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Microbiology News

Microbiologists become more 'cultured' after annual conference Special

Nottingham - The importance of a contamination control strategy and a science-based approach to addressing microbial issues are the key elements for any pharmaceutical microbiologist’s toolbox. These were the main lessons from the Pharmig annual conference.

Microbiologists 'colonize' Nottingham to discuss hot topics Special

Nottingham - Each November pharmaceutical microbiologists converge for the annual Pharmig conference to discuss medicinal safety and the latest developments in all-things microbiology. On day one of year's event pharmaceutical regulators outlined their expectations.

Novel process allows microbes to harvest electrons

In a new, and very novel, process researchers have shown how a species of bacteria can be used to 'eat' electricity. This involves pulling in electrons away from an electrode source.

Is it time for a ‘shocking’ new way to kill microbes?

A new electrochemical approach is being developed to treat infections of metal-based implants, according to a new research study. The technology appears to be able to kill bacteria and fungi and reduce infection risk.

Hospital clean-up actually increased microbial contamination

Edinburgh - A new study into the clean-up of a hospital in response to bacterial contamination reveals that the remediation process actually made matters worse, dislodging more contamination than there actually was to start with.

Mucus helps inactivate bacterial biofilms

Boston - New research into mucus shows that it plays an essential role in controlling bacterial biofilms and helping to prevent infection. This is due to sugar molecules present, termed glycans and these disarm opportunistic pathogens.

Q&A: Solving the tuberculosis crisis using technology Special

LLamasoft, a supply chain design software designer, and a FIND non-profit healthcare organization, have recently partnered to use AI technology to find millions of undiagnosed patients impacted by tuberculosis.

Half of all commonly used drugs change the gut microbiome

New research, presented at UEG Week 2019 (19-23 October), has linked half of all commonly used drugs to profound changes in the gut microbiome. This has implications for human health and wellbeing.

Q&A: Dell EMC powers AI to understand disease outbreaks Special

Simon Fraser University are using Dell technology to study the DNA code in infectious disease microbes and using that to understand how the diseases are spreading and how to better track them, deploying machine learning and deep learning algorithms.

Application of blue light to eliminate bacterial biofilms

An emerging, novel approach to control antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections is based on the use of light, in particular of blue wavelengths (400–470 nm). A new research paper of interest, concerning biofilm elimination by inducing oxidative stres

Dolphins are showing cases of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance and the consequential enhanced risk to from pathogenic organisms is not only something that affects humans; other animals, such as dolphins, are equally impacted, according to new research.

Rates of antimicrobial resistance rising drastically in animals

New research shows that antimicrobial-resistant infections are increasing in animals across low and middle income countries at a rate far faster that earlier predictions suggested.

Mystery of unique probiotic yeast solved with CRISPR

Microbiologists have found discovered that the yeast Saccharomyces boulardii produces high amounts of acetic acid. By locating the genetic basis for this, the researchers could cancel the acetic acid production to find its probiotic effect.

Microbiology News: Antimicrobials and mother's microbiome

From a rise of superbugs in Southeast Asia, the earliest recorded evidence of tapeworm, and the microbial community of the mother influencing that of her child, represent three of the biggest microbiology news items this month. We delve deeper.

Fecal transplant deaths: Call for improved regulations

Following the death of one patient and another falling seriously ill, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has called for greater controls over fecal transplants. The patients became infected with a multi-drug resistant bacterial infection.

Pollution concern: China’s algal blooms are getting bigger

They may appear visually stunning, especially from satellite images. However, new research traces how toxic bioluminescent microorganisms are becoming increasingly abundant, indicating a growing concern with pollution in China's waters.

New microorganism helps produce alternative fuels

Researchers have used genetically engineered algae that can grow three times faster than starch crops and used this to produce biofuel and biochemicals.

Advancing the design of pharma water systems for medicinal safety Special

Dublin - Water may seem like a routine part of the production of medicines but water contaminated with microorganisms is a cause of drug product recalls and can lead to patient harm. The importance of water quality was the theme of a recent conference.

From nudge theory to sound science, microbiologists in Ireland Special

Dublin - From nudge theory, to the importance of looking at the science behind processes and procedures, the Pharmig microbiology conference in Ireland featured some of the hottest topics in the industry.

Essential Science: Breakthrough for patients with pneumonia

New research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, presents the first clinical results with CAL02 in patients suffering from severe pneumonia, the first cause of infectious mortality in the world.

