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Study News

Procrastinate at work? It’s bad for your health

Procrastination is a nasty habit that can keep you from filing on deadline, preparing well for a meeting. Waiting until the last minute to accomplish your task can also lead to unnecessary stress.

Scientific study reveals which diet programs work and don't work

A scientific study has revealed that most commercial diet programs can't provide one scrap of evidence that they work. After extensive analysis, the researchers have concluded that only two diet programs can be considered to be really effective.

Early issues with Apple Pay are putting off users, says study

A study has revealed that early issues with Apple Pay are causing many earlier patriots to neglect regular use of the service. 47% of users have experienced issues in stores advertised as Apple Pay friendly.

New major study finds magnets can control heat and sound

Researchers at the Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with magnetic fields, proving that both heat and sound have magnetic properties.

DNA study: Why the Welsh might be the first true Brits

The English aren't English and the real Britons are the Welsh, says a fascinating new study into the DNA of different ethnic groups in Britain.

Study suggests nose is better than eyes at identifying suspects

The standard method of identifying criminals via the eyewitness lineup may be about to change because a recent study suggests the human nose may be more effective at identifying bad guys than the human eye.

Research shows how climate change is impacting food safety

While there is controversy over the magnitude of its effects, climate change is having an indisputable impact on our food production, supply chain, food safety and the prevalence of foodborne diseases.

Op-Ed: Technology makes education more accessible than ever

The advent of the digital era has revolutionized education and learning for millions of children worldwide, enabling greater collaboration between teachers and pupils and bringing education to places where it was never available via virtual classrooms.

India's tiger census success story may be inaccurate, study says

New Delhi - The accuracy of India's recent tiger census that suggested tiger numbers have increased is now being called into question by a new study. The Indian government had celebrated the rise in tiger numbers from 1706 in 2011 to 2,226 in 2014.

Coffee could lower risk of endometrial cancer

New research has found a link between regularly drinking coffee and a 20% decreased risk of endometrial cancer which currently affects around 1 in 37 US women in their lifetime, adding to the potential health benefits of consuming the popular beverage.

Study finds ties between food security and diabetes

A new study has found that people without a secure source of food and medication are more likely to have less control over their diabetes when compared to people who don’t have concerns over this issue.

Polar bear collars, tranquilizers don't do lasting harm: Study

Polar bears don't suffer any long-term harm when they are shot with tranquilizer darts, briefly handled, and fitted with radio collars, even if the bear is captured up to 10 times, according to a new study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Study: BP spill left Rhode Island-sized oil ring on sea floor

When the devastating environmental disaster of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in 2010, nearly 200 million barrels of oil went missing, and scientists long wondered where the oil went. Now, part of that question has been answered.

Study: Shape of person's face indication of aggression, dominance

Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that the shape of a person's face can determine how domineering and aggressive they are.

Two new studies address the physical effects of shift work

Sleep disorders are fairly common in the U.S. Millions of people, regardless of age, gender, or lifestyle, suffer from disorders such as sleep apnea, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy, and various circadian rhythm disorders.

Study hints dogs might get jealous

A nine-month study published in the science journal, PLOS ONE, hinted in July there is a chance dogs might get jealous. Experts still aren't certain whether the exhibited behavior is actually jealousy, however.

Study: 'Good girls' and 'bad boys' have a dating advantage

According to new findings, men are more responsive to women who are attentive and seem caring on dates. Some common sense conclusions are now being backed up by science.

Siberian team finds evidence that most dinosaurs had feathers

According to a paper published by Russian researchers, our understanding of dinosaur tissues is wrong. Feathers may have possibly been a part of many body structures during that era.

Study: A man's face can dictate his negotiating possiblities

Recent publications from major names in business education have explained how your facial size has an impact on your business negotiations. Men with wide faces have advantages early on but can run into difficulty over compromises.

McAfee study says Superman related searches could be risky

McAfee, one of the leading providers of Internet security solutions, has warned that you could become a victim of Internet criminals who steal personal data and passwords of those searching for information related to their favorite superheroes.

Parasite found in litterboxes may aid cancer treatment

Lebanon - Toxoplasma gondii is the name of a parasite which lives in the fecal matter of cats. The body's response to the organism may be useful for defeating cancer.

Research suggests that antioxidants may protect cancer

Cold Spring Harbor - Doctors David Tuveson and Navdeep S. Chandel have published a study in the New England Journal of Medicine asserting that antioxidants may do more harm than good when treating cancer sufferers.

