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Science News

Your cup of coffee is under threat from fungus and the climate

Coffee is the third most consumed beverage in the world, after water and tea, and is second only to oil as the globe's most traded commodity. However, a pestilent fungus and a changing climate are threatening to decimate coffee crops in Latin America.

Understanding the Arctic's 'ice-ocean governor'

Long-term melting of sea ice in the Arctic may lead to the release of huge volumes of cold, fresh water into the North Atlantic, impacting on global climate.

Evidence of earliest life on Earth disputed

Paris - When Australian scientists presented evidence in 2016 of life on Earth 3.7 billon years ago -- pushing the record back 220 million years -- it was a big deal, influencing even the search for life on Mars.

Glitzy 'Science Oscars' to make stars of researchers

Washington - Nine scientists were recognized Wednesday with a "Breakthrough Prize," a $3 million Silicon Valley-funded award meant to confer Oscars-style glamour and prestige on the basic sciences.

New mechanism found for Arctic warming and melting ice

A new atmospheric mechanism by which warm dust travels from the Sahara Desert across the eastern side of the North Atlantic Ocean towards the Arctic, resulting in a warming Arctic and ice melting in southeast Greenland has been found.

A second NASA telescope decides to 'have a little vacation'

Less than a week after the Hubble Space Telescope went offline, the Chandra X-ray Observatory did the same thing, according to NASA on Friday. The space agency notes there appears to be a gyroscope problem with Chandra.

Pentagon's project called 'Insect Allies' - Is it a bioweapon?

A new Pentagon program wants to make insects that spread viruses to food crops to ensure food security, but scientists say the "Insect Allies" program is a biological weapon waiting to happen.

Advancing the participation of young women in tech

Toronto - A movement called #movethedial has been established, with the aim of advancing the participation and leadership of all women in tech. The organization is now accepting applications from youth (ages 14 – 24) with a passion for STEM subjects.

'Real' fake research hoodwinks US journals

Washington - Three US researchers have pulled off a sophisticated hoax by publishing fake research with ridiculous conclusions in sociology journals to expose what they see as ideological bias and a lack of rigorous vetting at these publications.

Study: Protection of astronauts from deep space radiation needed

A new NASA-funded study reveals that exposure to space radiation on long trips, like a voyage to Mars, could permanently harm astronauts' intestines and lead to stomach and colon cancer.

Scientists zero in on cause of unusual Indonesian disaster

Jakarta - Almost a week after a quake-tsunami wreaked devastation in central Indonesia, scientists are zeroing in on what they believe caused the highly unusual natural disaster.The 7.

Female Nobel winner a long time coming, and a drop in the ocean

Paris - When Canadian scientist Donna Strickland got the early morning call informing her she just won the Nobel Physics Prize, she could barely hide her amazement.

Life thrives deep within the Earth — A journey into the Kidd Mine

Toronto - A short drive north of Timmons, Ontario, Canada is the world's oldest copper and zinc mine. The gaping pit is 100 meters (324 feet) across and up to 10,000 feet (3,300 meters) deep. But the mine holds a secret not many people know about.

Liquefaction: When terra firma turns to mush

Jakarta - Survivors of the enormous 7.5-magnitude earthquake and tsunami in Sulawesi, Indonesia that killed 1,234 people have given harrowing testimony of how the ground beneath their feet seemed to churn and suddenly rise up -- swallowing everything in its path.

Indonesia tsunami worsened by shape of Palu bay: scientists

Paris - The tsunami that ravaged the Indonesian city of Palu was outsized compared to the earthquake that spawned it, but other factors -- including a long, narrow bay -- conspired to create monster waves, scientists say.

Hyabusa2 rovers send back stunning images of Ryugu

On September 21, the Japanese space agency JAXA made history by safely landing two tiny rovers on the rugged terrain of an asteroid. The first images were astounding, simply because they proved the little rovers were working, but check out the new images.

Impact from violent bombings in WWII felt to the edge of space

World War II has been relegated to the history books and the massive bombing raids have almost been forgotten. A new study finds that the shockwaves from those bombs not only left deep and obvious scars on the land but were felt at the edge of space.

With genetic tweak, mosquito population made extinct

Paris - Scientists said Monday they had succeeded for the first time in wiping out an entire population of malaria-carrying mosquitos in the lab using a gene editing tool to programme their extinction.

Implant helps paralysed man walk again

Paris - Five years after he was paralysed in a snowmobile accident, a man in the US has learned to walk again aided by an electrical implant, in a potential breakthrough for spinal injury sufferers.

A pair of tiny hopping rovers are about to land on an asteroid

Japan's space agency (JAXA) is preparing to deploy two robotic explorers to the surface of an asteroid. On Friday, the Hayabusa-2 spacecraft will dispatch a pair of "rovers" to the 1kilometer-wide space rock known as Ryugu.

DNA sleuths bolster case against three ivory cartels

Tampa - DNA tests on smuggled elephant tusks have identified three major ivory cartels in Africa and are helping investigators bolster the criminal cases against some of the most dangerous traffickers, researchers said Wednesday.

