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Research News

Should an experimental ALS drug be made available?

Biotech company Genervon has requested accelerated approval for its experimental ALS drug after a small but promising Phase 2 clinical trial. Will drug authorities allow its use?

Ghana gets its first emergency medicine training program

In a new initiative seeking to improve healthcare in the country, Ghana has begun its first emergency medicine training program. Nurses are being trained and despatched to regions across the country and new recruits are busily signing up.

We may have overestimated the expansion rate of the universe

New observations of supernovae have suggested that the universe may be expanding much slowly than has been thought up until now. This is a large change that could influence future theories about the end of the universe.

New aluminium battery charges phone in just one minute

Scientists have created a new battery that is capable of fully charging a smartphone in just one minute. Made of aluminium, it could replace today's lithium models in the future and is billed as being much safer too.

Large Hadron Collider begins restart process

The restart of the Large Hadron Collider has begun as particles begin to travel around the 27km tunnel again for the first time since 2013. The LHC has been shut down so that substantial upgrade and maintenance work can be completed.

One man could have deleted every video on YouTube

A security researcher has uncovered a way of deleting every single video from YouTube by sending a simple request to Google servers. The company has now fixed the incredibly serious flaw that could have removed all of the content from its site.

All four major browsers fail Pwn2Own exploit competition

All four major web browsers have failed to survive exploits at the Pwn2Own hacking contest running alongside the CanSecWest 2015 conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. Security researchers were testing them in exchange for cash.

Apple's new iPhone research app poses ethical questions

Apple is launching a new data-sharing platform that can make any iPhone user a medical research participant. However, does this pose ethical issues?

DNA study: Why the Welsh might be the first true Brits

The English aren't English and the real Britons are the Welsh, says a fascinating new study into the DNA of different ethnic groups in Britain.

Snowden documents reveal extent of CIA hacking of Apple security

Documents released by Edward Snowden have shown that the CIA has spent almost a decade trying to break through the security around Apple devices so that they could secretly plant malware onto the devices and monitor users.

Plans to make scientific research more public

Washington D.c. - The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has described the process where the National Institutes of Health and related agencies will make scientific research results public.

Researchers achieve 1Tb/sec 5G speeds in lab

Researchers developing the 5G mobile network technology that will eventually replace 4G have managed to transfer data at a massive 1 Tb/sec in experimental lab conditions, blowing away previous estimates of the potential speed of our future mobiles.

Mein Kampf to be republished by academics in 2016

Seventy years after the author's death, Adolf Hitler's famous but obviously controversial autobiography is to be republished by a collection of academics next year once the copyright on the work expires in a two-volume new addition.

Op-Ed: Viruses are adapting faster than the vaccines

If the next pandemic is inevitable, and if entire categories of cancer are known to originate from infections, should society not be investing more money more urgently into viral research - or are we comfortable relying on vaccinations?

Coffee could lower risk of endometrial cancer

New research has found a link between regularly drinking coffee and a 20% decreased risk of endometrial cancer which currently affects around 1 in 37 US women in their lifetime, adding to the potential health benefits of consuming the popular beverage.

E-cigarettes 'may still harm the lungs and immune system'

New research has suggested that e-cigarette vapour contains toxic chemicals that are damaging to the body, implying they are not a safe alternative to traditional smoking and adding to the continuing debate about the health risks of "vaping."

BMW patches flaw that could have allowed hackers to unlock cars

German car manufacturer BMW has patched a flaw in software used across its product family of cars that would have allowed hackers to unlock the doors of other peoples' cars. Over 2.2 million cars have been affected.

Op-Ed: U.S Republicans make science pledge

Contrary to reports issued by the U.S. Democrats, the Republican Party has declared that it is committed to science, despite the call within its ranks to cut science spending. Not everyone is convinced.

Call for transparency with clinical trial data

The U.S. Institute of Medicine says results from human clinical trials ought to be made available to independent researchers within 18 months. This makes new drugs and their potential side-effects easier to evaluate.

Ebola virus changes over time, may thwart drugs, study says

Miami - The deadly Ebola virus is changing, and new genetic mutations that have arisen in the past four decades could thwart the experimental drugs that some pharmaceutical companies are developing, researchers said Tuesday.

Record-breaking 2014 was hottest in modern history: US

Miami - Record-breaking temperatures scorched the planet last year, making 2014 the hottest in more than a century and raising new concerns about global warming, US government scientists said Friday.

