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Sustainability News

Changes in intensity and number of storms to hit fishing industry

Climate-driven changes in the intensity and frequency of storms around the world could end up having "catastrophic consequences" on the safety and livelihood of fisherman and the sustainability of fishing industries, according to new research.

Over 40 companies pledge to cut UK plastic pollution

More than 40 companies, including Britain’s biggest supermarkets, Coca-Cola, Nestle and Procter & Gamble, have bowed to growing pressure to tackle pollution by committing to cut plastic use over the next seven years.

A discussion on transitioning to a green economy — Part 1

Concerned that workers will be left out of jobs as countries transition to a green economy, the International Trade Union Confederation is advocating for a clear and fair transition plan for employees when it comes to this kind of industry-wide changes.

Canada's Supercluster plan includes plant-based protein farmers

Prairie farmers in Canada who grow rather than raise protein sources are poised to break into the mainstream with new research and investment opportunities - made available through the government's Supercluster Initiative.

New study shows vast scope of our exploitation of the ocean

Monitoring the global fishing industry has been difficult, and this means visualizing its global footprint has been almost impossible. Much of the fishing is unobserved, taking place far from land, with boats leaving little trace of their activity.

Over two dozen small refineries making biofuel waiver requests

Over two dozen small U.S. refineries are seeking waivers from the nation’s biofuels law, an unusually high number that reflects growing oil industry resistance to the program, according to sources familiar with the matter.

'Green' Bitcoin alternative Chia cuts electricity use

The inventor of the BitTorrent torrent network has announced a new cryptocurrency that's a more eco-friendly alternative to Bitcoin. Mining cryptocurrencies requires massive amounts of electricity. Chia uses a different approach that's less demanding.

Africa's agriculture needs a big dose of digital transformation

Scientists are now calling for a technological transformation in how Africans undertake agricultural production. With almost three quarters of the workforce on the continent focussed on agriculture, such a change could lead to rapid innovation.

BP in talks with electric car makers on service station chargers

The U.K.'s multinational oil and gas company BP is in talks with electric vehicle makers to offer recharging docks at its global network of fuel service stations, BP CEO Bob Dudley announced on Tuesday.

JP Morgan Chase goes all in on renewable energy investments

Those who control the money always seem to have a disproportionate amount of both social and political power, so JP Morgan Chase's announcement that they have committed to 100 percent renewables by 2020 is the biggest news yet for the energy sector.

Study finds Earth's 'pristine' groundwater at risk of pollution

Vienna - Contamination brought about by human activity is creating a looming threat to the planet's groundwater resources, warns researchers in a new study published on Tuesday.

The world may be facing a shortage of 'technology minerals'

Led by the University of Delaware's Saleem Ali, an international team of researchers is warning that greater global political and scientific cooperation will be required to secure resources needed in the future.

Clean energy momentum in U.S continues as wind power soars

Clean energy's momentum continues into 2017 and beyond, and there is no stopping it, President Obama asserted in a thesis published in the journal Science on Monday.

What happened to Dunkin' Donuts' vow to get rid of Styrofoam cups?

In 2010, Dunkin' Donuts said it was looking for a replacement for its iconic Styrofoam coffee cups because they were environmentally unfriendly. After six years, the company is still using them. What gives?

Spread of urban centers over 6,000 years mapped by researchers

An interesting new study has mapped the growth of cities and urban centers worldwide, from 3700 BC, and the cradle of civilization in Mesopotamia, to 2000 AD. The results of the study may tell us something useful about shifts in urbanization today.

'Front yard vegetable garden' war is on in Missouri

Here's an interesting question to start out the week: Should families be allowed to plant a vegetable garden in their front yards? The city of Sugar Creek, Missouri says no way.

Water table dropping all over globe — 4 billion people at risk

Water is a precious resource the world cannot do without, yet water scarcity is growing faster than previously thought. A new study shows that today, over four billion people are at risk from water shortages.

Cities in Australia move towards sustainable street lighting

A number of Australian councils are forging ahead with smart street light projects aiming to shift towards enhanced sustainability and a set of new energy efficiency goals.

Ecoville.to: Growing the green community of tomorrow Special

Toronto - I had the opportunity recently to sit down with Ayden Byle, the founder of Ecoville.to, a Canadian start-up that is looking to deliver to environmentally-aware homebuyers an affordably sleek sustainable dwelling in an eco-village setting.

Op-Ed: Eclectic Chic—reduce, reuse, and recycle Special

Millerton - The trendy table of today is set with a mismatched collection of silver from various aunts, fine china discovered at antiques shops, and old jelly jars. Millennials have learned to cherish fine, unique things and reject their parents’ disposable culture

Living off the grid on Lasqueti Island, B.C.

