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Medicine News

HIV antibody therapy shows success

A new study has revealed that delivering antibodies to HIV-infected people can lower levels of the virus. This offers hope as a new treatment for those infected with the virus.

Ghana gets its first emergency medicine training program

In a new initiative seeking to improve healthcare in the country, Ghana has begun its first emergency medicine training program. Nurses are being trained and despatched to regions across the country and new recruits are busily signing up.

Obama's personalized medicine plan advances

Washington D.c. - The U.S. National Institutes of Health has assembled a team of medicine and science experts to begin the process of building President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative.

Medicine for psychological illness found at co-pilot's home: Report

Berlin - German police have found medical treatments for psychological illness at the home of the co-pilot suspected of deliberately crashing a jet into the French Alps, killing 149 people and himself, a German newspaper said Saturday.

Let there be Light Special

For 1.5 million people worldwide, the coming of sunset means darkness or the flickering light from cheap kerosene lamps and candles. This ‘light poverty’ has far reaching consequences, in terms of health and economics.

Anti-HIV drug falters

Scientists have reported that compounds that they hoped would "wake up" dormant reservoirs of HIV inside immune system T cells, allowing them to be destroyed by targeted medications, have not been successful.

Antibiotics resistance could kill 10 million a year by 2050

London - A British government-commissioned review has found that resistance to antibiotics could account for 10 million deaths a year and hit global gross domestic product by 2.0 to 3.5 percent by 2050.

Digital Journal's top science stories of 2014 Special

2014 has seen a myriad of fascinating science news. Digital Journal looks back at the year in science and selects the 12 most interesting stories that have impacted people's lives around the world.

Nanorobots designed to swim through human blood

Bonn - Nanorobots could be designed to carry out medical tasks in the human body. Researchers have created “swimming bodies” that can navigate through biological fluids like blood.

Graphene helps with personalized medicine

Control over DNA is one of the steps toward personalized medicines. One means to achieve this is through graphene, where a positive charge applied to a graphene nanopore can accelerate DNA movement and a negative charge can stops DNA in its tracks.

Laboratory-grown penises ready for testing in humans

Raleigh - U.S. medical researchers have successfully grown new penises in the laboratory from cultured human cells. They may soon be able to implant them safely on to human patients who are missing the vital organ.

Op-Ed: Obamacare not doing enough to help with health care costs

As the Affordable Care Act comes closer to full implementation across the United States, it is clear that this legislation does not do enough to ensure that citizens can afford health care. Obamacare is insufficient for our needs.

Trio win Nobel medicine prize for brain's 'GPS'

Stockholm - British-American researcher John O'Keefe on Monday won the Nobel Medicine Prize with a Norwegian couple, May-Britt and Edvard Moser, for discovering an "inner GPS" that helps the brain navigate.

FDA approves new device for treating migraines

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given the go-ahead for two new devices to be marketed for the treatment of migraines. The devices offer a different option to established treatments.

Thermometer can potentially detect lung cancer

Munich - Today, the only way doctors can definitively diagnose patients for lung cancer is by an invasive and uncomfortable biopsy.

Researchers discover key antibiotic power of honey bee bacteria

Lund - A budding discovery courtesy of research teams at Lund University in Sweeden may open the door to defeating deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

U.K. announces restrictions on cancer medicines

London - The U.K. government has announced that is extending the annual spend on its Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) from the current £200 million a year to £280 million a year. This is to accommodate for the rise of cancer drug costs.

Violinist plays right through brain surgery

Rochester - Doctors like to keep patients engaged and alert during brain surgery, but having them play a violin? — Now that's something unusual.

Dr. Noah Minskoff says medicine needs a tech revolution Commissioned

The U.S. medical industry is in need of more technological innovation to improve overall health and reduce the costs of patient care, according to Dr. Noah Minskoff, a leading medical professional.

Experimental Ebola drug shows promise, but more help is needed

The current Ebola outbreak in west Africa is the deadliest in history, but a possible silver lining of the infection of Americans assisting in the region is that the U.S. medical research sector will now focus intensely on the infamous virus.

