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Science News

Malaria vaccine offers partial protection: Final results

Paris - The world's most advanced malaria candidate vaccine offers young children partial protection that wanes with time, but could shield millions against the deadly parasite, its developers said Friday.

Scientists urge moratorium after Chinese 'edit' human embryos

Miami - Global scientists on Thursday renewed calls to halt controversial research to genetically edit human embryos after a Chinese team published details of a stunted but breakthrough attempt in this new frontier in science.

Canadian research team cracks secret to knuckle-popping sound

Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered the secret behind the “pop” sound knuckles make when they’re cracked. So, why does it make that sound? MRI video helps to determine what triggers the noise.

Russia to build own space station by 2023, says Putin

Moscow - Russia plans to build its own orbiting space station by 2023, President Vladimir Putin said Thursday during a marathon call-in session with the nation."By 2023, we plan to create our own national space station in orbit," Putin said.

U.S. to exhume remains from Pearl Harbor attack

Washington - The U.S. military plans to exhume the remains of 388 Americans killed in the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, in an unprecedented bid to identify troops using DNA testing, officials said Tuesday.

New aluminium battery charges phone in just one minute

Scientists have created a new battery that is capable of fully charging a smartphone in just one minute. Made of aluminium, it could replace today's lithium models in the future and is billed as being much safer too.

Large Hadron Collider starts up again after two-year upgrade

Ginebra - The world's largest particle smasher restarted Sunday after a two-year upgrade that will allow physicists to explore uncharted corners of what makes up the universe, including dark matter and antimatter.

Bioethics philosopher John Arras has died

The philosopher John Arras, who tackled important issues relating to the ethics of medical care, has passed away at age 69.

Op-Ed: Costs of doing science climbs in Argentina

Scientists in Argentina are struggling with budgets due to government tariffs which mean that most tools and reagents cost more than double their normal retail value.

Russia announces plan to build new space station with NASA

Moscow - Russia on Saturday announced initial plans to build a new orbital space station together with NASA to replace the International Space Station (ISS), which is set to operate until 2024.

Soyuz spacecraft docks at ISS for year-long mission

Baikonur - A Russian Soyuz spacecraft with three crew on board successfully docked at the International Space Station Saturday after blasting off from Kazakhstan, NASA said, launching a year-long mission on the orbiting outpost.

Soyuz spacecraft with Russian, U.S. astronauts docks at ISS

Baikonur - A Russian Soyuz spacecraft with three crew on board successfully docked with the International Space Station after blasting off from Kazakhstan, NASA said.

Dark matter is a fluid — Its particles aren't particles at all

The mystery of dark matter just got more mysterious. The latest research into the effects on dark matter of galaxy collisions, suggests that it may not be made up of particles, but is, instead, a fluid-like substance.

Apple's new iPhone research app poses ethical questions

Apple is launching a new data-sharing platform that can make any iPhone user a medical research participant. However, does this pose ethical issues?

Solar plane lands in Oman after 1st leg of round-the-world bid

Muscat - The Solar Impulse 2 landed Monday in Oman, completing the initial leg of its bid to become the first solar-powered plane to fly around the world, an AFP photographer said.

Plans to make scientific research more public

Washington D.c. - The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has described the process where the National Institutes of Health and related agencies will make scientific research results public.

Comatose girl's family files lawsuit against California hospital

Oakland - The family of a young girl whose heart stopped during routine surgery in 2013 and had to sue to prevent a Northern California hospital from turning off her life support has sued the medical facility for malpractice.

The loss of women from science has slowed down

A new study indicates that academic science no longer loses more women than men. Science, engineering and medical fields are losing male and female scientists equally.

Belgian town wants World Press Photo award withdrawn

Brussels - The mayor of Charleroi has said the award of a World Press Photo prize to a study on the gritty industrial Belgian town should be withdrawn as a "serious distortion of reality.

Russia confirms will use International Space Station till 2024

Moscow - Russia will continue using the International Space Station along with NASA until 2024, its space agency said, after Moscow had threatened to stop financing it in 2020.

The perils of publication, scientist in dispute with journal

Sao Pedro D'aldeia - The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers. This is a rare activity within the science world.

Size matters: Evolution helps sea creatures, land animals get big

Stanford - A recent study suggests that sea creatures may follow a hypothesis known as "Cope's rule," and this rule states that in a lineage, animals grow larger in the passage of time.