Lasqueti - We live in a world governed by our needs. if we want something bad enough, we run to the market, or to the refrigerator. Our lives are centered around public utilities and convenience, and God forbid if anything fails. We are literally left in the dark.

Op-Ed: WWF report — To live like Americans would take 3.9 planets

Humans are consuming more resources than the planet can provide, a trend that has steadily worsened over the past 50 years. A report issued last week ranks nations by their “ecological footprint,” showing just how far out of balance things have become

Wastewater turned into tap water thanks to man-made wetlands

Technology keeps healthy water continuously flowing between Dallas and Houston in Texas with the help of nature and human ingenuity.

Op-Ed: Is the World Economic Forum working for regional economies?

The World Economic Forum's annual conference in Davos concluded this weekend during a turbulent period in emerging markets and yielding questions on the impact the WEF is making globally.

Ted's Montana Grill restaurant chain rapidly expanding Special

The first Ted's Montana Grill was opened in Columbus, Ohio in January 2002 by Ted Turner and restaurateur George McKerrow, Jr. Since that time, the chain has expanded to 44 restaurants in 16 states with bison as the centerpiece of the menu.

Op-Ed: A Carbon Bubble — Black gold as black death for energy companies

A report from Carbon Tracker Initiative warns that fossil fuel reserves held on balance sheets of major energy companies are asset bubble. Carbon Tracker argues such assets are grossly over-valued as governments worldwide move to control carbon emissions.

National Sustainable Design Expo gets set to kick off in D.C. Special

Washington - The annual National Sustainable Design Expo is scheduled to take place this week. Yesterday, work could be observed in downtown Washington to prepare for the 2-day event.

Medellin — 2013's Innovative City of the Year

Medellin, Colombia: Voted 2013's Innovative City of the Year for its implementation of sustainable innovation and a unique budgeting system.

In rural India, youths steer a crusade against food insecurity Special

Hyderabad - Braving dry climate, poverty, poor access to market and calls of Maoist rebels to join them, hundreds of youths from marginalized communities in rural India are turning into food growers, transforming dry, barren land into green, productive fields

China: Grow now, clean up later

The South Africa-based Standard Bank announced that the future BRICS development bank will focus on financing infrastructure development projects, despite China claiming that it would shift its budget to energy efficiency and sustainable development.
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U.S. Department of Energy
Raju s farm on a river island: no chemical pesticide is used in the farm. Instead  oil lamps are use...
Raju's farm on a river island: no chemical pesticide is used in the farm. Instead, oil lamps are used to trap plant-eating pests. Also, used are drip irrigation, organic manure and an extra dose of youthful energy.
The view from the 25th floor of the German consulate in Toronto  Ontario. Bloor St. and Yonge St. No...
The view from the 25th floor of the German consulate in Toronto, Ontario. Bloor St. and Yonge St. November 21, 2011.
The crowd at the German consulate to hear author Chris Turner speak on the German Leap. November 21 ...
The crowd at the German consulate to hear author Chris Turner speak on the German Leap. November 21, 2011.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sustainability
Melbourne street lighting
Melbourne street lighting
Ready, set go by Jes
Equipment used in Stock Assessment
Equipment used in Stock Assessment
DFO/Pacific Biological Station
Ramesh preparing compost manure in his farm. The weeds of the farm are collected and used as raw mat...
Ramesh preparing compost manure in his farm. The weeds of the farm are collected and used as raw materials, along with stalks of beans and other vegetables, peels, dry leaves and cow dung, to make the manure.
Author Chris Turner speaking at the German consulate in Toronto. November 21  2011.
Author Chris Turner speaking at the German consulate in Toronto. November 21, 2011.
The simple  yet effective way the WaterSeer works.
The simple, yet effective way the WaterSeer works.
WaterSeer
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WaterSeer
A view of Iguazu Falls  on the border between Brazil and Argentina
A view of Iguazu Falls, on the border between Brazil and Argentina
UN Photo/Mark Garten
Mallesh tending to a cluster beans plant.  In a tiny farm of two and half acres  the young farmer is...
Mallesh tending to a cluster beans plant. In a tiny farm of two and half acres, the young farmer is growing a whopping twenty two crops.
WaterSeer can create water-sustainability for people worldwide.
WaterSeer can create water-sustainability for people worldwide.
WaterSeer
In what was a dry  barren piece of land until a year ago  Ramesh is now growing a total of twenty tw...
In what was a dry, barren piece of land until a year ago, Ramesh is now growing a total of twenty two crops, organically

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