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Genetics News

Artificial neurons to study the genetic basis of mental illness

To design new drugs to tackle psychiatric disorders requires an understanding of the biological and genetic causes of certain types of mental illnesses. To assist with this task, research have grown brain neurons.

Genetic ancestry databases can be used to solve crimes

A research group have developed a computational model that links family members by using genealogical and law-enforcement databases. Through this it is possible to use the data to solve some crimes.

German MPs voice concern about prenatal genetic tests

Berlin - More than 100 German lawmakers voiced concern on Friday about prenatal tests for genetic disorders such as Down Syndrome that they say lead to more abortions.

Abused children carry the trauma in their cells: study

Paris - Children subjected to abuse may carry the physical hallmark of that trauma in their cells, scientists said Tuesday, in research that could help criminal investigations probing historic mistreatment.

DNA tests bring together French son of GI and US half-brother

Colleville-sur-mer - A Frenchman who spent his whole adult life searching for his American father, a soldier who fought in Europe during World War Two, said he was "bowled over" after coming face-to-face with a previously unknown half-brother on Monday thanks to a chance D...

Individual genetic profiles reveal disease predictions

The risk of developing a genetic disease is connected with small changes in many different genes. New analysis reveals how tiny genetic changes can predict which people are most at risk.

EU court extends GMO rules to new techniques

Luxembourg - Plants and animals created by new techniques of genetic modification should be treated as Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) and follow European rules aimed at preventing damage to the environment and health, the EU's top court said on Wednesday.

Q&A: Blockchain-based platform for largest genomic data hub Special

Munich - Shivom, the blockchain-based platform creating the world’s largest genomic data hub, has announced its partnership with SingularityNet, the blockchain-based platform and marketplace for artificial intelligence. Dr. Axel Schumacher explains more.

Who has access to your DNA data?

San Fransisco - Since 1983, for each baby born in the state of California, a sample of DNA has been taken by the government. Finding out where this biological sample is stored and who can have access to it is proving challenging.

Op-Ed: Think first before giving away your DNA

DNA sequencing has become cheap and accessible, resulting in biotech companies generating large databases of genetic material. It is time to think about what happens to your data.

British geneticist Sulston dies age 75: institute

London - Nobel prize-winning British scientist John Sulston, a leading figure in the race to decipher the human genome, has died at the age of 75, the institute he founded said Friday.

Vampire bat's blood-only diet 'a big evolutionary win'

Paris - At first glance, the cost-benefit ratio of a blood-only diet suggests that vampire bats -- the only mammals to feed exclusively on the viscous, ruby-red elixir -- flew down an evolutionary blind alley.

Microsoft to use artificial intelligence to improve CRISPR

There is considerably scientific interest in CRISPR, the gene editing technology, especially in the potential to address genetic diseases. To speed up development, Microsoft plans to harness artificial intelligence.

Essential Science: Sequencing Rudolph’s Genome

A seasonal science column this week: Chinese scientists have successfully sequenced and analyzed the genome of Rangifer tarandus (reindeer), which is the only domesticated species in the deer family Cervidae.

Genetic tool that can doom a species under UN review

Paris - For some, a new cutting-edge technology called gene drive is the silver bullet able to wipe out invasive species decimating island wildlife, and eradicate the malaria-bearing mosquitos that killed nearly half a million people last year, mostly in Afric...

Gene therapy saves boy's skin, life: study

Paris - A boy who nearly died when disease stripped most of the skin from his body, is playing soccer two years after he received a new, gene-edited hide in an experimental procedure, the doctors who treated him said Wednesday.

Is reversible gene editing possible?

Researchers have proposed altering gene-editing technology with the view of combating diseases without having to trigger permanent changes to the DNA of people. Current gene editing is based on permanently altering DNA.

Catch a whiff of this: scientists decode durian DNA

Paris - Once described by a detractor as smelling of "turpentine and onions, garnished with a gym sock", southeast Asia's durian fruit leaves no-one unmoved -- you either adore or abhor it.

Gene-editing technology repairs mutation for muscular dystrophy

A new way to deliver gene-editing technology inside has repaired the mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is a severe muscle-wasting disease, in mice. The delivery system is CRISPR-Gold.

FarmTech: Biotechnology for breeding healthier animals

Edinburgh - By analyzing the genetic code of sheep, researchers have come up with information that will aid breeding programs leading to healthier and more productivity animals. This centers on a review of genes relating to different tissues and organs.

Essential Science: First genome-wide cancer map produced

An interesting new map shows over 760 genetic dependencies across multiple cancers. The map suggests new opportunities for developing innovative cancer treatments for scientists and start-up biotech.

Can artificial intelligence aid human age-reversal?

Combating the human aging process, either for health reasons or reasons more attuned to simply living for longer, has occupied considerable amounts of scientific inquiry. The solution to combating cell aging may lie with artificial intelligence.

Scientists gene-edit piglets, bringing transplants to humans closer

Washington - Scientists have successfully edited the genetic code of piglets to remove dormant viral infections, a breakthrough that could eventually pave the way for animal-to-human organ transplants.

New gene study rewrites Neanderthal history

Miami - A new way to use DNA to peer into the history of humanity is rewriting what experts know about our long-extinct cousins, the Neanderthals, US researchers said Monday.

The first ever flower on Earth has been reconstructed

Everyone loves flowers, and the human race has propagated that love over centuries, creating vast numbers of color variations. However, until recently, no one knew what the very first flower on Earth looked like.

Essential Science: First U.S. case of human embryo gene editing

U.S. researchers based in Oregon have performed of gene editing on human embryos. The researchers corrected defective genes responsible for inherited diseases in several embryos using the gene editing technology CRISPR.

Gene-editing technology cures a genetic blood disorder

A next-generation gene-editing system has cured a genetic blood disorder in living mice using intravenous infusion treatment.

New open software allows diagnosis of genetic diseases

Genetic diseases are difficult to diagnose and the accuracy (or otherwise) of the diagnosis impact upon patient health. To help with this a new open-source software tool called Mendel, MD has been launched.

Link between higher childhood IQ and longer-life

Edinburgh - In a study that is likely to stir opinion and initiate debate, a higher IQ during childhood has been linked with the expectation of a longer-life. This is based on a study published in the British Medical Journal.

Essential Science: How pythons regenerate their organs

Pythons are remarkable in many ways and this includes the ability to regenerate their organs. Unlocking the genetic secret of this could aid medics who seek to improve the way people, recover from injuries.
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Genetics Image

Tulip poplar  or yellow poplar  (Liriodendron tulipifera)  closeup looking into flower on leafy bran...
Tulip poplar, or yellow poplar, (Liriodendron tulipifera), closeup looking into flower on leafy branch.
Dcrjsr
DNA double helix
DNA double helix
Peter Alfred Hess
Untitled
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
CRISPR -  revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA.
CRISPR - revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA.
UC Berkeley
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 ...
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 million years ago.
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
Untitled
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
Professor David Sinclair  an Australian scientist and entrepreneur
Professor David Sinclair, an Australian scientist and entrepreneur
Harvard College
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 ...
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 million years ago. To find out what this flower may looked like, the study used the evolutionary tree (here simplified) that connects all living species of flowering plants
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
Untitled
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
Untitled
Warner Bros
Representative image of the region of the brain affected by Huntington Disease.
Representative image of the region of the brain affected by Huntington Disease.
Susann Schweiger