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microbiome News

Gut microbes change after spinal cord injury

Further research about the body’s dynamic microbiome has been published, this time in relation to alterations following a spinal cord injury. The findings are important for patient recovery.

New evidence for the role of bacteria in incontinence

The feeling of suddenly having to urinate is an unpleasant one and repeated occurrences can affect many people. The underlying causes are varied, although one factor may be microbial in origin.

Antimicrobial resistance occurs naturally in soil bacteria

Bacteria, isolated from soil and with no known contact with human society, have been shown to exhibit antimicrobial properties. The organisms were isolated from in prairie soils.

Study of human health requires artificial gut

To study the effects of the microbiome on human health and disease, microbiologists have developed an artificial human gut. The bio-structure will allow experiments to run.

Essential Science: New types of microbial life in the oceans

The seas and oceans of the world make up the majority of the surface and less is known about life in the oceans compared with the surface of the moon. New research has revealed the mysteries of oceanic microbial life.

Can modifying the microbiome reduce autism?

Scientists have found that the absence of a single species of bacteria contributes to autism-like social behaviors. Moreover, adding this bacterium back normal social activity is restored.

Studying the guts of babies predicts asthma

Microbiologists are now certain that characterizing the gut microorganisms of new born babies informs about the likelihood of babies going on to develop diseases such as asthma later in life.

Predicting lung disease in infants through new test

Research into the human microbiome is revealing key information related to health and well being. A new tranche of this research has found variations to the microbial community in the lungs of infants offer clues about susceptibility to lung diseases.

Essential Science: Taking on metabolic disorders with starch

A new study indicates that supplementing the diet of people with metabolic syndrome with resistant starch helps improve the condition. This happens by altering gut bacteria.

Cities have individual microbial signatures

Each city in the world has character, based on the buildings, the people, and its culture, and so on. How about the microorganisms in the air, on surfaces and in the water? New research suggests cities can be profiled at the biological level.

Essential Science: Why the microbiome of seminal fluid is important

New research discusses the microbiome of seminal fluid. Although focused on animals, the research could lead to a new area of medicine where the microorganisms in seminal fluid could be used to assess male health.

Antibiotic soap can alter a baby’s gut bacteria

Antibiotic soaps containing the active ingredient triclocarban, which can be purchased in stores, could, during pregnancy and breast-feeding, alter a baby’s composition of intestinal bacteria . This could have health implications.

Inside the connection between bacterial toxins and obesity

Scientists have made a connection between bacteria that reside in the human gut (specifically toxic by-products) and obesity. The research adds to the body of work about the microbiome.

Do our bodies really have more microbes than human cells?

Pick up a text book on microbiology or human physiology. Chances are you’ll stumble across a reference to the number of microorganisms in the human body exceeding the number of cells ten-fold. But is this correct?

Exercising early changes gut microbes for the better

A new study has found how exercising while younger alters the types of gut microbes so that the composition is different than a person who takes up exercise later in life. These changes to the gut microbiome are beneficial.

Treating heart disease through the gut

Scientists have shown that focusing on microorganisms within the human gut could be the answer to prevent a type of heart disease associated with diet.

Men and women deposit different types of bacteria

The types of bacteria found in the home vary according to whether more men or women live in the house, as well as whether household pets are present.

Essential Science: Health effects of antibiotic use

A disturbing, newly issued report suggests just one single course of antibiotics can disrupt the microbial composition in the gut sufficiently to trigger a spate of unintended ill-health effects. Digital Journal gets to the bottom of the issue.

Processed foods alter gut bacteria, trigger inflammatory disease Special

Bethesda - The composition of bacteria in the human gut shapes whether a person is more prone towards obesity. In turn, this gut composition can be affected by diet with processed foods presenting some modern day challenges.

Gut bacteria could prevent type 1 diabetes

Through an investigation of the immune response, researchers have discovered that certain bacteria can protect against the development of type 1 diabetes.

Why scientists are trying to reboot the gut Special

Boston - We’ve coexisted with bacteria for years because evolution has ensured we can’t do without them. Bacteria form large colonies or ecological communities — known as the microbiome or microbiota.

Eyes differ, risk to contact lens wearers revealed

New York - Researchers, through analysing thousands of eye specimens, have concluded that the risk of infection to contact lens wearers depends on the individual and that the risk can change over time. This is due to the microbes in the eye.

Evidence in support of a probiotic for gut health

Eating a probiotic encourages the activity of beneficial gut microbes, leading to improved gut health. This is according to a new study using a special live yogurt.

Immune cells help beneficial bacteria triumph over bad

The immune system helps to shape the balance of good or bad bacteria in the human gut. Researchers have found a protein on white blood cells affects the balance of the microorganisms in the gut.

Preventing antibiotics from killing beneficial bacteria

The microorganisms in the human gut can help the body to maintain a state of health. One problem with antibiotics, when used to fight pathogens, is that they can indiscriminately kill off beneficial bacteria. A new compound can help address this concern.

Are our gut bacteria swapped when we snuggle up?

Paris - The microorganisms that reside in the guts influence a number of health outcomes. There are variations between people. One source of the variation might be the extent of “personal relationships”, according to a new study.

Find out how breastfeeding boosts the immune system

Scientists have demonstrated that breastfeeding, along with other factors, beneficially influences a baby's immune system development. It also reduces susceptibility to allergies and asthma.

Gut microbes linked to Type I diabetes

In a major study scientists have confirmed a connection between changes in gut microbes and the onset of type 1 diabetes. The research tracked infants over a long period of time, in order to demonstrate the relationship.

Gut bacteria influence Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

New research suggests that a person’s specific genes influence whether intestinal bacteria will trigger inflammatory bowel diseases. Understanding such causes is provides knowledge to help with prevention and treatment.

Parkinson’s disease linked to gut bacteria

A new strand of research shows that people suffering from Parkinson’s disease have a different composition of bacteria in their intestines compared with normal adults. A research group think that there is a causative connection.
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microbiome Image

Diagram showing the diversity of the human microbiome
Diagram showing the diversity of the human microbiome
Human Microbiome Project
Professor Andrew Gewirtz displays some of his work to the PDA microbiology conference  October 2015.
Professor Andrew Gewirtz displays some of his work to the PDA microbiology conference, October 2015.
Professor Andrew Gewirtz addresses the PDA 10th Annual Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiol...
Professor Andrew Gewirtz addresses the PDA 10th Annual Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiology, October 2015.

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