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Science News

'DNA from the crypt' solves mystery of how birds lost their teeth

Riverside - Thanks to "DNA from the crypt" scientists now have powerful evidence that the lack of teeth in all modern birds can be traced to a common ancestor who became toothless in paradise about 116 million years ago.

Mars once had a massive lake, NASA reports

According to reports released by NASA, Mars' Gale Crater once contained a massive lake. NASA presented evidence that also suggests the lake existed for millions of years, long enough to sustain life.

Review: Sy Montgomery delivers on 'The Tarantula Scientist' book Special

"The Tarantula Scientist" by acclaimed author Sy Montgomery is an award-winning informational children's book on tarantulas.

European Union cuts its most senior science role

The European Commission (EC) decided to retire the position of Chief Scientific Advisor, Some scientists have reacted angrily to what they see is political interference with the promotion of science.

Bad weather delays Japan asteroid probe lift off

Toukyo - Bad weather will delay the launch of a Japanese space probe on a six-year mission to mine a distant asteroid, just weeks after a European spacecraft's historic landing on a comet captivated the world.

Digital Journal's top science stories of 2014 Special

2014 has seen a myriad of fascinating science news. Digital Journal looks back at the year in science and selects the 12 most interesting stories that have impacted people's lives around the world.

Lost languages leave a mark on the brain

Washington - Babies adopted across international borders may not remember the language they heard in their first days, but the words leave a lasting mark on their minds, scientists said Monday.

Op-Ed: Traditional sex-ed replaced with dolphins and ducklings in Turkey

Sixth graders in Turkish schools will no longer learn about human genitalia anatomy and reproduction, sparking controversy over the censorship.

Italy quake experts win appeal in 'science on trial' case

Rome - Seven Italian scientists who faced jail for failing to predict a deadly 2009 earthquake were cleared Monday of manslaughter convictions that had sparked international outrageThe seven men were sentenced to six years in jail in October 2012 after a cour...

Is sexism in science at an end?

While female scientists in academia do not face an inhospitable workplace, the low numbers of female faculty are simply due to women’s career choices. This is the view of two psychologists.

New drug combination causes cancer cells to 'self-destruct'

Liverpool - Researchers in the United Kingdom have discovered a drug combination that triggers a self-destruct mechanism in lung cancer cells.

Using cigarette ash to remove arsenic from water

In a novel approach to filtering water, researchers in China and Saudi Arabia have come up with a way of using ash from cigarettes to remove arsenic from drinking water.

Americans conflicted on whether or not we should contact aliens

If aliens exist, should we try to get in touch with them? According to a new poll, many Americans think it would be a bad idea.

Columbia University pays out in fraud claim

Columbia University university is to pay out over $9 million to resolve a lawsuit filed by the U.S. government over the submission of false claims regarding federal research funds.

Journalist awarded for promoting science

Emily Willingham, a U.S.-based biologist and freelance journalist, together with David Robert Grimes, a cancer researcher, has been awarded the 2014 John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science.

Waterless washing machines are coming to the U.S.

Technology has finally caught up with the humble chore of washing clothes. New technology is allowing you to wash your clothes, without separating colors from whites, with just a small amount of water.

U.S. government spends $31 million for diversity in science

Bethesda - A dozen academic research groups have received substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health funding to improve the diversity of the American biomedical community.

Not just sci-fi, long-range tractor beam now a reality

Canberra - Two Australian laser physicists have developed the world's first first long-distance optical tractor beam, capable of not only attracting objects, but repelling them as well.

NASA discovers tiny galaxy some 13 billion lightyears from Earth

Pasadena - With the help of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered one of the farthest and smallest galaxies ever seen.

Fall is the time for foliage tours and raptor counts in Virginia

When autumn comes to Virginia, the mountains and valleys don their coat of many colors, giving the countryside a patchwork quilt appearance. This is also the time of year for the annual raptor watch when birds-of-prey are counted as they migrate south .

Op-Ed: When is 'extinct' really 'extinct'? The missing snail row

The Aldabra banded snail was last sighted in 1996 and declared extinct in 2007, with the blame placed squarely on climate change. However, it has since been "rediscovered." This has led to a debate about the accuracy of the original research.

Science movie tops Korean box office

Seoul - A movie based on the Woo Suk Hwang cloning scandal has proved to be popular in South Korea. The movie is called "Whistleblower." Although the movie is a hit, for some the events depicted drift a little from reality.

