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Microbiology News

World Tuberculosis Day: How scientists are combating TB

World Tuberculosis Day, observed on 24 March each year, is designed to build public awareness about the global epidemic of tuberculosis. To mark the day, we take a look into some of the latest research aimed at combating the disease.

Essential Science: Genetic test for antimicrobial resistance

Scientists have put together a sensitive method to determine if bacteria carry a gene that can cause resistance to two common antibiotics. The test is rapid, and has been tested against ‘strep throat’ and other respiratory illnesses.

New handheld device to detect drinking water parasites

Scientists have developed a new handheld instrument that can assess microbiological contamination in water, providing the results of the analysis in real-time. The focus is on the parasite Cryptosporidium.

Microbiologists meet to make pharmaceutical manufacturing safer Special

Birmingham - Microbiologist met recently in the U.K. to discuss best practices for monitoring cleanroom environments (the space within which pharmaceutical medicines are produced). The theme of the event was on risk-assessment.

Essential Science: Antimicrobial found in ancient Irish soil

Swansea - A bacterium discovered in ancient Irish soil has been shown to be capable of halting the growth of certain ‘superbugs’. The discovery offers new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance.

Why 2018 was a bad year for food poisoning

Outbreak data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that 2018 was a bad year for food safety outbreaks, one of the worst on record. The CDC investigated 28 outbreaks, much more than the eight outbreaks in 2017.

Bacteria in the nose influence cold severity

Colds vary in their severity and for how long they last for. The reason is not solely down to the type of virus or the relative health of individuals. The bacterial population of the nose is also a factor, according to new research.

Bacteria in the human gut generate electricity

An interesting discovery has been made about several species of bacteria that inhabit the human intestines and which constitute part of the human microbiome. These organisms have been shown to generate electricity.

New cellular target to weaken drug-tolerant bacteria

Canadian microbiologists have located a new cellular target that can weaken the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This organism, which has a multi-drug resistant form, presents a severe threat to patients with cystic fibrosis.

HP accelerating antibiotics by printing medicines

Global technology company HP is to work with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help to speed up the testing of new antibiotics, as part of the race to combat antimicrobial resistance.

Probiotic shows reduction in bone loss in older women

Researchers have used a probiotic to determine whether there is a reduction in the rate of bone related mineral density loss in older women. The results are encouraging, suggesting further study is worthwhile.

How the intestinal microbiome influences metabolism

The body’s intestinal microbiome influences our metabolism, through interacting with the immune system. A new study demonstrates how 'good’ (or beneficial) bacteria keep the body metabolically fit and how an imbalance can cause ill-health effects.

Treating lethal fungal infections by starving fungi

A new study shows how starving fungi could save millions of lives each year. Scientists have discovered a new approach to treating lethal fungal infections, which has the potential to save millions of lives each year.

Microbial metabolite is weapon against skin cancer

New research demonstrates that a microbial metabolite could be a potential and powerful weapon against different forms of skin cancer.

Assessing pharmaceutical quality control in Ireland Special

Dublin - Assessing risks and removing contamination from the processing environment, even in lower classified areas to avoid product contamination, were the key messages at the annual meeting for pharmaceutical microbiologists in Ireland.

Fluorescent silk kills harmful bacteria

A far-red fluorescent silk can kill harmful bacteria, as demonstrated in controlled trials. The developers see the material as both a biomedical and and an environmental remedy to combating harmful organisms and protecting patients.

Diagnostic connectivity to combat antimicrobial resistance

London - The British government has entered into a partnership with FIND, a global non-profit dedicated to accelerating the development of diagnostic tests for diseases. This is to introduce digital technologies to combat the antimicrobial resistance problem.

Chimpanzee beds are cleaner than human ones

New research will surprise those who think they have a high level of personal hygiene. A microbiological study of the sleeping areas of chimpanzees and human beds has found that, socially, the sleeping areas of chimps are cleaner.

Interview: How concerned should consumers be about Salmonella? Special

In the U.S., more than 200 million cartons of eggs have been recalled across nine states over concerns of Salmonella, with contaminated produce linked to at least 22 illnesses. How concerned should consumers be? Dr. Joseph Galati provides some answers.

