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Study News

Study: 'Good girls' and 'bad boys' have a dating advantage

According to new findings, men are more responsive to women who are attentive and seem caring on dates. Some common sense conclusions are now being backed up by science.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Siberian team finds evidence that most dinosaurs had feathers

According to a paper published by Russian researchers, our understanding of dinosaur tissues is wrong. Feathers may have possibly been a part of many body structures during that era.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Study: A man's face can dictate his negotiating possiblities

Recent publications from major names in business education have explained how your facial size has an impact on your business negotiations. Men with wide faces have advantages early on but can run into difficulty over compromises.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

McAfee study says Superman related searches could be risky

McAfee, one of the leading providers of Internet security solutions, has warned that you could become a victim of Internet criminals who steal personal data and passwords of those searching for information related to their favorite superheroes.
In the Media by Sonia D'Costa - 1 comment

Parasite found in litterboxes may aid cancer treatment

Lebanon - Toxoplasma gondii is the name of a parasite which lives in the fecal matter of cats. The body's response to the organism may be useful for defeating cancer.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel - 1 comment

Research suggests that antioxidants may protect cancer

Cold Spring Harbor - Doctors David Tuveson and Navdeep S. Chandel have published a study in the New England Journal of Medicine asserting that antioxidants may do more harm than good when treating cancer sufferers.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel - 1 comment

Doctors create early and effective form of Dengue vaccine

A new vaccine for Dengue Fever has been shown to both reduce the number of cases and reduce severe side effects for those who do get it. This may be the first step towards eliminating the ailment entirely.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Three drifting black holes foster new research for scientists

Three black holes have been observed to be drifting towards each other. Discussion is happening throughout the scientific community as we wait to see what happens when they have fully spiraled into one another.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel - 2 comments

Study: Older Americans spend more on vacations

Americans tend to spend more on travel and vacation as they get older, according to a newly released study by Capital One Labs.
In the Media by Elizabeth Brown

Study: 'Gaydar' works and conservatives detect gays sooner

Toronto - 'Gaydar' has long been dismissed as a mild joke on certain hunches people have. New research suggests that there is some method by which we can detect that someone is gay. One scientist also claims conservatives are more skilled at this as well.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Study: Morning people are less ethical at night

A new study tells us that you might not want to hire someone just because they are a morning person. The research claims that these people are more likely to be unethical at night.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel - 6 comments

Study: Teen smokers favor flavored 'cigarillos'

Advertising smoking products for kids has long been banned in North America. Despite that a new study found that teens greatly prefer flavored smoking brands to unflavored ones.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel - 1 comment

Yale scientists may have accidentally cured baldness

Scientists were looking for a cure for arthritis. They may have found a cure for baldness due to massive hair growth caused by one drug they tested.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel - 4 comments

Antidepressant study sparks debate on multinational drug culture

The information about suicide risks placed on antidepressants may have caused some doctors to prescribe them less. Researchers with the British Medical Journal and at Harvard Medical School say that this could have led to increased suicides.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Study: The Manitoban treasure trove

Winnipeg - Around $117 billion in carbon offsets is no small amount of money for just about anyone. The forest regions of Manitoba may just be worth that to those who can acquire the rights.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Study: Fasting reactivates damaged immune systems

Fasting can protect the immune system and repair it according to findings from various researchers. The reasons why are somewhat surprising.
In the Media by Walter McDaniel

Study: U.S. journalists more negative about their work

A new study on journalism in the United States has shown journalists in the country are more dissatisfied with their work.
In the Media by Alex Veeneman - 2 comments

Reading narrative stories improves brain connectivity

Atlanta - A new study shows that reading fiction novels or short stories improves neural connections in the brain and the effects last several days after reading.
In the Media by Sean Fraser - 7 comments

Study analyzes cyberslacker behavior

Calgary - A new research paper that examines personality traits among cyberslackers, especially those who work at home, has just been released.
In the Media by Gene Kosowan - 1 comment

New study finds prescription drugs and multivitamins a bad mix

A new study that was released Tuesday reported that one in three American adults take prescription drugs and multivitamins at the same time. Many people likely take multivitamins, though they cannot be substituted in place of prescription drugs.
In the Media by Syra Sharif - 2 comments

Canada: Edmonton worst city for women

Ottawa - Edmonton women have it worse than men in any other major Canadian city, according to a study released Wednesday. Quebec City dominated the ranks at number one.
In the Media by Gene Kosowan

New study finds casual pot use alters the brain

Young adults who occasionally use pot show abnormalities in two key areas of their brain related to emotion, motivation, and decision making, new research reveals.

