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Medical News

Signal-sending smart bandage in development

Swansea - A 'smart' bandage that can detect how a wound is healing and send electronic messages back to doctors is in development. The bandage could be in hospitals within a year.

Playing Tetris can help the recovery of trauma victims

Oxford - Can playing Tetris ease the minds after a traumatic event? New research suggests this is the case provided that the game is played within six hours of a traumatic incident happening.

Solar-powered skin developed for prosthetic limbs

Glasgow - Prosthetic limbs and bionics continue to advance, restoring mobility to patients who have suffered injuries. One new innovation is powering artificial limbs with energy derived from solar power.

Blood test can forecast heart attacks

Boston - A new blood test has the potential to predict some types of heart attack. It has been developed at by Prevencio Inc. and evaluated at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Wireless patch shows success in treating migraines

As an alternative to taking potent medication to combat the severe pain associated with migraines, researchers have developed a wearable device that uses stimulation to help alleviate the condition.

New chemical neutralizes snake venom rapidly

A new, low cost and effective anti-venom chemical has been developed. The chemical has been formulated to tackle snake bites and to rapidly neutralize the venom. The application will prove useful to remote areas.

Is it time for a global vaccine compensation scheme?

With a new vaccine for Zika virus in development and a rise with the administration of vaccine in general, is it time to consider a global vaccine compensation scheme? This is in the event of an adverse response.

Pancreas 'regenerated' through fasting diet

A new U.S. study has found that a major organ - the pancreas - can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet. This could be of potential benefit to those with diabetes.

First use of graphene to find cancer cells

Much has been written about graphene and its flexible structure and highly conductive properties. Most early applications have been with electronics. Now attention turns to medical use.

Precious metal zeros in on cancer

A newly developed organo-metal compound has been shown to successfully infiltrate cancer cells and zeroing in on the cellular mitochondria, which causes the destruction of cancer cells.

Essential Science: Gut microbes cause your blood pressure to rise

Unhealthy gut microorganisms can trigger a rise in blood pressure and this can trigger the unhealthy effects of hypertension, according to new research. The research further reinforces the role the balance of human microorganisms play in disease.

Medical technologists find cheaper way to make essential medicine

Durham - Medical technologists have found a means to create an anti-fungal medication, designed to combat Cryptococcal meningitis, less expensively. The drug is intended for use in parts of Africa.

Medical technologists investigate irregular heartbeats

Investigative medical technology could change the way doctors treat an irregular heartbeat condition called atrial fibrillation.

Does eating peppers help raise life expectancy?

Does the consumption of red chilli peppers impart any health benefits? According to one study, the consumption of chili peppers leads to a 13 percent reduction in mortality. This of course depends on various lifestyle factors.

New sensor detects inflammatory bowel disease

Nashville - The world’s first sensor, able to assess inflammatory bowel disease, has been developed. The sensor will help medics to take a more personalized approach to treating the disease.

Essential Science: Heartburn drugs may raise stroke risk

Copenaghen - A recent concern has been raised about heartburn drugs and a connection to an increased risk of stroke. This follows earlier studies linking this type of medication to dementia, kidney and heart problems. Digital Journal looks into the issue.

Surgical forceps removed from man after 18 years

Medics in Vietnam have extracted surgical forceps from a man. The forceps had been inside the man’s body for 18 years; the man had not known he was carrying the medical equipment.

Fingertip sensors developed for breast cancer exams

For women, regular check-ups for unusual lumps in their breasts is important and it has saved countless lives. To make this process more accurate, scientists have developed special gloves with built-in sensors.

Adding barcodes to breast implants for safety

London - In an attempt to protect the health of women, the U.K. is to start having all breast implants barcoded. This is to stop previous problems with implants made from dangerous materials finding their way into medical centers.

Essential Science: Nanoparticles fight resistant breast cancer

Scientists have developed nanoparticles to accurately target and treat a form of breast cancer that is resistant to conventional therapeutics.

Ultraviolet light can control inflammation

With a potential medical breakthrough scientists have come up with d a chemical tool to control inflammation, one that is activated by ultraviolet light.

Medics use sonic waves for deep brain surgery

London - British medial researchers have successfully used sonic waves to operate deep inside the brain of a patient. The novel treatment was used with a person who suffered from uncontrollable tremors in their hands.

British doctors request three-person baby study

Newcastle - British doctors have made a formal request to the national fertility regulator to undertake mitochondrial replacement therapy. This involves creating a baby with DNA from three people.

Diabetes monitoring breathalyzer developed

A new hand-held breathalyzer that allows individuals to easily assess their blood glucose levels has been developed. The device informs the user bout diabetes risk and it differs from a medical device we reported on earlier this month.

Blood flow patterns provide stroke predictions

The shape and flow of blood through the heart can acts as model to predict the likelihood of a person developing a stroke, according to a new medical study.

New survey examines spread of hospital pathogens

The rooms in which patients are in, be they wards, waiting rooms, or operating theaters, are a source of pathogens, according to a new study. The findings could have implications for patient management.

New medical device technology set to benefit patients

As regular readers of Digital Journal will be aware, health technology and digital health have introduced a range of important innovations. Many of these involve ‘connected technology.’ We survey five new innovations.

Hospital quarantined after unexplained hallucinations

A hospital department in a hospital in Oregon has been quarantined after five people experienced unexplained and mysterious hallucinations.

Why are kidney stones passed on multiple roller coaster rides?

Taking several rides on a roller coaster can help to pass kidney stones. Researchers amusingly established this by taking multiple rides. Back in the lab, they've found out why.

Bacteria in the blood could trigger dozens of diseases

Are bacteria in the human blood system responsible for indirectly triggering a range of diseases? New research suggests a link to strokes and heart attacks, and other ill-health conditions.
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Medical Image

A woman receives medical attention after part of the ceiling at the Apollo Theatre on Shaftesbury Av...
A woman receives medical attention after part of the ceiling at the Apollo Theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue collapsed in central London December 19, 2013.
With permission by Reuters/Neil Hall
Medical Pavilion at Treasure Coast Square in Jensen Beach  Florida
Medical Pavilion at Treasure Coast Square in Jensen Beach, Florida
Creative Commons image by SurfaceWarriors
Creative Commons image by SurfaceWarriors
Creative Commons image by SurfaceWarriors
HOMEGROWN: Oregon decriminalization advocate Paul Stanford stands in the marijuana garden maintained...
HOMEGROWN: Oregon decriminalization advocate Paul Stanford stands in the marijuana garden maintained by his organization, The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation, in Portland in 2013.
Paul Stanford/Wikimedia Commons
medical technologist operates equipment in a hospital
medical technologist operates equipment in a hospital
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Coming soon....
A doctor examining a patient
A doctor examining a patient
Wikicommons
medical chart
medical chart
Indrani Soemardjan
Photograph of Hannah Warren  taken by her parents for media outlets
Photograph of Hannah Warren, taken by her parents for media outlets
Genevieve Warren