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Genetics News

Captive-bred salmon in wild may do more harm than good

Paris - Releasing captive-bred Atlantic salmon into the ocean, a long-standing practice to boost stocks for commercial fishing, reduces the rate at which wild populations reproduce and may ultimately do more harm than good, researchers cautioned Wednesday.

Swede on trial for murder after DNA hit on genealogy site

Stockholm - A 37-year-old man went on trial Tuesday for a double murder that went unsolved and gripped Sweden for more than 15 years until police matched his DNA on a popular genealogy website.

Hong Kong: first 'proven' case of COVID reinfection

Paris - Researchers in Hong Kong Monday identified what they said was the first confirmed case worldwide of COVID-19 reinfection, raising questions about the durability of immunity, whether acquired naturally or with a vaccine.

Dark history of transatlantic slavery traced through DNA study

Washington - A new DNA study published Thursday sheds fresh light on the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade, from the legacy of rape that can be seen in today's genetics to how disease likely decimated some groups forced to work in deadly conditions.

Using AI to pinpoint disease-linked genes

Scientists have pioneered a method to locate disease-related genes, based on the application of artificial intelligence. The specially developed artificial neural network has revealed patterns across vast quantities of gene expression data.

Q&A: How nutrients, exercise, and stress can change your genes Special

Is it possible to change your genes? Amid advanced and personalized medicine, science has revealed that general strategies in diet, exercise, and stress reduction are more important than you might think. Dr. Robyn Murphy explains more.

Why gene therapy is set to transform medicine

Advances in gene therapy offer the possibility to transform medicine. These types of medicines were given their first market approvals in 2017, and since then sector growth has accelerated.

China jails scientist who gene-edited babies

Bejing - A Chinese court on Monday sentenced the scientist who claimed to be behind the world's first gene-edited babies to three years in prison for illegal medical practice, state media reported.

China jails scientist who gene-edited babies

Bejing - A Chinese court on Monday sentenced the doctor who claimed to be behind the world's first gene-edited babies to three years in prison for illegal medical practice, state media reported.

Humanity's homeland found in ancient Botswana

Paris - Modern humans emerged 200,000 years ago in a region of northern Botswana, scientists claimed Monday, in what appeared to be the most precise location of mankind's "ancestral homeland" yet discovered.

Ancient DNA study illuminates Indo-European language origins

Washington - For decades, researchers have debated how Indo-European languages came to be spoken from the British Isles to South Asia.

WHO launches genetic research register after designer-baby scandal

Geneva - The WHO announced Thursday it will create a global registry to track research into human genetic manipulation, after a call to halt all work on germline genome editing -- used in China last year to genetically modify twin baby girls.

Can short bouts of exercise boost brain function?

Can short periods of exercise help to boost brain function? Possibly, according to new research. This relates to the discovery of a gene that is activated by brief periods of exercise.

China tightens rules on genetic research after designer-baby scandal

Bejing - China has announced regulations to curb the smuggling of human organs and tighten oversight on the use of human genetic materials in research months after a Chinese scientist caused a global outcry by claiming that he gene-edited babies.

China gene babies' mutation linked to higher mortality: study

Paris - The genetic mutation given to Chinese twins last year rendering them immune to the HIV virus may significantly reduce life expectancy, scientists said Monday in a fresh warning against human gene-editing.

Northwestern-UIUC researchers launch Illinois’ new twins registry

Northwestern-UIUC scientists have created the Illinois Twins Project (ITP). This is designed to be the first- database to function as scientific resource for scientists exploring how genes and environment influence twins and multiples.

Cracking open the peanut genome

Atlanta - U.S. scientists have cracked the peanut genome for the first time. The new genome map provides insights into ancestry and diversity of today's peanuts, and will assist with boosting agricultural production.

EU sets out plans for giant biometric database

The European Union is to go ahead with developing a giant biometric database, containing information pertaining to EU and non-EU citizens. The objective is to use the searchable system to assist with crime, border control and inward migration.

Gene editing CRISPR treats lethal lung diseases before birth

Scientists in the U.S. have used the gene editing tool CRISPR in order to treat lethal lung diseases, before birth. This proof-of-concept study could lead to several inherited genetic diseases being addressed.

