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Climate change News

Mysterious disease killing world's third largest coral reef

Something is killing Florida's coral. Wide swaths of healthy coral have been turned into ghostly skeletons along the 360-mile long stretch the barrier reef, the third largest of its kind in the world.

Veridium teams with IBM and Stellar on carbon credit blockchain

Veridium Labs is collaborating with IBM to help transform the carbon credit market using IBM blockchain technology with the goal of making it easier for companies to offset their environmental footprints.

Trump quietly kills NASA greenhouse gas monitoring program

Apparently, withdrawing from the Paris climate accord wasn't enough. Now, the Trump administration wants to restrict the world's ability to measure carbon emissions.

Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 break new record

Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have set a new and worrying record. For the first time in recorded history, levels of CO2 averaged higher than 410 parts per million (ppm) for the entire month of April.

How electric vehicles are charged in China affects air quality

Beijing - Researchers from Harvard University and Tsinghua University in Beijing found that private electric vehicles in China can have a positive effect on CO2 reduction if owners can be incentivized to slowly charge vehicles during off-peak hours.

Study: More fires and drought will lead to fewer trees in Klamath

The increase in fires and summer drought brought on by climate change is increasingly altering the type of tree species and the carbon sequestration of forest landscapes, particularly in the Klamath region of the United States.

U.S. and UK join forces in biggest ever Antarctic field campaign

The UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF) are getting ready to deploy about 100 scientists to the Thwaites glacier in West Antarctica as part of a five-year study to find out how fast it is melting.

New study makes the case for supply-side climate change policies

It has been difficult to come to a global consensus on what are the best policies for mitigating the effects of climate change. A new study out this month suggests the unspeakable - restricting the supply of fossil fuels.

UCLA study forecasts a severe climate future for California

Los Angeles - A study published on Monday by climate scientists at UCLA forecasts wild extremes of drought and flooding in California as the climate continues to warm.

One impact of climate change occurring in U.S. no one hears about

A boundary that divides the humid eastern U.S. and the dry western Plains appears to have shifted 140 miles to the east over the past century due to global warming, new research suggests. How will this affect farming and agriculture in the years to come?

Abnormally warm Atlantic waters found off Nova Scotia

Halifax - While Nova Scotia, Canada was digging out from a spring snowstorm this week, about 200 kilometers (124 miles) off the coast, scientists were recording record-high ocean temperatures in deep water that reached 14 degrees Celsius (57 degrees Fahrenheit).

Slow down of Atlantic Ocean circulation is bad news for everyone

The Atlantic Ocean circulation that carries warmth into the Northern Hemisphere’s high latitudes is slowing down because of climate change - and is at its weakest point in the past 1,600 years.

A discussion on transitioning to a green economy — Part 1

Concerned that workers will be left out of jobs as countries transition to a green economy, the International Trade Union Confederation is advocating for a clear and fair transition plan for employees when it comes to this kind of industry-wide changes.

High Arctic sea ice breaking off and moving toward coastlines

Footage shot across the North Atlantic captured a stunning view of accumulating sea ice over Brighton, Newfoundland. According to researchers, this also serves as a stark reminder of the impact of climate change.

Glacier ice loss has reached the 'point of no return'

Glacier ice loss is a key contributor to sea-level change, slope instability in high-mountain regions, and changing volumes of river flow. A new study shows that we cannot stop glacial melting in this century - no matter what we do.

Western states, B.C. united despite lack of U.S. leadership

Officials representing British Columbia, Washington state, Oregon, and California met Friday at the Pan Pacific Vancouver Hotel in B.C. to mark the 10th anniversary of the Pacific Coast Collaborative (PCC).

Parts of California's Bay Area sinking faster than expected

San Francisco - Current global projection maps depicting sea level rise are what city managers and planners depend on for future development, however, coastal subsidence has very seldom been considered in making these projections. The Bay Area is a good example.

Looking to the skies: How aerosols affect clouds

Global climate is a very complex phenomenon. To understand one aspect, the use of human-made aerosols, researchers have been studying the effects of sprays on clouds.

Changing tundra vegetation spells change for Arctic animals

For well over two decades, scientists have kept track of the changes occurring in the Arctic tundra habitat. Ankle-high grasses and sedges have given way to a sea of woody shrubs, some growing to neck-deep heights as the climate warms.

Understanding ocean turbulence improves climate science

According to a new study a more in-depth understanding of ocean turbulence could improve existing climate models and proved a more accurate prediction of climate change.

Snowpack levels in western U.S. show 'dramatic' decline

A new study of long-term snow monitoring sites in the western United States found declines in snowpack at more than 90 percent of those sites - and one-third of the declines were deemed significant.

New study — Climate change threatens major crops in California

Over the last 10-years, farmers in California have experienced the symptoms of climate change — less winter chill, crops blooming earlier, more heat waves and years of drought when the state baked in record temperatures.

