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Study News

Study: Short men and overweight women get raw deal in life

A study has revealed that short men and overweight women get a raw deal in life, in jobs and in income. Short men are not the only ones getting a raw deal, as the study shows overweight women are too.

New discovery help scientists take a leap in fight against cancer

Scientists from the University College London (UCL) Cancer Institute made a groundbreaking discovery in fight against cancer. A new cellular target has been found that greatly increases the ability of the immune system to destroy cancer cells.

Coke/Pepsi fund study claiming diet soda is better than water

Bristol - In 2014, producers of soft drinks funded a study that concluded diet soda was better for losing weight than water. The companies are at again, as they have funded another study.

How Black Americans face discrimination from mortgage lenders Special

A new study concluded African American endure discrimination from mortgage lenders, right from the information-gathering stage via an introductory email.

Study says more U.S. women own video game consoles than men

A new report has revealed more games consoles are owned by women than by men in the United States. The study found that 42 percent of women have a console in their house compared to 37 percent of men.

'Nearly all' children under 4 use mobile devices on a daily basis

A U.S. study of mobile device usage by children under the age of 4 has concluded that they are faced with "almost universal exposure" to digital devices and most will have their own device by the time they turn four.

Autism is being overdiagnosed, says study

On Friday, government researchers in the United States reported that autism may be overdiagnosed in as many as 9 percent of kids.

Study highlights importance of bats for rare frog, other species

Knoxville - A tiny and rare species of frog living in remote, hidden caves in the heavily forested mountains near Russia and Georgia depends on bats for its survival, according to a recent study.

Study shows full bladder makes people better liars

People who have full bladders may be more convincing when they tell lies. That is according to a new California State University study.

British universities tumble down global league tables

British universities have tumbled down the latest league tables, with only Cambridge in the top five. However, the metrics used for assessing the placements have recently been changed.

Study claims half the world's sea turtles have eaten plastic

A new study was released and it claims that half of the planet's sea turtles have eaten some form of plastic at some point in their lives.

Report: Android lock screen patterns are surprisingly predictable

Security researchers have found that many lock screen patterns used by Android smartphone owners are as predictable as simple passwords like "1234567". Most people adhere to several common traits when making a pattern which dramatically reduces security.

Hackers could go on a easy spending spree with contactless cards

The UK's Which? consumer research group has found that contactless payment cards can be easily hacked using homemade technology. The card details can be stolen and then used to pay for goods online without further verification.

Google harms consumers and itself by promoting its own content

A new study has concluded that Google harms consumers by filtering search results so that listings for its own services are promoted to the tops of pages. It adds more fuel to the EU's recent accusation of Google engaging in anticompetitive practices.

'Extreme' music makes you more positive, study suggests

A new study has discovered that listening to "extreme music" like heavy metal can actually make one more positive. The recent study suggests that "extreme music" can help you calm down and feel inspired.

Computer solves 120-year-old mystery of worms in three days

A computer has solved a mystery that has been puzzling scientists for over 120 years in just three days. Using complex predictive simulation software, the system managed to explain how sliced-up worms turn into independent organisms.

Dinosaurs really were warm-blooded, study suggests

Dinosaurs grew quickly and were warm-blooded just like modern mammals, says a scientist who researched the metabolism of these ancient creatures.

Procrastinate at work? It’s bad for your health

Procrastination is a nasty habit that can keep you from filing on deadline, preparing well for a meeting. Waiting until the last minute to accomplish your task can also lead to unnecessary stress.

Scientific study reveals which diet programs work and don't work

A scientific study has revealed that most commercial diet programs can't provide one scrap of evidence that they work. After extensive analysis, the researchers have concluded that only two diet programs can be considered to be really effective.

Early issues with Apple Pay are putting off users, says study

A study has revealed that early issues with Apple Pay are causing many earlier patriots to neglect regular use of the service. 47% of users have experienced issues in stores advertised as Apple Pay friendly.

New major study finds magnets can control heat and sound

Researchers at the Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with magnetic fields, proving that both heat and sound have magnetic properties.

DNA study: Why the Welsh might be the first true Brits

The English aren't English and the real Britons are the Welsh, says a fascinating new study into the DNA of different ethnic groups in Britain.

Study suggests nose is better than eyes at identifying suspects

The standard method of identifying criminals via the eyewitness lineup may be about to change because a recent study suggests the human nose may be more effective at identifying bad guys than the human eye.

