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Doggerland News

Parts of Doggerland survived a tsunami that hit 8,000 years ago

A new study suggests that parts of Doggerland, the land that once connected Britain with continental Europe, survived the devastation of the Storegga tsunami that struck the coast of the North Sea more than 8,000 years ago.

Ancient Ice Age forest found underwater off Norfolk coast

Imagine if you will, seeing a forest of 10,000-year old Oak trees, the branches reaching out 8 meters (26 feet) from the trunks. Diver Dawn Watson, 45, saw this remarkable forest, under the sea, 300 meters off the coast of Cley next to the sea, Norfolk.

North Sea ‘Atlantis’ abandoned after 5m tsunami, study says

After watching the sea waters slowly rise around them for thousands of years, the people of Doggerland abandoned the prehistoric settlement for good after a tsunami caused by an undersea landslide 8,000 years ago.
 

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The forest would have  looked like a scene from the Hobbit or Lord of the Rings.  says Rob Spray.
The forest would have "looked like a scene from the Hobbit or Lord of the Rings." says Rob Spray.
YouTube
The felled Oaks now serve as a reef for marine life.
The felled Oaks now serve as a reef for marine life.
YouTube
The prehistoric forest that covered parts of Doggerland has been found.
The prehistoric forest that covered parts of Doggerland has been found.
YouTube
Photo taken March 11  2011  by Sadatsugu Tomizawa and released via Jiji Press on March 21  2011  sho...
Photo taken March 11, 2011, by Sadatsugu Tomizawa and released via Jiji Press on March 21, 2011, showing tsunami waves hitting the coast of Minamisoma in Fukushima prefecture, Japan.
NASA / Sadatsugu Tomizawa CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
The Oak trees were felled and lying intact on the ocean floor.
The Oak trees were felled and lying intact on the ocean floor.
YouTube
Excavated dwellings at Skara Brae (Orkney  Scotland)  Europe s most complete Neolithic village.
Excavated dwellings at Skara Brae (Orkney, Scotland), Europe's most complete Neolithic village.
Wknight94 (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Reconstruction of a  temporary  Mesolithic house in Ireland; waterside sites offered good food resou...
Reconstruction of a "temporary" Mesolithic house in Ireland; waterside sites offered good food resources.
David Hawgood (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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