Doctors create early and effective form of Dengue vaccine

A new vaccine for Dengue Fever has been shown to both reduce the number of cases and reduce severe side effects for those who do get it. This may be the first step towards eliminating the ailment entirely.

Three drifting black holes foster new research for scientists

Three black holes have been observed to be drifting towards each other. Discussion is happening throughout the scientific community as we wait to see what happens when they have fully spiraled into one another.

Study: Older Americans spend more on vacations

Americans tend to spend more on travel and vacation as they get older, according to a newly released study by Capital One Labs.

Study: 'Gaydar' works and conservatives detect gays sooner

Toronto - 'Gaydar' has long been dismissed as a mild joke on certain hunches people have. New research suggests that there is some method by which we can detect that someone is gay. One scientist also claims conservatives are more skilled at this as well.

Study: Morning people are less ethical at night

A new study tells us that you might not want to hire someone just because they are a morning person. The research claims that these people are more likely to be unethical at night.

Study: Teen smokers favor flavored 'cigarillos'

Advertising smoking products for kids has long been banned in North America. Despite that a new study found that teens greatly prefer flavored smoking brands to unflavored ones.

Yale scientists may have accidentally cured baldness

Scientists were looking for a cure for arthritis. They may have found a cure for baldness due to massive hair growth caused by one drug they tested.

Antidepressant study sparks debate on multinational drug culture

The information about suicide risks placed on antidepressants may have caused some doctors to prescribe them less. Researchers with the British Medical Journal and at Harvard Medical School say that this could have led to increased suicides.
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Map showing study areas used by Dr. Michael Hendryx. Over 1184 individuals were involved in the rese...
Map showing study areas used by Dr. Michael Hendryx. Over 1184 individuals were involved in the research.
Michael Hendrix
Spectrogram of pink noise (left) and white noise (right)  shown with linear frequency axis (vertical...
Spectrogram of pink noise (left) and white noise (right), shown with linear frequency axis (vertical)
Wikimedia commons
The River Benue looking south east from Jimeta/Yola  Nigeria.
The River Benue looking south east from Jimeta/Yola, Nigeria.
Amjaca
This graphic was created based on word frequency to call attention to global climate change.
This graphic was created based on word frequency to call attention to global climate change.
Woodley Wonderworks
Researchers discovered that the flow of heat through a semiconductor can be influenced by magnetism
Researchers discovered that the flow of heat through a semiconductor can be influenced by magnetism
Ohio State University
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
The Hispaniolan Hutia is now being followed using GPS and radio telemetry to study its distribution ...
The Hispaniolan Hutia is now being followed using GPS and radio telemetry to study its distribution and home range.
Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund
Gram stain of the bacteria Bordetella pertussis.
Gram stain of the bacteria Bordetella pertussis.
CDC
99 Days of Freedom emotional case study.
99 Days of Freedom emotional case study.
Just B.V. Creative Communications Agency
Charlton Heston and Ronald Reagan at a meeting in the White House. Both of them would later be diagn...
Charlton Heston and Ronald Reagan at a meeting in the White House. Both of them would later be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Photo taken: June 15, 1981
White House Photo Office
Methane burns as it escapes through a hole in the ice in a lagoon above the East Siberian Arctic She...
Methane burns as it escapes through a hole in the ice in a lagoon above the East Siberian Arctic Shelf.
Photo courtesy of Natalia Shakhova
A northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon)  which was captured in 2009 from an island in western Lake ...
A northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon), which was captured in 2009 from an island in western Lake Erie, Ohio. The snake has crusty and thickened scales over raised blisters, a sign of snake fungal disease.
D. E. Green/USGS National Wildlife Health Center
Salvador Dalí (1904–1989)  Study for “The Image Disappears ” 1938. Pencil on paper © Salvad...
Salvador Dalí (1904–1989), Study for “The Image Disappears,” 1938. Pencil on paper © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2012 Photo © 2012 Museum Associates/ LACMA, by Michael Tropea, Private Collection.
Museum Associates/ LACMA, by Michael Tropea
This eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) has opaque eyes and hard  crusty scales on its ...
This eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) has opaque eyes and hard, crusty scales on its snout, telltale signs of snake fungal disease.
D. E. Green/USGS National Wildlife Health Center
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
Untitled
Bowman et.al.
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for ...
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for decades.
Wikimedia commons
Genetic origins of Paleo-Eskimos and Neo-Eskimos.
Genetic origins of Paleo-Eskimos and Neo-Eskimos.
E. Willerslev
Untitled
Wikimedia Commons