New class of antibiotics to combat drug resistance

Chicago - A new class of antibiotic has been discovered. The chemical kills bacteria by binding to ribosome. This disrupts protein synthesis, and stops the microbial cell from replicating. This is a step forward in the search for new antimicrobials.

Essential Science: Is our microbiome based on genetics?

The nature vs. nurture debate is one of the most hotly debated areas of science, in terms of predicting physiological outcomes. This issue has been reignited in terms of the human microbiome in a new study from Israel.

Algorithm helps fight infection spread

Many global health authorities are fighting against the spread of infectious diseases thanks to computer software. A new algorithm has been devised to address the issue of non-diagnosed diseases.

Old antibiotic compounds could become the next life-saving drugs

Leeds - The battle between humans and antimicrobial resistant bacteria continues to be one of the major problems affecting society. A new initiative from University of Leeds scientists aims to review previously discarded medicinal products.

Artificial intelligence used to identify bacteria

Microbial identification has been streamlined in recent years through rapid methods and computer reading. However, a skilled microbiologist is often required. Can AI replace the need for the microbiologist?

New technologies and risk assessments needed for medicinal safety Special

Oxford - The need to invest in new technologies and a call for a new paradigm for approaching risk assessment were the keynote messages from the 2017 Pharmig conference, which focused on making medicines safe for patients.

Rapid methods needed to help safety of medicines Special

Oxford - Pharmaceutical organizations need to embrace rapid methods in order to protect patients, obtain faster results, and help to address inventory issues. This was a key message delivered at the annual Pharmig conference.

Interview: The path to next-generation antibiotics Special

Dr. Marcos Pires is spearheading a novel approach to understanding bacterial cell wall changes in response to antibiotics that could be key to new drug design. We spoke with him to discover more about this approach.

New battery is activated by spit

New York - Engineers and microbiologists have invented a new type of battery based on a microbial fuel cells. The battery can be activated by spit and it is intended to be used in extreme conditions.

New technology for food contamination screening

Bonn - Contaminated food is a major health risk to the consumer and it is also bad for business. If undesirable substances are ingested this can lead to significant health consequences, and many risks arise from the environment.

Essential Science: Big investments for human microbiome research

Moving from a field of academic research to commercialization, interest in the human microbiome has been accelerating over the past year with several big biotechnology companies involved. We take a look at the reasons why.
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Microbial technology for assessing the sterility of medicinal products on show.
Microbial technology for assessing the sterility of medicinal products on show.
Selection of microbiological culture media. Collecting samples can help to provide a basis for under...
Selection of microbiological culture media. Collecting samples can help to provide a basis for understanding risk.
Laboratoty technician microbiological analysis
Laboratoty technician microbiological analysis
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Global audit specialist Julie Roberts discusses best practices for microbiological identification at...
Global audit specialist Julie Roberts discusses best practices for microbiological identification at the conference.
Agar plates for culturing bacteria (Tim Sandle s laboratory  UK)
Agar plates for culturing bacteria (Tim Sandle's laboratory, UK)
The lecture hall at the 2014 Pharmig microbiology conference (Nottingham  U.K.)
The lecture hall at the 2014 Pharmig microbiology conference (Nottingham, U.K.)
A microbiologist undertakes molecular testing into an unknown bacterium. Photograph taken in Tim San...
A microbiologist undertakes molecular testing into an unknown bacterium. Photograph taken in Tim Sandle's laboratory.
The logo screen  welcoming delegates to the Pharmig microbiology conference.
The logo screen, welcoming delegates to the Pharmig microbiology conference.
Microbiologists discussing the latest technologies for contamination control at the exhibition part ...
Microbiologists discussing the latest technologies for contamination control at the exhibition part of Pharmig's Irish conference.
Exhibitors examining microbiological methods at the Pharmig conference.
Exhibitors examining microbiological methods at the Pharmig conference.
Pharmig stand at the conference  putting forward new ideas for pharmaceutical microbiology.
Pharmig stand at the conference, putting forward new ideas for pharmaceutical microbiology.
A technician viewing agar plates on a colony counter  Tim Sandle s laboratory.
A technician viewing agar plates on a colony counter, Tim Sandle's laboratory.
Microbiological culture media
Microbiological culture media

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