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Science News

Belgian town wants World Press Photo award withdrawn

Brussels - The mayor of Charleroi has said the award of a World Press Photo prize to a study on the gritty industrial Belgian town should be withdrawn as a "serious distortion of reality.

Russia confirms will use International Space Station till 2024

Moscow - Russia will continue using the International Space Station along with NASA until 2024, its space agency said, after Moscow had threatened to stop financing it in 2020.

The perils of publication, scientist in dispute with journal

Sao Pedro D'aldeia - The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers. This is a rare activity within the science world.

Size matters: Evolution helps sea creatures, land animals get big

Stanford - A recent study suggests that sea creatures may follow a hypothesis known as "Cope's rule," and this rule states that in a lineage, animals grow larger in the passage of time.

Ghost super moon on February 18th will not be visible

The first "Super" moon of 2015 will rise on Feb. 18th. As the moon rises it will be a rare "Super New Moon" which means the moon will not be visible.

Obama seeks big science boost

Washington - The fiscal year 2016 could be promising for scientific research if the President Obama's budgetary requests are granted.

Op-Ed: Nanotechnology likely to be the next big technological revolution

Is technological progress slowing down? Are we simply refining technological advances originally made in the 1980s or earlier? Fear not: there is a next wave that will revolutionize technology. And it's small. Real small. A look at nanotechnology.

E-cigarettes 'may still harm the lungs and immune system'

New research has suggested that e-cigarette vapour contains toxic chemicals that are damaging to the body, implying they are not a safe alternative to traditional smoking and adding to the continuing debate about the health risks of "vaping."

New eyeglass lenses go from clear to shaded when you want them to

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have a solution for changing between clear and shaded eyeglasses, quickly, without the long changeover time of transitional lenses.

Science publications enter into merger mega-deal

London - Major science publisher Macmillan Science and Education, the publisher of Nature and Scientific American, is to join forces with Springer Science+Business Media.

Canadian trade ties to India set to rise Special

Partnership agreements in science and technology were signed by Canadian delegates in last week's summit in Gujarat, India.

How fast must Santa travel to reach every home?

During Christmas Eve Santa performs a number of herculean feats as he seeks to distribute gifts to many of the good boys and girls around the world. Is this physically possible? Maybe, Digital Journal assesses how.

Federal funding cuts hit U.S. scientific research hard

Washington - The U.S. legislature has passed a spending agreement for science for next year. The deal signals only modest increases for federal science agencies.

Sony to release 'Interview' after hack attack

Los Angeles - Sony Pictures says it will screen madcap comedy "The Interview" in some US theaters on Christmas Day, a dramatic U-turn after its widely criticized decision to cancel the film following a cyber-assault blamed on North Korea.

The 'science' behind Christmas — Part 2

To close out an interesting year in science, Digital Journal brings you another round of the "science behind Christmas" features.

'DNA from the crypt' solves mystery of how birds lost their teeth

Riverside - Thanks to "DNA from the crypt" scientists now have powerful evidence that the lack of teeth in all modern birds can be traced to a common ancestor who became toothless in paradise about 116 million years ago.

Mars once had a massive lake, NASA reports

According to reports released by NASA, Mars' Gale Crater once contained a massive lake. NASA presented evidence that also suggests the lake existed for millions of years, long enough to sustain life.

Review: Sy Montgomery delivers on 'The Tarantula Scientist' book Special

"The Tarantula Scientist" by acclaimed author Sy Montgomery is an award-winning informational children's book on tarantulas.

European Union cuts its most senior science role

The European Commission (EC) decided to retire the position of Chief Scientific Advisor, Some scientists have reacted angrily to what they see is political interference with the promotion of science.

Bad weather delays Japan asteroid probe lift off

Toukyo - Bad weather will delay the launch of a Japanese space probe on a six-year mission to mine a distant asteroid, just weeks after a European spacecraft's historic landing on a comet captivated the world.

Digital Journal's top science stories of 2014 Special

2014 has seen a myriad of fascinating science news. Digital Journal looks back at the year in science and selects the 12 most interesting stories that have impacted people's lives around the world.

Lost languages leave a mark on the brain

Washington - Babies adopted across international borders may not remember the language they heard in their first days, but the words leave a lasting mark on their minds, scientists said Monday.