Research shows how climate change is impacting food safety

While there is controversy over the magnitude of its effects, climate change is having an indisputable impact on our food production, supply chain, food safety and the prevalence of foodborne diseases.

Op-Ed: Technology makes education more accessible than ever

The advent of the digital era has revolutionized education and learning for millions of children worldwide, enabling greater collaboration between teachers and pupils and bringing education to places where it was never available via virtual classrooms.

India's tiger census success story may be inaccurate, study says

New Delhi - The accuracy of India's recent tiger census that suggested tiger numbers have increased is now being called into question by a new study. The Indian government had celebrated the rise in tiger numbers from 1706 in 2011 to 2,226 in 2014.

Coffee could lower risk of endometrial cancer

New research has found a link between regularly drinking coffee and a 20% decreased risk of endometrial cancer which currently affects around 1 in 37 US women in their lifetime, adding to the potential health benefits of consuming the popular beverage.

Study finds ties between food security and diabetes

A new study has found that people without a secure source of food and medication are more likely to have less control over their diabetes when compared to people who don’t have concerns over this issue.

Polar bear collars, tranquilizers don't do lasting harm: Study

Polar bears don't suffer any long-term harm when they are shot with tranquilizer darts, briefly handled, and fitted with radio collars, even if the bear is captured up to 10 times, according to a new study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Study: BP spill left Rhode Island-sized oil ring on sea floor

When the devastating environmental disaster of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in 2010, nearly 200 million barrels of oil went missing, and scientists long wondered where the oil went. Now, part of that question has been answered.
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Study Image

Glyphosate use by crop in 2012.
Glyphosate use by crop in 2012.
USGS
The River Benue looking south east from Jimeta/Yola  Nigeria.
The River Benue looking south east from Jimeta/Yola, Nigeria.
Amjaca
Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View.
Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View.
U.S. Department of Energy
Methane burns as it escapes through a hole in the ice in a lagoon above the East Siberian Arctic She...
Methane burns as it escapes through a hole in the ice in a lagoon above the East Siberian Arctic Shelf.
Photo courtesy of Natalia Shakhova
Students studying for an exam
Students studying for an exam
Albeiro Rodas
A new study suggests obese humans could get the same benefits as exercise from mild body vibrations.
A new study suggests obese humans could get the same benefits as exercise from mild body vibrations.
SGUM
The Hispaniolan Hutia is now being followed using GPS and radio telemetry to study its distribution ...
The Hispaniolan Hutia is now being followed using GPS and radio telemetry to study its distribution and home range.
Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund
This is an interview with Abha Parajulee about the study done with University of Toronto PhD supervi...
This is an interview with Abha Parajulee about the study done with University of Toronto PhD supervisor Frank Wania: Evaluating Officially Reported Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emissions in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region with a Multimedia Fate Model.
University of Toronto, Scarborough
Untitled
Johns Hopkins University
Humanity is rapidly depleting a third of the world s largest groundwater aquifers.
Humanity is rapidly depleting a third of the world's largest groundwater aquifers.
Wochit News
Monthly time series from 2005 to 2013; colors indicate the phases of ENSO and the incidence of snake...
Monthly time series from 2005 to 2013; colors indicate the phases of ENSO and the incidence of snakebites in Costa Rico.
L.F. Chaves, et. al.
Massachusetts plans to establish a protected habitat for the state s timber rattlesnakes.
Massachusetts plans to establish a protected habitat for the state's timber rattlesnakes.
Screen grab
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for ...
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for decades.
Wikimedia commons
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
Feminine hygiene products used in study.
Feminine hygiene products used in study.
Dereacho Zapatillas
Gram stain of the bacteria Bordetella pertussis.
Gram stain of the bacteria Bordetella pertussis.
CDC
Spectrogram of pink noise (left) and white noise (right)  shown with linear frequency axis (vertical...
Spectrogram of pink noise (left) and white noise (right), shown with linear frequency axis (vertical)
Wikimedia commons
MIT Building 10 and the Great Dome  Cambridge Massachusetts.
MIT Building 10 and the Great Dome, Cambridge Massachusetts.
John Phelan
Map showing study areas used by Dr. Michael Hendryx. Over 1184 individuals were involved in the rese...
Map showing study areas used by Dr. Michael Hendryx. Over 1184 individuals were involved in the research.
Michael Hendrix