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microbiome News

Essential Science: Health effects of antibiotic use

A disturbing, newly issued report suggests just one single course of antibiotics can disrupt the microbial composition in the gut sufficiently to trigger a spate of unintended ill-health effects. Digital Journal gets to the bottom of the issue.

Processed foods alter gut bacteria, trigger inflammatory disease Special

Bethesda - The composition of bacteria in the human gut shapes whether a person is more prone towards obesity. In turn, this gut composition can be affected by diet with processed foods presenting some modern day challenges.

Gut bacteria could prevent type 1 diabetes

Through an investigation of the immune response, researchers have discovered that certain bacteria can protect against the development of type 1 diabetes.

Why scientists are trying to reboot the gut Special

Boston - We’ve coexisted with bacteria for years because evolution has ensured we can’t do without them. Bacteria form large colonies or ecological communities — known as the microbiome or microbiota.

Eyes differ, risk to contact lens wearers revealed

New York - Researchers, through analysing thousands of eye specimens, have concluded that the risk of infection to contact lens wearers depends on the individual and that the risk can change over time. This is due to the microbes in the eye.

Evidence in support of a probiotic for gut health

Eating a probiotic encourages the activity of beneficial gut microbes, leading to improved gut health. This is according to a new study using a special live yogurt.

Immune cells help beneficial bacteria triumph over bad

The immune system helps to shape the balance of good or bad bacteria in the human gut. Researchers have found a protein on white blood cells affects the balance of the microorganisms in the gut.

Preventing antibiotics from killing beneficial bacteria

The microorganisms in the human gut can help the body to maintain a state of health. One problem with antibiotics, when used to fight pathogens, is that they can indiscriminately kill off beneficial bacteria. A new compound can help address this concern.

Are our gut bacteria swapped when we snuggle up?

Paris - The microorganisms that reside in the guts influence a number of health outcomes. There are variations between people. One source of the variation might be the extent of “personal relationships”, according to a new study.

Find out how breastfeeding boosts the immune system

Scientists have demonstrated that breastfeeding, along with other factors, beneficially influences a baby's immune system development. It also reduces susceptibility to allergies and asthma.

Gut microbes linked to Type I diabetes

In a major study scientists have confirmed a connection between changes in gut microbes and the onset of type 1 diabetes. The research tracked infants over a long period of time, in order to demonstrate the relationship.

Gut bacteria influence Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

New research suggests that a person’s specific genes influence whether intestinal bacteria will trigger inflammatory bowel diseases. Understanding such causes is provides knowledge to help with prevention and treatment.

Parkinson’s disease linked to gut bacteria

A new strand of research shows that people suffering from Parkinson’s disease have a different composition of bacteria in their intestines compared with normal adults. A research group think that there is a causative connection.

Study: A 10-second kiss could transfer 80 million bacteria

Amsterdam - According to a new study, kissing for only 10 seconds could transfer up to 80 million bacteria. However gross that might sound, scientists believe that sharing bacteria through kissing helps us stay healthy by boosting the immune system.

Great apes have larger bacterial diversity than humans

Austin - According to a new study, chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas harbor more microbial diversity in their guts than humans do.

Gut bacteria, health and genetics are interlinked

Analyzing data from a large twin study, researchers have homed in on how host genetics can shape the composition of the microbes in the gut. The types of microbes in the body is connected with human health.

Glucose intolerance linked to gut bacteria

London - Synchronous co-ordination between our bacteria and biological clocks is necessary for preventing obesity and glucose intolerance, according to a new study. This is a further example of the important role gut bacteria play in human health.

Frozen feces helps to treat gut infections

Boston - In a new medical study, several patients with recurring bacterial infections caused by Clostridium difficile found relief from diarrhea by ingesting frozen fecal matter from healthy volunteers.

Gut microbes affect flu vaccine effectiveness

Atlanta - Researchers have discovered that the composition of the microorganisms in the gut affect effectivity of the seasonal flu vaccine. This potentially means that your gut bacteria affect how effective the vaccine will be within your own body.

Irish rugby players have exceptional guts

Various reports have indicated that exercise and diet impact gut microbial diversity. A new study of Irish rugby players shows that the gut bacteria of athletes are more diverse than other people, and that athletes have a healthier metabolism.

Microorganisms in the penis revealed

Circumcision and sexual activity are two key factors that can influence the bacterial communities that inhabit male genitalia.

Dollar bills carry over 3,000 bacteria

New York - By swabbing dollar bills circulating in New York City, scientists have found more than 3,000 different types of bacteria on the currency.

Preterm babies and risks from gut bacteria

Babies born prematurely often withstand complications of early birth only to suffer late-onset sepsis at 72 hours of age. Researchers have discovered that preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis.

Illustrating the human body with 'Microcartography'

Artist Sonja Bäumel has explored the human skin microbiome in her project 'Cartography of the Human Body'. To illustrate the diversity of the bacteria and fungi on the skin, she cultured isolates from her own body to create an innovative art project.

Immune system and skin microbiome

A person’s immune system appears to influence the types of microorganisms found on their skin. This, in turn, can affect whether the skin remains healthy or not.

Can gut bacteria help a person to slim?

Gut bacteria from thin people were transferred to the intestines of mice carrying microbes from obese people. The new bacteria kept mice from getting tubby.

Caesarean linked to increased child allergies

Children born via Caesarean section are more often affected by allergies than those born in the natural way, according to a new study, due to children having a lower diversity of gut bacteria.

Is autism linked to gut bacteria?

Phoenix - New research suggests that the bacteria that reside in the human gut influence children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is related to stomach conditions in children who go onto show signs of autism.

Homes with dogs have more varied types of bacteria

A new "citizen science" study has shown that households with dogs are home to more types of bacteria - including bacteria that are rarely found in households that do not have dogs.

Good intestinal bacteria can prevent diabetes

The type of bacteria found within the intestines appears to affect the risk of someone developing diabetes, once other lifestyle factors have been taken into account.
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microbiome Image

Professor Andrew Gewirtz addresses the PDA 10th Annual Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiol...
Professor Andrew Gewirtz addresses the PDA 10th Annual Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiology, October 2015.
Diagram showing the diversity of the human microbiome
Diagram showing the diversity of the human microbiome
Human Microbiome Project
Professor Andrew Gewirtz displays some of his work to the PDA microbiology conference  October 2015.
Professor Andrew Gewirtz displays some of his work to the PDA microbiology conference, October 2015.