Op-Ed: Traditional sex-ed replaced with dolphins and ducklings in Turkey

Sixth graders in Turkish schools will no longer learn about human genitalia anatomy and reproduction, sparking controversy over the censorship.

Italy quake experts win appeal in 'science on trial' case

Rome - Seven Italian scientists who faced jail for failing to predict a deadly 2009 earthquake were cleared Monday of manslaughter convictions that had sparked international outrageThe seven men were sentenced to six years in jail in October 2012 after a cour...

Is sexism in science at an end?

While female scientists in academia do not face an inhospitable workplace, the low numbers of female faculty are simply due to women’s career choices. This is the view of two psychologists.

New drug combination causes cancer cells to 'self-destruct'

Liverpool - Researchers in the United Kingdom have discovered a drug combination that triggers a self-destruct mechanism in lung cancer cells.

Using cigarette ash to remove arsenic from water

In a novel approach to filtering water, researchers in China and Saudi Arabia have come up with a way of using ash from cigarettes to remove arsenic from drinking water.

Americans conflicted on whether or not we should contact aliens

If aliens exist, should we try to get in touch with them? According to a new poll, many Americans think it would be a bad idea.

Columbia University pays out in fraud claim

Columbia University university is to pay out over $9 million to resolve a lawsuit filed by the U.S. government over the submission of false claims regarding federal research funds.

Journalist awarded for promoting science

Emily Willingham, a U.S.-based biologist and freelance journalist, together with David Robert Grimes, a cancer researcher, has been awarded the 2014 John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science.
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Science Image

A computer model of the cocaine enzyme used in this study. It has shown some impressive results so f...
A computer model of the cocaine enzyme used in this study. It has shown some impressive results so far.
Jawahar Swaminathan
Geothermal steam is one of many ways scientists propose to power the earth. However one team at MIT ...
Geothermal steam is one of many ways scientists propose to power the earth. However one team at MIT has found a new way to turn sunlight into steam.
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Science of Christmas: Ho  Ho  Ho
Science of Christmas: Ho, Ho, Ho
CsCharms
 Annoying  - The science of what bugs us  by Joe Placa & Flora Lichtman
"Annoying" - The science of what bugs us, by Joe Placa & Flora Lichtman
Mouse embryos are commonly used in scientific research. A team of researchers believe they created a...
Mouse embryos are commonly used in scientific research. A team of researchers believe they created a process to regress evolution using these.
Pazit Polak
The South Kensington Science Museum actually has an example of a genome sequence on display. As you ...
The South Kensington Science Museum actually has an example of a genome sequence on display. As you can see there is a huge amount of information in the genetic structure of each living being. Some believe this may hold the key to fighting aging.
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With new planets being discovered constantly life could show up when we least expect it.
With new planets being discovered constantly life could show up when we least expect it.
Unmismoobjetivo
This chart shows the reality of believing and not believing in our Lord and Savior.
This chart shows the reality of believing and not believing in our Lord and Savior.
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inventorspot.com
This diagram shows the normal interaction of stem cells. A study made some outrageous claims on what...
This diagram shows the normal interaction of stem cells. A study made some outrageous claims on what they could do with this cycle and they were called on it.
Mike Jones via Wikimedia
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Looking for an idea to include the kids in the gardening fun or a project to keep them occupied for the summer. Check back for step by step instructions on how to grow square watermelon for just a few dollars.
Watermelons
A picture of a typical lab rat.
A picture of a typical lab rat.
Jean-Etienne Poirrier
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Photo by: Dr. David Midgley Cultures: Dr. David Midgley University of Sydney, Australia
Ira Katznelson  professor of political science and history at Columbia University
Ira Katznelson, professor of political science and history at Columbia University
PR / Hunter College
Science on a Sphere - Smithsonian Natural History
Science on a Sphere - Smithsonian Natural History
woodleywonderworks
Muscle stem cells growing in a nutrient gel  on velcro.
Muscle stem cells growing in a nutrient gel, on velcro.
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Krypton gas is beautiful but also quite dangerous under certain circumstances.
Jurii
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Shutterstock
CohIT: The healthcare IT industry in Berlin
CohIT: The healthcare IT industry in Berlin
Museum of Science and Industry
Photo credit: Joe Ziolkowski
Museum of Science and Industry Photo credit: Joe Ziolkowski
The Museum of Science an Industry