Scientists track how lung cancer spreads

Manchester - Scientists have taken microscopic images revealing that the protein ties tethering cells together are severed in lung cancer cells. The result of this is that the cells can break loose and rapidly spread.

Major U.S. childhood study cancelled

Washington - The U.S. National Institutes of Health has terminated its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood has been cancelled. The project was costing too much money and the data was not meaningful.

Week in review: An Ebola update

A week is a long time in science. With Ebola, the U.S. government admits new patient; joint pains stall a major clinical trial; U.S. grants immunity to vaccine developers; and new doubts are raised about Ebola dying quickly outside the human body.

Typical drug development costs $2.6 billion

How much does it cost to produce a pharmaceutical product these days? According to a new study, the typical cost has rocketed to $2.6 billion. The $ figure is up from an estimated price tag of $1 billion from an analysis published in 2003.

Research shows link between oral health and diabetes

Diabetes is already a threatening disease in itself, but knowing that there are so many risk factors that can cause it makes it all the more frightening.

U.S. halts research on the word's deadliest pathogens

Washington - Following a series of biosafety errors at federal research facilities, the U.S. government has temporarily halted funding for new studies into serious pathogens like influenza, SARS, and MERS viruses.

Facebook admits mistake on emotional manipulation study

Social media giant Facebook admitted that it made a mistake in conducting the study, which in June set off a huge furor for manipulating users' emotions on the social site.

Predicting the next Nobel Prizes

Using citation statistics, the Thomson Reuters is forecasting which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year: the Nobel Prizes.

US warns Ebola could infect 1.4 million by 2015

Washington - The number of Ebola infections in Liberia and Sierra Leone could skyrocket to 1.4 million by January 2015, according to a worst-case scenario released by US health authorities Tuesday.
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Funding for MS Treatment Clinical Trials - April 5  2011 - Winnipeg  Manitoba
Funding for MS Treatment Clinical Trials - April 5, 2011 - Winnipeg, Manitoba
ChrisD.ca
A mouse being used for research/science purposes
A mouse being used for research/science purposes
by diabetesisfun
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A baby baboon safely rests on his mothers back as she forages for food for both of them.
Wikipedia
Tucker trying to pick up the scent of whale scat.
Tucker trying to pick up the scent of whale scat.
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Tucker heads to work
Tucker heads to work
Screen Capture
High winds and floodwaters brought by hurricane Isabel caused extensive flooding to numerous classro...
High winds and floodwaters brought by hurricane Isabel caused extensive flooding to numerous classrooms, dormitories, athletic facilities and main roads throughout the U.S. Naval Academy. Hurricane Isabel, which cost the Navy nearly $130 million in damage in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., made landfall as a category 2 storm near Cape Hatteras, N.C., approximately 100 miles south of Norfolk, Va.
U.S. Navy photo
Simplified version of National Hurricane Center s Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale chart.
Simplified version of National Hurricane Center's Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale chart.
NOAA
A primate undergoing experimentation at Covance in Vienna Virginia who were fined for violations of ...
A primate undergoing experimentation at Covance in Vienna Virginia who were fined for violations of the Animal Welfare Act following a PETA investigation that exposed the horrors and cruelty.
PETA
Mouse embryonic stem cells
Mouse embryonic stem cells
ChongDae-National Science Foundation employee
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Microbes in a testtube
Granger
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Poster from a Canadian science campaign
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Death s Acre - University of Tennesse  Forenic Anthropology Center
Death's Acre - University of Tennesse, Forenic Anthropology Center
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Orca whale
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Feel free to download and review the data found in this FDA chart. Draw your own conclusions and eng...
Feel free to download and review the data found in this FDA chart. Draw your own conclusions and engage in the debate.
Kirsch I, Deacon B, Huedo-Medina T, Scoboria A, Moore T, Johnson B
Entrance to the Medical Center at Duke University  Durham  NC
Entrance to the Medical Center at Duke University, Durham, NC
Bluedog423
Hepatitis C researcher John Law
Hepatitis C researcher John Law
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Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 2005: Situation in South Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana near Empire, Buras and Boothville, United States of America. Photo taken: Aug. 30, 2005.
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Animal rights activists around the world want science to cease experimenting on animals including pr...
Animal rights activists around the world want science to cease experimenting on animals including primates like this one found in laboratories across the country.
PETA
TO the left a case of iritis of the eye. A condition that is a common compliation of Ankylosing Spon...
TO the left a case of iritis of the eye. A condition that is a common compliation of Ankylosing Spondylitis. To the right shows how the spine of an AS patient slowly deforms and spinal fusion takes place.