Beech trees take over northeastern U.S. and it's not a good thing

The increased temperatures and precipitation brought about by climate change have made it possible for beech trees to thrive in the northeastern U.S. and Southern Canada, and researchers say this is not a good thing.

Weather will remain predictable despite climate change

Although the temperature of the Earth is becoming warmer and climate change is causing adverse effects worldwide, the act of forecasting the weather will remain consistent over the next thirty years, according to new research.

Coal continues its downward slide as more coal-fired plants close

More coal plant capacity was shuttered in the first 45 days of 2018 than in the entire first three years of the Obama administration, according to Sierra Club and Energy Information Administration (EIA) data.

Thawing Arctic permafrost could release huge amounts of mercury

According to a new study published this month, there may be more than 15 million gallons of toxic mercury buried in the permafrost of the Northern Hemisphere. As the permafrost melts, all that mercury will be released.

Op-Ed: Natural gas is part of the climate problem, not the solution

The last 10 years have seen coal being replaced by cheaper and cleaner energy sources, like renewables and natural gas. And while coal use has dropped 44 percent, LNG use has risen by 45 percent.

Op-Ed: Can AI deal with climate change AND human stupidity?

Sydney - It’s official; predicting the weather is now very difficult, thanks to climate change. The weird jet streams, heat, floods and droughts are hitting hard, and knowing what happens next is crucial.

EPA - Government must prepare Superfund sites for climate change

An official with the Environmental Protection Agency program that directs cleaning up the nation’s most contaminated properties and waterways told Congress on Thursday that the government needs to plan for the ongoing threat posed by climate change.

'Climate envelope' responsible for mass deaths of Saiga antelopes

Over the span of three weeks in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in central Kazakhstan from hemorrhagic septicemia caused by a normally harmless bacteria called Pasteurella multocida type B. Now, scientists know what happened.
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This Aug. 8  2015 photo supplied by U.S. Army show an aerial view of Kwajalein Atoll  where a Space ...
This Aug. 8, 2015 photo supplied by U.S. Army show an aerial view of Kwajalein Atoll, where a Space Fence complex is being built in the Marshall Islands. The US military ignored warnings about rising seas to build a space radar costing nearly a billion dollars on a tiny atoll in the Marshall Islands.
U.S. Army
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Wikimedia commons
The future outlook of developing nations looks bleak. Should developed nations be held accountable f...
The future outlook of developing nations looks bleak. Should developed nations be held accountable for the genocide?
globalpovertyproject.com
Cordyceps: mushrooms that are actually mummified bodies of caterpillars
Cordyceps: mushrooms that are actually mummified bodies of caterpillars
Glacial lakes are growing in area in the Earth s Third Pole region. This is a photo of a  glacier in...
Glacial lakes are growing in area in the Earth's Third Pole region. This is a photo of a glacier in Central Tien Shan in Kazakhstan.
WWF
From left to right: Hon Jim Carr  Minister of Energy  Canada; Hon Wan Gang  Minister of Science and ...
From left to right: Hon Jim Carr, Minister of Energy, Canada; Hon Wan Gang, Minister of Science and Technology, China; Dr Fatih Birol, Executive Director, International Energy Agency; Hon Rick Perry, Secretary of Energy, USA; Hon Terje Søviknes, Minister of Petroleum and Energy, Norway.
IEA
Pocahontas coal plant in Eastgulf  West Virginia. Photo taken in 2014.
Pocahontas coal plant in Eastgulf, West Virginia. Photo taken in 2014.
Magnolia677
In Shagra  North Darfur  water is hard to come by.
In Shagra, North Darfur, water is hard to come by.
UNEP
COP22 president Salaheddine Mezouar attends the opening session of climate talks in Marrakesh on Nov...
COP22 president Salaheddine Mezouar attends the opening session of climate talks in Marrakesh on November 7, 2016
Fadel Senna, AFP
May showing U.S. vector range for Dengue fever and number of suspected cases.
May showing U.S. vector range for Dengue fever and number of suspected cases.
NRDC
Melting permafrost leads to massive collapse of ground creating a crater.
Melting permafrost leads to massive collapse of ground creating a crater.
Juiian Murton/Cambridge University
This is what the White House website looks like now.
This is what the White House website looks like now.
White House website
The world is sitting up and taking notice of what is happening to our planet.
The world is sitting up and taking notice of what is happening to our planet.
EPA
Ford C-MAX Solar Energi Concept car
Ford C-MAX Solar Energi Concept car
Ford Motor Company
Too many people with too much livestock have rendered Laikipia's rangeland unliveable for the g...
Too many people with too much livestock have rendered Laikipia's rangeland unliveable for the growing population, exacerbated by climate change.
, AFP
People s Climate March  Edmonton.
People's Climate March, Edmonton.
Signs urge local action for global issues
Signs urge local action for global issues
People s Climate March  Edmonton.
People's Climate March, Edmonton.
People s Climate March  Edmonton.
People's Climate March, Edmonton.
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