Op-Ed: Ebola patients returning to U.S. should spark pandemic planning

Though there is virtually no chance of infection from the two American Ebola patients returning to the U.S., it does raise questions as to how prepared our nation is for a deadly viral pandemic.

Cholesterol management drug niacin 'carries risks'

New studies show that cholesterol management drug niacin produces more side effects than previously known. On that basis, some doctors now caution against taking it.

Smartphone used to spot fake medicines

Developers from Egypt have devised a smartphone app that is able to distinguish between genuine drug treatment and counterfeits.

Sterile products produced by Downing Labs recalled

Washington - U.S. FDA is alerting consumers not to use drugs marketed as sterile produced by Downing Labs LLC, also known as NuVision Pharmacy, in Dallas. This is because products may be contaminated.

How a variety of foods help medics to train

Cafe au lait, port wine and anchovy sauce are among a strange mix of foods that help doctors diagnose disease. Descriptions of different foods run through any medical textbooks, helping trainee doctors to spot medical signs and symptoms.

What is being done about antibiotic resistance? Special

London Colney - Humans face the very real risk of a future without antibiotics. The implications of this are that life expectancy could fall due to people dying from diseases that are readily treatable today. This is the warning issued in a new paper by Tim Sandle.

New York expected to become next medical marijuana state

New York - New York could legalize medical marijuana as soon as this week after a proposal to that effect passed the state legislature on Friday.

Light ahead in fight against degenerative blindness

Paris - Once doomed to a life of darkness, dozens of people stricken by retinal diseases are rediscovering a world of light as scientists push ahead on cures for blindness.

Video: Dr. Oz called into Senate review

Dr. Oz has for some time been making claims about how miraculous his products are. Now senators are calling him in for a review of how much his products do and how much is just marketing.

Stem cell spinal cord research resumes

Three years have passed since the medical research organization Geron closed its stem cell program. Now news is in that the group BioTime have received funding to relaunch a Phase 1 trial for spinal cord injury.
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 Ebola virus particles  by Thomas W. Geisbert  Boston University School of Medicine - PLoS Pathogens...
"Ebola virus particles" by Thomas W. Geisbert, Boston University School of Medicine - PLoS Pathogens, November 2008 direct link to the image description page doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000225. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ebola_virus_particles.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Ebola_virus_particles.jpg
Thomas W. Geisbert, Boston University School of Medicine - PLoS Pathogens, November 2008 direct link
CohIT: The healthcare IT industry in Berlin
CohIT: The healthcare IT industry in Berlin
Medicine  pills  tablets  pharmaceuticals  drugs
Medicine, pills, tablets, pharmaceuticals, drugs
Untitled
Grumpy-Puddin
Discarded medicine
Discarded medicine
Medical marijuana
Medical marijuana
Via Flickr user Mark
Fish oil supplements
Fish oil supplements
Via flickr user rjp
Dr. Christina Lee of the School of English at University of Nottingham.
Dr. Christina Lee of the School of English at University of Nottingham.
University of Nottingham
A bunch of pills
A bunch of pills
e-Magine.Art.com
Pills
Prescription pills
Flillmore Photography
Antibiotics like these may soon become lose their potency as pathogens adapt.
Antibiotics like these may soon become lose their potency as pathogens adapt.
Tom Varco
Homeopathy watching horrors of Allopathy
Homeopathy watching horrors of Allopathy
Alexander Beydeman (1826—1869)
Cough syrup
Cough syrup
Hansa D. Bhargava
A handful of multivitamins
A handful of multivitamins
YuMaNuMa
A sphygmomanometer  a device used for measuring arterial pressure.
A sphygmomanometer, a device used for measuring arterial pressure.
Blutdruck
Accudial medicines
Accudial medicines
CohIT: the healthcare IT industry in Berlin
CohIT: the healthcare IT industry in Berlin
Smallpox was once a world-wracking disease that destroyed lives. Dengue Fever is one right now but c...
Smallpox was once a world-wracking disease that destroyed lives. Dengue Fever is one right now but could some go the same way as its cousin due to a new vaccine study.
James Gathany via CDC
Accudial medicines
Accudial medicines
Various vitamins in a bowl
Various vitamins in a bowl
bradley j