Mother of 3-DNA baby praises new fertility treatment

Atenas - The Greek mother of the first baby born using DNA from three people on Friday praised the revolutionary technique that helped her conceive -- and thanked the mystery woman who donated her egg.

Family Tree DNA can trade privacy to catch criminals

One of the growing number of home DNA kit providers - Family Tree DNA - is to survey users to see if it can share genetic data to aid law enforcement in tracking down criminals.

Scientists take step forward towards spinal cord regeneration

New research may unlock the secret as to why some vertebrates have the ability to regenerate their spinal cords and some do not. The genes identified may possibly hold the key to one day regenerating human spinal cords.

CRISPR could treat rare brain disorder in unborn babies

New research, based on the technique CRISPR and using a benign virus, could be used to treat a rare brain disorder in unborn babies. The virus functions to switch on certain genes.

China's second gene-edited foetus is 12-14 weeks old: scientist

Bejing - The second woman carrying a gene-edited foetus in China could now be 12 to 14 weeks into her pregnancy, according to a US physician in close contact with the researcher who claimed to have created the world's first genetically-modified babies last year...

Artificial intelligence identifies an unknown human ancestor

Applying artificial intelligence to genomes of Asian individuals has enabled scientists to identify an unknown human ancestor — a hominid who crossbred with its ancestors tens of thousands of years ago.

Scientist who genetically engineered human babies, detained

In November 2018 it was widely reported that Professor He Jiankui had genetically edited human babies, which brought widespread condemnation. Now the researcher has been, reportedly, detained by Chinese authorities.

China AIDS group 'really regrets' role in gene-editing

Bejing - The head of a Chinese AIDS support group expressed deep regret Friday for helping a scientist recruit participants for a controversial experiment claiming to have created the world's first genetically-edited babies.

China halts activities of baby gene-editing scientist

Bejing - A Chinese scientist who stoked criticism over his claim that he had created the world's first genetically-edited babies faced mounting pressure Thursday as China ordered a halt to his scientific activities and warned he may have broken the law.

China orders halt to baby gene-editing activities: state TV

Bejing - China's science ministry has ordered that people involved in the controversial baby gene-editing experiment halt their activities, a government official told state media Thursday.

Science conference slams 'deeply disturbing' baby gene-editing claim

Fpo - A scientist who upended a Hong Kong conference with his claim to have created the world's first genetically-edited babies cancelled a fresh talk and was heavily criticised by organisers Thursday, who labelled him as irresponsible.
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Genetics Image

Untitled
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
Untitled
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
CRISPR -  revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA.
CRISPR - revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA.
Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley
Tulip poplar  or yellow poplar  (Liriodendron tulipifera)  closeup looking into flower on leafy bran...
Tulip poplar, or yellow poplar, (Liriodendron tulipifera), closeup looking into flower on leafy branch.
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Heather Dewey-Hagborg’s three-dimensional printed portrait - Sequencing the DNA from chucked cigar...
Heather Dewey-Hagborg’s three-dimensional printed portrait - Sequencing the DNA from chucked cigarette butts and spat-out lumps of gum that she found on the street, she has picked out the genetic markers that influence physical appearance and created a portrait.
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 ...
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 million years ago.
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
MinION is a portable  real-time device for DNA and RNA sequencing  ... analysis in whole genomes  wh...
MinION is a portable, real-time device for DNA and RNA sequencing, ... analysis in whole genomes, whole genome assembly, targeted sequencing.
Untitled
Warner Bros
DNA double helix
DNA double helix
Peter Alfred Hess (CC BY 2.0)
Professor David Sinclair  an Australian scientist and entrepreneur
Professor David Sinclair, an Australian scientist and entrepreneur
Harvard College
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 ...
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor (pictured in the centre) that lived 140 million years ago. To find out what this flower may looked like, the study used the evolutionary tree (here simplified) that connects all living species of flowering plants
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))
Untitled
(Hervé Sauquet & Jürg Schönenberger (Nature.com CC-4.0))

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