Ghost super moon on February 18th will not be visible

The first "Super" moon of 2015 will rise on Feb. 18th. As the moon rises it will be a rare "Super New Moon" which means the moon will not be visible.

Obama seeks big science boost

Washington - The fiscal year 2016 could be promising for scientific research if the President Obama's budgetary requests are granted.

Op-Ed: Nanotechnology likely to be the next big technological revolution

Is technological progress slowing down? Are we simply refining technological advances originally made in the 1980s or earlier? Fear not: there is a next wave that will revolutionize technology. And it's small. Real small. A look at nanotechnology.

E-cigarettes 'may still harm the lungs and immune system'

New research has suggested that e-cigarette vapour contains toxic chemicals that are damaging to the body, implying they are not a safe alternative to traditional smoking and adding to the continuing debate about the health risks of "vaping."

New eyeglass lenses go from clear to shaded when you want them to

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have a solution for changing between clear and shaded eyeglasses, quickly, without the long changeover time of transitional lenses.

Science publications enter into merger mega-deal

London - Major science publisher Macmillan Science and Education, the publisher of Nature and Scientific American, is to join forces with Springer Science+Business Media.

Canadian trade ties to India set to rise Special

Partnership agreements in science and technology were signed by Canadian delegates in last week's summit in Gujarat, India.

How fast must Santa travel to reach every home?

During Christmas Eve Santa performs a number of herculean feats as he seeks to distribute gifts to many of the good boys and girls around the world. Is this physically possible? Maybe, Digital Journal assesses how.
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Science Image

Untitled
inventorspot.com
A normal Dobsonfly shows off its mandibles. These are actually used in mating as the insect prefers ...
A normal Dobsonfly shows off its mandibles. These are actually used in mating as the insect prefers to evade predators. Larger specimens have larger mandibles as well.
Dehaan
Artist s impression of Comet Siding Spring passing before Mars
Artist's impression of Comet Siding Spring passing before Mars
NASA
The NO molecule may be a useful additional factor for improving immune systems and dealing with infe...
The NO molecule may be a useful additional factor for improving immune systems and dealing with infection.
Benjah-bmm27
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Fungi growing in axenic culture (ascomycetes)
Photo by: Dr. David Midgley Cultures: Dr. David Midgley University of Sydney, Australia
Some of the bones one can view at the University of Guelph.
Some of the bones one can view at the University of Guelph.
File photo: Scientist at work in Dr Sandle s laboratory
File photo: Scientist at work in Dr Sandle's laboratory
When viewed closely an Australian jellyfish is a bit unnerving.
When viewed closely an Australian jellyfish is a bit unnerving.
Michael Coghlan
Wylde On Health claims that the world was flat 200 years ago.
Wylde On Health claims that the world was flat 200 years ago.
In the anti-laser  incoming light waves are trapped in a cavity where they bounce back and forth unt...
In the anti-laser, incoming light waves are trapped in a cavity where they bounce back and forth until they are eventually absorbed. Their energy is dissipated as heat.
Photo courtesy of Yale / Yidong Chong
Arvind Gupta teaching Indian children about science
Arvind Gupta teaching Indian children about science
Courtesy Arvind Gupta
An impressive look at the jawline of a crocodile.
An impressive look at the jawline of a crocodile.
Raul654
Untitled
NASA Goddard
A picture of what the ringwoodite in the mantle may look like.
A picture of what the ringwoodite in the mantle may look like.
Jasperox via Wikimedia
This chart shows the reality of believing and not believing in our Lord and Savior.
This chart shows the reality of believing and not believing in our Lord and Savior.
A picture of a typical lab rat.
A picture of a typical lab rat.
Jean-Etienne Poirrier
An example of some nano-sized molecular machinery made with 3D models.
An example of some nano-sized molecular machinery made with 3D models.
NASA via Wikimedia Commons
Poster from a Canadian science campaign
Poster from a Canadian science campaign
With permission by Reuters / Chris Wattie
Krypton gas is beautiful but also quite dangerous under certain circumstances.
Krypton gas is beautiful but also quite dangerous under certain circumstances.
Jurii
The South Kensington Science Museum actually has an example of a genome sequence on display. As you ...
The South Kensington Science Museum actually has an example of a genome sequence on display. As you can see there is a huge amount of information in the genetic structure of each living being. Some believe this may hold the key to fighting aging.
George Gastin