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Study News

Study: Parental involvement is key for child school success

Plymouth - Parental involvement plays key role in children's academic attainment, according to a new academic study. This is something that is independent of the child’s age or socio-economic status.

Op-Ed: Smartphones leading to 'horns-in-the-head' study is flawed

There's a lot of serious research about smartphone use and health effects, but one piece of research, essentially linking cellphone use to hornlike protuberances on the back of millennials' skulls, has been dismissed by the academic community.

Science: Listening to music while working impairs creativity

Lancaster - Should you listen to music while you are working? For many this is down to individual preference, and many find music helps develop the muse. New research, however, finds that, overall, playing music whilst working inhibits the creative tide.

One more reason not to pick your nose: pneumonia

Paris - Parents exasperated by their children constantly ignoring pleas to stop picking their noses, may have finally found an argument to break the habit: it might give you pneumonia.

World must slash meat consumption to save climate: study

Paris - The world must drastically reduce its meat consumption in order to avoid devastating climate change, scientists said Wednesday in the most thorough study so far on how what we eat affects the environment.

Innovative computer science degree program launched

Toronto - The cloud-based, multi-channel commerce platform, Shopify has partnered with Toronto's York University to expand its innovative computer science program called Dev Degree.

Want to know about AI? There’s a course for that

It’s hard to avoid discussion about artificial intelligence these days and each day brings a new article about the latest application. For those wishing to no more about the emerging technology, a new course has been launched.

Why it’s important to redress gender STEM balance: Interview Special

Ottawa - A recent survey on Canadian students’ and parents’ attitude towards coding highlights a significant gender gap across the board when it comes to involvement in STEM. To understand why Jennifer Flanagan, of the charity Actua, gives some answers.

Blockchain studies added to university curriculum

As blockchain technology gains in popularity, are universities willing to offer blockchain courses and degrees? The answer appears to be yes, at least for an instiution in Russia.

Mining 3.5 billion tweets confirms sunny weather makes us happier

The largest study of its kind has demonstrated that good weather makes people feel happier by analysing over three billion Facebook and Twitter posts made over a seven-year period. The volume of data assessed for the study far exceeds previous attempts.

W. Europe had less than 1% of terror victims in 2016: study

Paris - Western Europe accounted for less than one percent of the 34,676 people killed in terror attacks in 2016 and only two percent of attacks, according to a new report.

Australia vitamin 'breakthrough' to cut miscarriages, birth defects

Sydney - Taking a common vitamin supplement could significantly reduce the number of miscarriages and birth defects worldwide, Australian scientists said Thursday, in what they described as a major breakthrough in pregnancy research.

Study finds most people don't want to see friends' holiday photos

Aviva, an insurance company based in the United Kingdom, conducted survey about sharing vacation photos via Facebook. It turns out most users don't want to see their 'friends' vacation photos.

Pollen can impair performance of school kids

Oslo - Hay fever is an unpleasant allergy, varying in severity. The allergy affects many people as they go about their lives and this includes school children. The extent of the problem has been examined in a new study.

Research shows we touch our cell phones 2,617 times per day

It sometimes seems as if our phones function like an extra limb on our bodies and now, research demonstrates exactly how attached to the devices we really are.

Study: Short men and overweight women get raw deal in life

A study has revealed that short men and overweight women get a raw deal in life, in jobs and in income. Short men are not the only ones getting a raw deal, as the study shows overweight women are too.

New discovery help scientists take a leap in fight against cancer

Scientists from the University College London (UCL) Cancer Institute made a groundbreaking discovery in fight against cancer. A new cellular target has been found that greatly increases the ability of the immune system to destroy cancer cells.

Coke/Pepsi fund study claiming diet soda is better than water

Bristol - In 2014, producers of soft drinks funded a study that concluded diet soda was better for losing weight than water. The companies are at again, as they have funded another study.

How Black Americans face discrimination from mortgage lenders Special

A new study concluded African American endure discrimination from mortgage lenders, right from the information-gathering stage via an introductory email.

Study says more U.S. women own video game consoles than men

A new report has revealed more games consoles are owned by women than by men in the United States. The study found that 42 percent of women have a console in their house compared to 37 percent of men.

'Nearly all' children under 4 use mobile devices on a daily basis

A U.S. study of mobile device usage by children under the age of 4 has concluded that they are faced with "almost universal exposure" to digital devices and most will have their own device by the time they turn four.

Autism is being overdiagnosed, says study

On Friday, government researchers in the United States reported that autism may be overdiagnosed in as many as 9 percent of kids.

