to desalinate water

Manchester - Given that less than 1 percent of the water on the planet is drinkable, a process to remove minerals, like salt, from water could help to alleviate many problems for the global community.

Super-strong ‘uncuttable’ graphene nanofibers developed

Dallas - By manipulating the electromechanical properties of nanofibers, so that they stretch some seven times their natural length, scientists have created a material that is stronger and tougher than Kevlar.

Square snowflakes? Easy with graphene

Manchester - Scientists, investigating the properties of ice, have managed to form a perfect square snowflake with the help of graphene, the carbon-based material.

When is it right to dissect dead bodies?

The number of post-mortem examinations carried out with the consent of relatives has shown a progressive decline across Europe. This trend has triggered sufficient concern to be debated at a special conference.

Fund launched to fight global resistant infections

A new global campaign has been launched called the Fleming Fund, with the aim of harnessing resources to tackle the growing problem of antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria.

Ebola situation in Guinea remains serious

President of Guinea Alpha Conde has declared a 45-day "health emergency". This applies to five regions in the west and south-west of the country, and the reason is Ebola.

Review: First glimpse of the new James Bond movie

London - The trailer for the new James Bond movie, called "Spectre", has been released. in one day the trailer has clocked up almost 800,000 YouTube views.

The gap between medical marijuana and street pot

As more and more states legalize medical marijuana, the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is concerned that the marijuana used in research is becoming further removed from the type common on the streets.

Op-Ed: Costs of doing science climbs in Argentina

Scientists in Argentina are struggling with budgets due to government tariffs which mean that most tools and reagents cost more than double their normal retail value.

FDA decides GM apples and potatoes are safe

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has deemed genetically modified, non-browning apples and bruise-resistant potatoes to be "safe" for consumption.

How to swallow without a tongue?

How do animals without tongues swallow? With one species - mudskippers - scientists have shown that these creatures use mouthfuls of water, like land-based amphibians use their fleshy tongues, to catch and swallow their prey.

The Yeti is probably a Himalayan bear

Beware of the Yeti. Talk of a mysterious creature wandering the regions of the Himalayas is a subject of sightings and it is an entrenched part of local folklore. A science team think they have an explanation.

Man who set out to disprove viral-measles link ordered pay up

Berlin-k - A scientist who offered a €100,000 reward to anyone who could prove that measles is a virus must pay up, according to a ruling from a German court. The issue centers on the measles vaccine debate.

World's most expensive whisky sold at auction

Hong Kong - Recently the world's most expensive whisky was sold at auction. Sotheby’s, in Hong Kong, sold a bottle of The Macallan whisky for HK$4.9 million ($631,850). This set a world record, ratified by the Guinness Book of Records.

Soil microbes influence grape and wine quality

Researchers have studied the microbial composition of a wine grapevine. The examination unearthed the fact that the microbes found in grapes, on leaves and flowers are derived from the microbes found in the plant's roots.

Malaria cells produce odors that attract mosquitoes

Malaria causing parasites produce chemical compounds that give off odors. These odors attract mosquitoes to come and bite an infected animal, thereby ensuring the cycle of infection continues.

Tiny bio-robots used to fight assess humidity

Scientists have developed an electromechanical device (a type of humidity sensor) placed on top of a bacterial spore. This nanobot is a form of robotic germ and it could play role in assessing food storage conditions.

Heat tolerant beans could help alleviate poverty

A loss of crops and protein as a result of social, economic and climatic changes poses a new challenge for world hunger. A research group are addressing this with new plant lines to provide beans.

How green spaces help to cut air pollution Special

Toronto - A new study indicates that green spaces in cities and towns provide health and environmental benefits, especially during hot weather.

Top tips for shingles pain management Special

Shingles is a painful viral infection: more troublesome and itchy than chickenpox. For adults affected with the virus, the condition lasts on-and-off for a long-time. A top dermatologist has spoken with Digital Journal about dealing with the condition.
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