Even moderate warming could melt Antarctic ice sheet: study

Paris - Moderate global temperature rises of just two degrees Celsius could still be enough to melt parts of the largest ice sheet on Earth and raise sea levels by several metres, experts warned on Wednesday.

Microplastics may enter foodchain through mosquitoes

Paris - Mosquito larvae have been observed ingesting microplastics that can be passed up the food chain, researchers said Wednesday, potentially uncovering a new way that the polluting particles could damage the environment.

New study: Gulf of St. Lawrence shows a dramatic oxygen decline

The Gulf of St. Lawrence has warmed and lost oxygen faster than almost anywhere else in the global oceans due to large-scale climate change, raising the possibility the Gulf could soon be unable to support marine life, according to a new study.

B.C. rainforest has botanical bounty of newly discovered species

Vancouver - Scientists and students from the University of Northern B.C. spent three years conducting a field study of the province's Ancient Forest/Chun T'oh Whudujut Provincial Park, the only inland rainforest in the world. They found over 2,400 plant species.

Egyptian archaeologists discover sphinx in Temple of Kom Ombo

Cairo - Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a statue of a lion's body and a human head in the southern city of Aswan. The sphinx, made of sandstone, was found in the Temple of Kom Ombo during work to protect the site from groundwater.

Workers still search for identity of 9/11 remains, 17 years on

New York - Seventeen years later, more than 1,100 victims of the hijacked plane attacks on the World Trade Center have yet to be identified.But in a New York lab, a team is still avidly working to identify the remains, with technological progress on its side.

The Ocean Cleanup project sails out to sweep Pacific plastic

San Francisco - A supply ship towing a long floating boom designed to corral ocean plastic has set sail from San Francisco for a test run ahead of a trip to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

Scientists hope to clone a 40,000-year-old extinct horse

Scientists are attempting to extract cells from a 40,000-year-old horse in hopes of using the sample to clone the extinct species back into existence. If successful, it would mark an important milestone towards the goal of resurrecting the woolly mammoth.

Warm water under Canada Basin could cause significant ice melt

Newly published research suggests the amount of heat stored in a vast section of the Arctic Ocean has doubled over the last 30 years, adding another blow to the sea ice that helps regulate the planet’s climate.
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Shutterstock
Mount Canlaon or the Kanlaon Volcano.
Mount Canlaon or the Kanlaon Volcano.
Studphil
Herrerasaurus and Eoraptor skeletons  plus a Plateosaurus skull  North American Museum of Ancient Li...
Herrerasaurus and Eoraptor skeletons, plus a Plateosaurus skull, North American Museum of Ancient Life.
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Doctors prefer to avoid any sort of brain surgery but in some cases  such as this one  there is no o...
Doctors prefer to avoid any sort of brain surgery but in some cases, such as this one, there is no other choice.
OpenStax College
CohIT: the healthcare IT industry in Berlin
CohIT: the healthcare IT industry in Berlin
Untitled
March For Science
With new planets being discovered constantly life could show up when we least expect it.
With new planets being discovered constantly life could show up when we least expect it.
Unmismoobjetivo
A picture of a typical lab rat.
A picture of a typical lab rat.
Jean-Etienne Poirrier
Krypton gas is beautiful but also quite dangerous under certain circumstances.
Krypton gas is beautiful but also quite dangerous under certain circumstances.
Jurii
The South Kensington Science Museum actually has an example of a genome sequence on display. As you ...
The South Kensington Science Museum actually has an example of a genome sequence on display. As you can see there is a huge amount of information in the genetic structure of each living being. Some believe this may hold the key to fighting aging.
George Gastin
Ebola particles are quite scary up close  but you should not buy into the fear right away.
Ebola particles are quite scary up close, but you should not buy into the fear right away.
NIAID
File photo: Scientist at work in Dr Sandle s laboratory
File photo: Scientist at work in Dr Sandle's laboratory
Artist s impression of Comet Siding Spring passing before Mars
Artist's impression of Comet Siding Spring passing before Mars
NASA
LHC CMS ECAL Endcaps
LHC CMS ECAL Endcaps
Album copyright © STFC, 24 July 2008 11:15:55
Author  Greg Craven is a high school physics and chemistry teacher at Central High School in Indepen...
Author, Greg Craven is a high school physics and chemistry teacher at Central High School in Independence, Oregon.
Ari Denison, courtesy of Perigee Books, The Penguin Group (2009)
The OH molecule is found in many structures of life and is extremely useful in all forms of chemistr...
The OH molecule is found in many structures of life and is extremely useful in all forms of chemistry.
Pubchem via Wikimedia
Feel free to download and review the data found in this FDA chart. Draw your own conclusions and eng...
Feel free to download and review the data found in this FDA chart. Draw your own conclusions and engage in the debate.
Kirsch I, Deacon B, Huedo-Medina T, Scoboria A, Moore T, Johnson B
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Mouse embryos are commonly used in scientific research. A team of researchers believe they created a process to regress evolution using these.
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xandert
In the anti-laser  incoming light waves are trapped in a cavity where they bounce back and forth unt...
In the anti-laser, incoming light waves are trapped in a cavity where they bounce back and forth until they are eventually absorbed. Their energy is dissipated as heat.
Photo courtesy of Yale / Yidong Chong

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