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Genetics News

Cats adopted humans, according to new study

Leuven - New research looking at the genomes of cats has come up with something interesting: the domestic cats of today are genetically equivalent to ancient cats. Cats did not genetically adapt to become domesticated, they chose to.

Genetics reveals some of the secrets for long life expectancy

Crete - Researchers have been keenly studying the populace of isolated Greek village, called Mylopotamos, in order to understand the ‘genetic secrets’ that appear to confer protection against heart disease.

Mutant bacteria biofilms could be big problem for space travelers

Bacteria evolving into giant blobs that engulf unwary space travelers is only seen in Sci-Fi movies, but mutant bacterial biofilms are real, and a first ever study shows they could present a problem to space travelers.

Want differently colored corn? You’ve got it

Consumers, it seems, want the best of both worlds. There is a desire for new ‘fresh’ looking food and there is a desire for only natural ingredients to be used. This stretches to food dyes as well. Researchers have developed natural dyes for corn.

Funding shortage for synthesized human genome plan

The next-big thing in the world of biological science is an attempt to synthesize the human genome, or what’s being called the ‘Genome Project-write.’ This momentous challenge remains unfunded and it has raised some controversies.

New insight into the family tree of canines

Washington - A new insight into the family tree of dogs reveals a previously unknown dimension to the history of canines. This has come about through the largest family tree of dogs ever assembled.

At you best morning, afternoon or evening? It's genetics

Are you sharpest in the morning or do you prefer staying up to the late hours? What makes us different might be down to genetics rather than personality, according to a new study.

Science reveals how some chickens got striped feathers

Stockholm - Behind the rage of plumage color and patterning on the feathers of birds is genetics. The precise mechanisms have proved elusive to researchers, until now. Two independent gene mutations reveal the barring pattern in chickens.

'Three-parent' baby born in Ukraine using new technique

Kiev - A baby boy has been born in Ukraine to an infertile couple after the first ever use of a new technique using the DNA of three parents, the head of a Kiev fertility clinic said Wednesday.

Genetic basis of why carnivores eat meat discovered

Researchers have discovered the genetic basis of meat eating. This has come about after a review of the genomes of leopards, tigers, killer whales and Tasmanian devils. The research also raises questions about extinction.

Britain first country to approve 'three-parent' babies

London - Britain is set to become the first country in the world to legally offer "three-parent baby" fertility treatments after regulators gave the green light.

Britain first country to approve 'three-parent' babies

London - Britain is set to become the first country in the world to legally offer "three-parent baby" fertility treatments after regulators gave the green light.

Britain first country to approve 'three-parent' babies

London - Britain is set to become the first country in the world to legally offer "three-parent baby" fertility treatments after regulators gave the green light.

Breakthrough in personalized medicine research

Researchers have made an advancement with personalized medicines (or ‘precision medicines’) against a number of diseases currently classed as incurable. These are all genetic diseases.

New evidence of a genetic reason for autism

The causes of autism are varied. However one reason for some people with an autism spectrum disorder is likely to be genetic. New research has identified a new genetic cause.

Fight over revolutionary genetic advance goes to court in US

Alexandria - A fierce legal battle over the patent for a revolutionary gene-editing technique played out Tuesday in a US court, with billions of dollars at stake.

Essential Science: Zeroing in on a gene that stops you drinking

A large study has pinpointed a gene variant that suppresses the desire of a person to drink alcohol. The next question is whether the discovery can be used for medicinal purposes.

Genetics reveals my some people have 'wild hair'

Berlin - Struggling with unmanageable hair? Struggling with hair that won't style or comb? The various states of uncomfortable hair have been attributed, in new scientific research, to genetics.

One bull gave rise to two million great-grandaughters

One bull, called Pawnee Farm Arlinda Chief, had more than two million great-granddaughters, making him the most successful bovine in history. However, it also appears he had a genetic defect and this has spread through Holstein populations.

Great white sharks and tuna share predatory instincts

Great white sharks and tuna are both efficient predators within their domains. New research suggests this is due to genetic similarities. This is despite the two species splitting 400 million years ago.

Scientists found cell programming technique to treat eye diseases

A team of researchers discovered a new reprogramming technique that transforms retina support cells into stem cells, paving the way to new potential treatments for eye diseases such as macular degeneration and glaucoma.

Scientists map the ‘dark matter’ of DNA

Saarland - Understanding DNA variations can inform about health risks and it can also provide the basis for personalized medicine. There are still some knowledge gaps — which some call the ‘dark matter' of DNA.

Can genetics explain our food preferences?

Meat, vegetables or fish? Whether craving pasta or a chocolate bar our food preferences appear to have a genetic basis, according to a new study.

Heart defects stem from complex mutation web

New research suggests that pinpointing the cause of congenital heart defects will be very difficult, given that the condition relates to a complex web of genetic mutations from across the entire body.

The genetic roots of crime are making scientists nervous

There is no easy explanation for why some people commit crimes and others don't. Similarly, there's no easy answer to the question of why some people end up in jails and prisons while others do not.

Essential Science: Should we worry about gene extinction?

Honolulu - A consortium of scientists has expressed concern about ‘gene extinction’ technology (or 'gene drives'), claiming it could lead to species loss. Digital Journal examines this controversial field.

Scientists think it's possible to reverse the aging process

The fountain of youth may be a myth but a gene called Nanog might lead to the same effect. A new research breakthrough could bring with it treatments for conditions like atherosclerosis, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s.

It’s all in the genes: Why some chickens are bird flu resistant

Lincoln - Combating the risks associated with bird flu is of global importance. While some research focuses on treatment, and other parts on addressing transmission, another strand looks at patterns of susceptibility.

The Dolly legacy: Are you eating cloned meat?

Paris - Two decades after Scotland's Dolly the sheep became the first cloned mammal, consumers may well wonder whether they are drinking milk or eating meat from cookie-cutter cows or their offspring.The simple answer: "probably".

Fido forever? South Korea's dog cloning clinic

Seoul - At $100,000 a head, the puppies frolicking around the fenced lawn in western Seoul don't come cheap -- but at least their owners know exactly what they are getting.
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Genetics Image

Representative image of the region of the brain affected by Huntington Disease.
Representative image of the region of the brain affected by Huntington Disease.
Susann Schweiger
Tulip poplar  or yellow poplar  (Liriodendron tulipifera)  closeup looking into flower on leafy bran...
Tulip poplar, or yellow poplar, (Liriodendron tulipifera), closeup looking into flower on leafy branch.
Dcrjsr
CRISPR -  revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA.
CRISPR - revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA.
UC Berkeley
Untitled
Warner Bros
DNA double helix
DNA double helix
Peter Alfred Hess
Richard Wolfenden  PhD
Richard Wolfenden, PhD
Max Englund, UNC School of Medicine
Professor David Sinclair  an Australian scientist and entrepreneur
Professor David Sinclair, an Australian scientist and entrepreneur
Harvard College