Asian cave paintings challenge Europe as cradle of art

Paris - The silhouette of a hand on a cave wall in Indonesia is 40,000 years old, showing that Europe was not the birthplace of art as long believed, researchers said on Wednesday.

Bob Dylan's lyrics crop up in published science papers

Freewheelin' Swedish scientists have been sneaking Bob Dylan lyrics into published science papers over several years. These "Jokermen" comprise of five academics, who place the lyrics in their research to amuse each other.

Baffling 1,000-year-old skull and jawbone washed up on beach

Sydney - Six years ago the 1,000-year-old skull of a toddler aged 3 to 5 washed up on a beach in Australia. Now the jawbone that matches the skull has also washed up, and scientists are still trying to find out who the child was and where the remains came from.

Ebola virus in the U.S. and contact tracing technology

Dallas - Contact tracing allows epidemiologists and others fighting the spread of dangerous diseases like the Ebola virus.Technological tools in surveillance and molecular diagnostics, information and communications, and geoinformatics make this tough job easier.

India wins Asia's race to Mars as spacecraft enters orbit

Bangalore - India won Asia's race to Mars on Wednesday when its unmanned Mangalyaan spacecraft successfully entered the Red Planet's orbit after a 10-month journey on a tiny budget.

World population may hit 11 billion by 2100

Washington - The world population may grow larger than previously estimated, reaching 11 billion people by century's end, according to a UN-led analysis published Thursday.

Last month was hottest August since 1880: NOAA

Washington - Last month was the hottest August on record for global average temperatures over land and ocean surfaces, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday.

Divers sure of new finds from 'ancient computer' shipwreck

Athens - Archaeologists set out Monday to use a revolutionary new deep sea diving suit to explore the ancient shipwreck where one of the most remarkable scientific objects of antiquity was found.
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Science Image

The NO molecule may be a useful additional factor for improving immune systems and dealing with infe...
The NO molecule may be a useful additional factor for improving immune systems and dealing with infection.
Benjah-bmm27
This is a screenshot of a message sent by Twitter user Wylde On Health in reply to one by Thamno.
This is a screenshot of a message sent by Twitter user Wylde On Health in reply to one by Thamno.
Doctors prefer to avoid any sort of brain surgery but in some cases  such as this one  there is no o...
Doctors prefer to avoid any sort of brain surgery but in some cases, such as this one, there is no other choice.
OpenStax College
A picture of what the ringwoodite in the mantle may look like.
A picture of what the ringwoodite in the mantle may look like.
Jasperox via Wikimedia
Untitled
Nick Kraus
Center Milky Way Galaxy
Center Milky Way Galaxy
Forest Glades I wander, on Flick'r
How NASA assets will observe Comet Siding Spring
How NASA assets will observe Comet Siding Spring
NASA
An example of a red super giant which should look similar to the star in question.
An example of a red super giant which should look similar to the star in question.
Tyrogthekreeper via Wikimedia
An impressive look at the jawline of a crocodile.
An impressive look at the jawline of a crocodile.
Raul654
Some of the bones one can view at the University of Guelph.
Some of the bones one can view at the University of Guelph.
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Photo by: Dr. David Midgley Cultures: Dr. David Midgley University of Sydney, Australia
A picture of the Kepler-10 star system where the planet was found.
A picture of the Kepler-10 star system where the planet was found.
Wikimedia Commons
The difference between science and religion
The difference between science and religion
DamnedIfGodExists
Cannabis oil comes in a variety of forms which deliver different levels of the drug to those who ing...
Cannabis oil comes in a variety of forms which deliver different levels of the drug to those who ingest it.
SgoG
An example of some nano-sized molecular machinery made with 3D models.
An example of some nano-sized molecular machinery made with 3D models.
NASA via Wikimedia Commons
Untitled
inventorspot.com
With new planets being discovered constantly life could show up when we least expect it.
With new planets being discovered constantly life could show up when we least expect it.
Unmismoobjetivo
A typical picture of a bulky pacemaker. We soon may have devices like these that are both tiny and e...
A typical picture of a bulky pacemaker. We soon may have devices like these that are both tiny and efficient.
Wikimedia Public Doman from the US Government
A chart showing the massive plunge recorded around the time the shark vanished.
A chart showing the massive plunge recorded around the time the shark vanished.
Smithsonian YouTube
An Acanthamoeba does not usually have a chance to do anything to a human eye. In this case it had se...
An Acanthamoeba does not usually have a chance to do anything to a human eye. In this case it had several months of opportunity to do something.
CDC