Heart attack care slower for women and men with feminine traits

Findings published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal this week reveal men get quicker care for heart attack than women. The reasons aren't entirely clear, but may have to do with lack of assertiveness in describing heart attack symptoms.
In the Media by Kathleen Blanchard - 2 comments

Caffeine could improve memory

Drinking coffee straight after studying might help people remember information later, a new study suggests. With drinking coffee before studying, there was no improvement.
In the Media by Tim Sandle - 2 comments

Canadian researchers: Use infant sleep machines with caution

A Canadian study published in the journal Pediatrics suggests white noise machines used to help infants sleep could lead to hearing loss later on. Infant sleep machines should be used with caution the researchers warn.
In the Media by Kathleen Blanchard

U.S. drift study backs Marshalls castaway's remarkable tale

Majuro - A U.S. study of the prevailing wind and current conditions during the 13 months castaway Jose Salvador Alvarenga claimed to be at sea supports his remarkable tale of having drifted 8,000 miles across the Pacific.
In the Media by AFP

Japan study looks to big data for signs of Alzheimer's

Tokyo - Researchers in Japan will trawl through huge amounts of data to search for possible precursors to Alzheimer's Disease in a bid to identify who might develop a condition affecting millions around the world.The study, which involves the healthcare arm of...
In the Media by AFP

Emotions like love can affect taste

London - Does it seem like your favorite meal or dessert tastes better now that you're in love? You're not imagining it. A new study shows that a variety of emotions, including love can affect how a variety of food and drinks taste -- even water.
In the Media by Mike White - 1 comment

Major donation for cancer research

Six U.S. scientific and medical institutions will split a $540 million donation to study cancer immunotherapy and other related areas.
In the Media by Tim Sandle - 5 comments

The 'King of Beasts' threatened by extinction in Western Africa

Plagued by underfunding, little governmental support, poaching and indiscriminate killing by cattle herders, many of the countries in Western Africa have little control or incentive to save the few remaining western African lions left in the wild.
In the Media by Karen Graham - 1 comment
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Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for ...
Wikimedia commons
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for decades.
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A new study suggests obese humans could get the same benefits as exercise from mild body vibrations.
Bing
A new study suggests obese humans could get the same benefits as exercise from mild body vibrations.
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Charlton Heston and Ronald Reagan at a meeting in the White House. Both of them would later be diagn...
White House Photo Office
Charlton Heston and Ronald Reagan at a meeting in the White House. Both of them would later be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Photo taken: June 15, 1981
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Untitled
Wikimedia Commons
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Methane burns as it escapes through a hole in the ice in a lagoon above the East Siberian Arctic She...
Photo courtesy of Natalia Shakhova
Methane burns as it escapes through a hole in the ice in a lagoon above the East Siberian Arctic Shelf.
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Spectrogram of pink noise (left) and white noise (right)  shown with linear frequency axis (vertical...
Wikimedia commons
Spectrogram of pink noise (left) and white noise (right), shown with linear frequency axis (vertical)
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Salvador Dalí (1904–1989)  Study for “The Image Disappears ” 1938. Pencil on paper © Salvad...
Museum Associates/ LACMA, by Michael Tropea
Salvador Dalí (1904–1989), Study for “The Image Disappears,” 1938. Pencil on paper © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2012 Photo © 2012 Museum Associates/ LACMA, by Michael Tropea, Private Collection.
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Students studying for an exam
Albeiro Rodas
Students studying for an exam
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This is an interview with Abha Parajulee about the study done with University of Toronto PhD supervi...
University of Toronto, Scarborough
This is an interview with Abha Parajulee about the study done with University of Toronto PhD supervisor Frank Wania: Evaluating Officially Reported Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emissions in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region with a Multimedia Fate Model.
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Untitled
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StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
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This graphic was created based on word frequency to call attention to global climate change.
Woodley Wonderworks
This graphic was created based on word frequency to call attention to global climate change.
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StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
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99 Days of Freedom emotional case study.
Just B.V. Creative Communications Agency
99 Days of Freedom emotional case study.
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