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Science News

Op-Ed: Costs of doing science climbs in Argentina

Scientists in Argentina are struggling with budgets due to government tariffs which mean that most tools and reagents cost more than double their normal retail value.

Russia announces plan to build new space station with NASA

Moscow - Russia on Saturday announced initial plans to build a new orbital space station together with NASA to replace the International Space Station (ISS), which is set to operate until 2024.

Soyuz spacecraft docks at ISS for year-long mission

Baikonur - A Russian Soyuz spacecraft with three crew on board successfully docked at the International Space Station Saturday after blasting off from Kazakhstan, NASA said, launching a year-long mission on the orbiting outpost.

Soyuz spacecraft with Russian, U.S. astronauts docks at ISS

Baikonur - A Russian Soyuz spacecraft with three crew on board successfully docked with the International Space Station after blasting off from Kazakhstan, NASA said.

Dark matter is a fluid — Its particles aren't particles at all

The mystery of dark matter just got more mysterious. The latest research into the effects on dark matter of galaxy collisions, suggests that it may not be made up of particles, but is, instead, a fluid-like substance.

Apple's new iPhone research app poses ethical questions

Apple is launching a new data-sharing platform that can make any iPhone user a medical research participant. However, does this pose ethical issues?

Solar plane lands in Oman after 1st leg of round-the-world bid

Muscat - The Solar Impulse 2 landed Monday in Oman, completing the initial leg of its bid to become the first solar-powered plane to fly around the world, an AFP photographer said.

Plans to make scientific research more public

Washington D.c. - The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has described the process where the National Institutes of Health and related agencies will make scientific research results public.

Comatose girl's family files lawsuit against California hospital

Oakland - The family of a young girl whose heart stopped during routine surgery in 2013 and had to sue to prevent a Northern California hospital from turning off her life support has sued the medical facility for malpractice.

The loss of women from science has slowed down

A new study indicates that academic science no longer loses more women than men. Science, engineering and medical fields are losing male and female scientists equally.

Belgian town wants World Press Photo award withdrawn

Brussels - The mayor of Charleroi has said the award of a World Press Photo prize to a study on the gritty industrial Belgian town should be withdrawn as a "serious distortion of reality.

Russia confirms will use International Space Station till 2024

Moscow - Russia will continue using the International Space Station along with NASA until 2024, its space agency said, after Moscow had threatened to stop financing it in 2020.

The perils of publication, scientist in dispute with journal

Sao Pedro D'aldeia - The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers. This is a rare activity within the science world.

Size matters: Evolution helps sea creatures, land animals get big

Stanford - A recent study suggests that sea creatures may follow a hypothesis known as "Cope's rule," and this rule states that in a lineage, animals grow larger in the passage of time.

Ghost super moon on February 18th will not be visible

The first "Super" moon of 2015 will rise on Feb. 18th. As the moon rises it will be a rare "Super New Moon" which means the moon will not be visible.

Obama seeks big science boost

Washington - The fiscal year 2016 could be promising for scientific research if the President Obama's budgetary requests are granted.

Op-Ed: Nanotechnology likely to be the next big technological revolution

Is technological progress slowing down? Are we simply refining technological advances originally made in the 1980s or earlier? Fear not: there is a next wave that will revolutionize technology. And it's small. Real small. A look at nanotechnology.

E-cigarettes 'may still harm the lungs and immune system'

New research has suggested that e-cigarette vapour contains toxic chemicals that are damaging to the body, implying they are not a safe alternative to traditional smoking and adding to the continuing debate about the health risks of "vaping."

New eyeglass lenses go from clear to shaded when you want them to

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have a solution for changing between clear and shaded eyeglasses, quickly, without the long changeover time of transitional lenses.

Science publications enter into merger mega-deal

London - Major science publisher Macmillan Science and Education, the publisher of Nature and Scientific American, is to join forces with Springer Science+Business Media.

Canadian trade ties to India set to rise Special

Partnership agreements in science and technology were signed by Canadian delegates in last week's summit in Gujarat, India.

How fast must Santa travel to reach every home?

During Christmas Eve Santa performs a number of herculean feats as he seeks to distribute gifts to many of the good boys and girls around the world. Is this physically possible? Maybe, Digital Journal assesses how.

Federal funding cuts hit U.S. scientific research hard

Washington - The U.S. legislature has passed a spending agreement for science for next year. The deal signals only modest increases for federal science agencies.

Sony to release 'Interview' after hack attack

Los Angeles - Sony Pictures says it will screen madcap comedy "The Interview" in some US theaters on Christmas Day, a dramatic U-turn after its widely criticized decision to cancel the film following a cyber-assault blamed on North Korea.

The 'science' behind Christmas — Part 2

To close out an interesting year in science, Digital Journal brings you another round of the "science behind Christmas" features.

'DNA from the crypt' solves mystery of how birds lost their teeth

Riverside - Thanks to "DNA from the crypt" scientists now have powerful evidence that the lack of teeth in all modern birds can be traced to a common ancestor who became toothless in paradise about 116 million years ago.

Mars once had a massive lake, NASA reports

According to reports released by NASA, Mars' Gale Crater once contained a massive lake. NASA presented evidence that also suggests the lake existed for millions of years, long enough to sustain life.

Review: Sy Montgomery delivers on 'The Tarantula Scientist' book Special

"The Tarantula Scientist" by acclaimed author Sy Montgomery is an award-winning informational children's book on tarantulas.

European Union cuts its most senior science role

The European Commission (EC) decided to retire the position of Chief Scientific Advisor, Some scientists have reacted angrily to what they see is political interference with the promotion of science.

Bad weather delays Japan asteroid probe lift off

Toukyo - Bad weather will delay the launch of a Japanese space probe on a six-year mission to mine a distant asteroid, just weeks after a European spacecraft's historic landing on a comet captivated the world.
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 Annoying  - The science of what bugs us  by Joe Placa & Flora Lichtman
"Annoying" - The science of what bugs us, by Joe Placa & Flora Lichtman
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This painting of five men working together on a net by Louise Waterford reflects the potential found by both science and faith in building cognitive skills.
wikimedia commons
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This is a screenshot of a message sent by Twitter user Wylde On Health in reply to one by Thamno.
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Nick Kraus
This diagram shows the normal interaction of stem cells. A study made some outrageous claims on what...
This diagram shows the normal interaction of stem cells. A study made some outrageous claims on what they could do with this cycle and they were called on it.
Mike Jones via Wikimedia
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A picture of what the ringwoodite in the mantle may look like.
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A normal Dobsonfly shows off its mandibles. These are actually used in mating as the insect prefers to evade predators. Larger specimens have larger mandibles as well.
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CohIT: the healthcare IT industry in Berlin
CohIT: the healthcare IT industry in Berlin
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A typical picture of a bulky pacemaker. We soon may have devices like these that are both tiny and efficient.
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Looking for an idea to include the kids in the gardening fun or a project to keep them occupied for the summer. Check back for step by step instructions on how to grow square watermelon for just a few dollars.
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Science of Christmas: Ho, Ho, Ho
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A picture of the Kepler-10 star system where the planet was found.
A picture of the Kepler-10 star system where the planet was found.
Wikimedia Commons
LHC CMS ECAL Endcaps
LHC CMS ECAL Endcaps
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When viewed closely an Australian jellyfish is a bit unnerving.
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A chart showing the massive plunge recorded around the time the shark vanished.
Smithsonian YouTube
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Some of the bones one can view at the University of Guelph.
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Ebola particles are quite scary up close, but you should not buy into the fear right away.
NIAID