Careless disposal of medicines increases antimicrobial resistance

Copenaghen - There are a number of ways by which antimicrobial resistance can spread, and one that is of growing concern is the disposal of medicines by consumers down sinks and toilets. A new technique can help to assess the extent of the spread.

Q&A: Creating ‘smart’ microbial bionsensors Special

New research shows that protein-based biosensors can detect the presence of a desired enzyme target and respond by physically lighting up, and enabling researchers to immediately identify cells with increased overall enzyme yield.

Microbiologists bring best practices to the Adriatic region Special

Sterile pharmaceutical products need to be manufactured to the highest possible standards and the technology, processes and regulatory expectations continue to shift. Understanding these changes was theme of a two-day event in the Adriatic region.

World Tuberculosis Day: How scientists are combating TB

World Tuberculosis Day, observed on 24 March each year, is designed to build public awareness about the global epidemic of tuberculosis. To mark the day, we take a look into some of the latest research aimed at combating the disease.

Essential Science: Genetic test for antimicrobial resistance

Scientists have put together a sensitive method to determine if bacteria carry a gene that can cause resistance to two common antibiotics. The test is rapid, and has been tested against ‘strep throat’ and other respiratory illnesses.

New handheld device to detect drinking water parasites

Scientists have developed a new handheld instrument that can assess microbiological contamination in water, providing the results of the analysis in real-time. The focus is on the parasite Cryptosporidium.

Microbiologists meet to make pharmaceutical manufacturing safer Special

Birmingham - Microbiologist met recently in the U.K. to discuss best practices for monitoring cleanroom environments (the space within which pharmaceutical medicines are produced). The theme of the event was on risk-assessment.

Essential Science: Antimicrobial found in ancient Irish soil

Swansea - A bacterium discovered in ancient Irish soil has been shown to be capable of halting the growth of certain ‘superbugs’. The discovery offers new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance.

Why 2018 was a bad year for food poisoning

Outbreak data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that 2018 was a bad year for food safety outbreaks, one of the worst on record. The CDC investigated 28 outbreaks, much more than the eight outbreaks in 2017.

Bacteria in the nose influence cold severity

Colds vary in their severity and for how long they last for. The reason is not solely down to the type of virus or the relative health of individuals. The bacterial population of the nose is also a factor, according to new research.
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Selection of microbiological culture media. Collecting samples can help to provide a basis for under...
Selection of microbiological culture media. Collecting samples can help to provide a basis for understanding risk.
Microbiological culture media  a colorful array for growing microbes  on show at the Pharmig 2019 co...
Microbiological culture media, a colorful array for growing microbes, on show at the Pharmig 2019 conference.
A microbiologist undertakes molecular testing into an unknown bacterium. Photograph taken in Tim San...
A microbiologist undertakes molecular testing into an unknown bacterium. Photograph taken in Tim Sandle's laboratory.
Pharmig stand at the conference  putting forward new ideas for pharmaceutical microbiology.
Pharmig stand at the conference, putting forward new ideas for pharmaceutical microbiology.
Microbiological culture media
Microbiological culture media
The logo screen  welcoming delegates to the Pharmig microbiology conference.
The logo screen, welcoming delegates to the Pharmig microbiology conference.
Laboratoty technician microbiological analysis
Laboratoty technician microbiological analysis
The lecture hall at the 2014 Pharmig microbiology conference (Nottingham  U.K.)
The lecture hall at the 2014 Pharmig microbiology conference (Nottingham, U.K.)
Exhibitors examining microbiological methods at the Pharmig conference.
Exhibitors examining microbiological methods at the Pharmig conference.
A technician viewing agar plates on a colony counter  Tim Sandle s laboratory.
A technician viewing agar plates on a colony counter, Tim Sandle's laboratory.
Microbial technology for assessing the sterility of medicinal products on show.
Microbial technology for assessing the sterility of medicinal products on show.
Global audit specialist Julie Roberts discusses best practices for microbiological identification at...
Global audit specialist Julie Roberts discusses best practices for microbiological identification at the conference.
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Microbiologists discussing the latest technologies for contamination control at the exhibition part ...
Microbiologists discussing the latest technologies for contamination control at the exhibition part of Pharmig's Irish conference.
Agar plates for culturing bacteria (Tim Sandle s laboratory  UK)
Agar plates for culturing bacteria (Tim Sandle's laboratory, UK)

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