Study highlights importance of bats for rare frog, other species

Knoxville - A tiny and rare species of frog living in remote, hidden caves in the heavily forested mountains near Russia and Georgia depends on bats for its survival, according to a recent study.

Study shows full bladder makes people better liars

People who have full bladders may be more convincing when they tell lies. That is according to a new California State University study.

British universities tumble down global league tables

British universities have tumbled down the latest league tables, with only Cambridge in the top five. However, the metrics used for assessing the placements have recently been changed.

Study claims half the world's sea turtles have eaten plastic

A new study was released and it claims that half of the planet's sea turtles have eaten some form of plastic at some point in their lives.

Report: Android lock screen patterns are surprisingly predictable

Security researchers have found that many lock screen patterns used by Android smartphone owners are as predictable as simple passwords like "1234567". Most people adhere to several common traits when making a pattern which dramatically reduces security.

Hackers could go on a easy spending spree with contactless cards

The UK's Which? consumer research group has found that contactless payment cards can be easily hacked using homemade technology. The card details can be stolen and then used to pay for goods online without further verification.

Google harms consumers and itself by promoting its own content

A new study has concluded that Google harms consumers by filtering search results so that listings for its own services are promoted to the tops of pages. It adds more fuel to the EU's recent accusation of Google engaging in anticompetitive practices.

'Extreme' music makes you more positive, study suggests

A new study has discovered that listening to "extreme music" like heavy metal can actually make one more positive. The recent study suggests that "extreme music" can help you calm down and feel inspired.
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Charlton Heston and Ronald Reagan at a meeting in the White House. Both of them would later be diagn...
Charlton Heston and Ronald Reagan at a meeting in the White House. Both of them would later be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Photo taken: June 15, 1981
White House Photo Office
Untitled
Johns Hopkins University
99 Days of Freedom emotional case study.
99 Days of Freedom emotional case study.
Just B.V. Creative Communications Agency
Map showing study areas used by Dr. Michael Hendryx. Over 1184 individuals were involved in the rese...
Map showing study areas used by Dr. Michael Hendryx. Over 1184 individuals were involved in the research.
Michael Hendrix
A northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon)  which was captured in 2009 from an island in western Lake ...
A northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon), which was captured in 2009 from an island in western Lake Erie, Ohio. The snake has crusty and thickened scales over raised blisters, a sign of snake fungal disease.
D. E. Green/USGS National Wildlife Health Center
Untitled
Bowman et.al.
This graphic was created based on word frequency to call attention to global climate change.
This graphic was created based on word frequency to call attention to global climate change.
Woodley Wonderworks
Students studying for an exam
Students studying for an exam
Albeiro Rodas
The River Benue looking south east from Jimeta/Yola  Nigeria.
The River Benue looking south east from Jimeta/Yola, Nigeria.
Amjaca
: Primula clevelandii (formerly Dodecatheon clevelandii) — Padre s Shooting Star.
On the Backbone ...
: Primula clevelandii (formerly Dodecatheon clevelandii) — Padre's Shooting Star. On the Backbone Trail, at Circle X Ranch Park — in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, California.
National Park Service
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
The Hispaniolan Hutia is now being followed using GPS and radio telemetry to study its distribution ...
The Hispaniolan Hutia is now being followed using GPS and radio telemetry to study its distribution and home range.
Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund
Monthly time series from 2005 to 2013; colors indicate the phases of ENSO and the incidence of snake...
Monthly time series from 2005 to 2013; colors indicate the phases of ENSO and the incidence of snakebites in Costa Rico.
L.F. Chaves, et. al.
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
StudyWorld 2010 at the Russian House of Culture and Science in Berlin
Genetic origins of Paleo-Eskimos and Neo-Eskimos.
Genetic origins of Paleo-Eskimos and Neo-Eskimos.
E. Willerslev
This eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) has opaque eyes and hard  crusty scales on its ...
This eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) has opaque eyes and hard, crusty scales on its snout, telltale signs of snake fungal disease.
D. E. Green/USGS National Wildlife Health Center
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for ...
Scientists have determined rare California condors are being harmed by DDT that has been banned for decades.
Wikimedia commons
Salvador Dalí (1904–1989)  Study for “The Image Disappears ” 1938. Pencil on paper © Salvad...
Salvador Dalí (1904–1989), Study for “The Image Disappears,” 1938. Pencil on paper © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2012 Photo © 2012 Museum Associates/ LACMA, by Michael Tropea, Private Collection.
Museum Associates/ LACMA, by Michael Tropea
Glyphosate use by crop in 2012.
Glyphosate use by crop in 2012.
USGS
Untitled
Photo by Annie Spratt

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