Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
    Log in with Twitter
Articles 6K Images 3K Expertise Events
Block from view
You need to be a registered user to contact other users.

Tim Sandle

Editor-at-Large based in London, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. Joined on Oct 1, 2011
Expertise in Pharmaceuticals, Men's health, Entertainment, Technology, Careers & workplace,   see all» Women's health, Food, dining & restaurants, Board games, Sexual health, Drinks, Internet, Celebrities, Food, recipes, Environment & green living, Concerts, Video games, Health, Charity & volunteer work, Science & space, Politics, Jobs, Books, Social media, Movies, Government, General business news & info, Travel, Education, Sports, Music

Achievements


News

Plastic-eating caterpillar addresses waste problem

Cambridge - A plastic-eating caterpillar could munch polymeric waste and help to address the problems of plastic waste disposal that accumulates in landfills, according to a Cambridge science team.

World's first malaria vaccine tested

The world's first vaccine against the parasitic disease malaria is to be tested in Kenya, Ghana and Malawi. This represents one of the biggest trials of a developmental drug.

Essential Science: Making more efficient biofuels

Are biofuels the answer to the world’s energy needs or do the problems, including diverting food crops for fuel, carry an unnecessary level of social and economic problems? If biofuels are the answer, how can they be made for efficient?

No autism link to prenatal exposure to antidepressants

One concern is that mothers who take antidepressants while pregnant go on to have children who develop autism. A new scientific study disproves this.

Brain gains in elderly mice given human umbilical cord plasma

In what could turn out to be a major science breakthrough, researchers have succeeded in rejuvenating old mice’s brains and improve their memories by injecting them with plasma taken from human umbilical cords.

Hospitals in the U.K. to limit sales of sugary drinks

London - The major retailers who operate stores in Britain's biggest hospitals have agreed to 'scale back' (but not to stop completely) the sale of sugary drinks.

Altering amino acids incapacitates cancer

Amino acids are necessary for life. When these molecules go wrong they can trigger the formation of cancerous cells. New research suggests targeting two amino acids can stop cancerous cell growth.

Assessing the ‘health’ of rivers using DNA analysis

How healthy is a river? One answer is to assess the biodiversity of the waterway. This involves assessing the biodiversity. Current methods involve multiple testing, assessing microscopic marine life. A new method has been proposed based on DNA.

Bad mix of gut microbes triggers age-associated inflammation

Inflammation increases with age and this leads to ill-health problems. One of the triggers appears to be the balance of microorganisms in the gut. This is based on studies using mice and the findings may well apply to people.

Op-Ed: Climate change leads the London 'March for Science' agenda Special

London - Hundreds of thousands of scientists have taken to the streets to 'march for science' to combat fake news and the counterfactual political culture espoused by Donald Trump and other leading politicians. Digital Journal was at the London event.

Ready for a long, hot summer? Self-cooling clothing could help

University of California San Diego scientists have developed a low-cost plastic material which can act as the base material for clothing that cools down the wearer.

Worrying spread of parasitic worm in Hawaii

A parasitic roundworm that causes rat lungworm disease appears to be spreading on the Hawaiian island of Maui. During the past three months six people have become infected.

Want to live longer? Then cycle to work

Glasgow - Want to live longer? Reduce your risk of cancer? Lowe the chance of heart disease? The answer is to cycle to work, according to a new health study.

Artificial sweeteners linked to stroke and dementia risk

A new warning has been made about artificial sweeteners. A study suggests drinking a can of diet soft drink a day is linked with a three times higher risk of stroke and dementia.

Britain's first coal free day since the Victorian era

London - The U.K. experienced its first day of power generation during which time no coal was used. This is the first day that coal played no part since the early days of the Industrial Revolution.

World Health Organization seeks to end hepatitis

Geneva - The World Health Organization has called upon the nations of the world to come together and to work towards the global eliminate of hepatitis.

Salamanders in Europe set to be wiped out by fungus

Scientists have called for urgent action to be taken to protect wild salamanders in Europe from a deadly fungal infection.

Computer pioneer Harry Huskey has died

Harry Huskey, who helped build many of the first ever computers and who worked alongside Alan Turing, has died aged 101.

Italy declares man's brain tumor linked to his mobile phone use

The Italian court, in Ivrea, has ruled that a man's brain tumor is linked to his mobile phone use. This is based on extensive smartphone use. The connection is, however, questioned by experts.

Has a treatment for Alzheimer’s been developed?

Leicester - British scientists think they are on a path to developing a drug that can stop all neurodegenerative brain diseases, including dementia. The drug stops brain cells from dying.
  1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 323 Next»