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Bats News

Vampire bat's blood-only diet 'a big evolutionary win'

Paris - At first glance, the cost-benefit ratio of a blood-only diet suggests that vampire bats -- the only mammals to feed exclusively on the viscous, ruby-red elixir -- flew down an evolutionary blind alley.

New study: UV light may save bats from deadly fungus

White-nose syndrome is a disease caused by a fungus that infects bat populations in the U.S. and Canada while they hibernate during the winter. However, new studies suggest the fungus may have an "Achilles' heel" - UV light.

Virus helps to track white nose syndrome in bats

A newly discovered virus, that infects the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, could provide the means to track the spread of the disease. The fungus is killing huge numbers of bat populations in the U.S and Canada.

White-nose syndrome has crossed the Rocky Mountains

Seattle - White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a particularly nasty fungal disease that has so far killed off over 7 million bats in the eastern U.S. since it mysteriously appeared 10 years ago. Recent evidence now shows it has spread across the country.

Vampire bats vomit up blood to share with others

Panama - Stomach turning fact of the week: vampire bats vomit up blood they have recently eaten and share it with their fellow bats.

Studying bats leads to better aeroplanes

Many aspects of the animal world have been borrowed by humans in the process of creating objects and technology. Bats, for example, aided radar. Bats can also, a new study found, help us to fly aircraft better.

Bats mount partial response against white nose syndrome

White-nose syndrome is a devastating infection of bats in North America, striking bats while they are hibernating in caves. As a sign of better news, some bats appear to be developing an immune response.

Snake fungus causing havoc in North America

Washington - Snakes in North America are under threat from a fungus similar to the "white nose" disease that has been affecting bat populations. New research draws parallels between the two diseases.

Germany turns military bases into 77,000 acre wildlife sanctuary

Where once there was war, there shall now be nature. The German government has announced plans to turn 62 defunct military bases west of the Iron Curtain into nature reserves for wildlife, including eagles, bats, woodpeckers, and beetles.

Bats identified as the source of MERS

Seoul - MERS is currently causing renewed health concerns around the world, with cases up in South Korea and China. Scientists remained puzzled over how MEMR first came to infect people. A popular theory is via bats.

Understanding how white-nose syndrome kills bats

Researchers have uncovered the way that white-nose syndrome breaks down tissue in bats. This finding could lead to a treatment for a disease that has killed more than six million bats across North America.

Why bats don’t crash into each other is revealed

This may seem like the start of a riddle, but why don’t bats fly into each other? The answer lies in bats seemingly following some agreed rules of the air.

Bat avoidance tactics of the Luna moth

New research has shown how Luna moths can use their long tails to throw bats off their trail. This avoids them being eaten by the flying predators.

New understanding about how white-nose syndrome kills bats

Madison - Researchers have developed an explanation of how white-nose syndrome kills bats. The fungal infection has been devastating bat populations across in North America.

Ebola point of origin traced to bats

Conakry - The Ebola epidemic in West Africa may have been triggered by bats in Guinea, according to a new research paper. However, other scientists question this theory due to a lack of evidence.

Hollow tree in Guinea was possible site of Ebola's Ground Zero

Paris - Insect-eating bats that inhabited a hollow tree in a remote village in Guinea may have been the source of the world's biggest Ebola epidemic, scientists said on Tuesday.

Hollow tree was Ebola's Ground Zero: Scientists

Paris - Insect-eating bats that inhabited a hollow tree in a remote village in Guinea may have been the source of the world's biggest Ebola epidemic, scientists said on Tuesday.

British bat numbers increase after years of decline

Numbers of bats from the the most common species found in the U.K. are stable or increasing following several years of decline. The rise in bat populations has come from a key citizen science project.

Deadly bat disease follows seasonal patterns

The infectious fungal disease of bats called white-nose syndrome appears linked, in part, to the seasonal dynamics of infection and transmission. This is based on a new study.

Bat navigation revealed

Two new papers show how bats navigate their environments. It seems that the flying mammals have specialized brain cells that track their movements as they navigate through space and utilize a series of audible clicks.

Holy hijinks Batman! Bats scramble each other's calls for food

Here's a skill that Batman might wish he had: Scientists have discovered that some bats can mess up each other's chances of snagging a meal. Just think: Batman could put the bad guys on a diet by doing this. He could starve them into behaving.

Ebola: patient zero identified

Biologists have pinpointed the source of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Patient zero was probably a 2-year-old boy who died in southern Guinea.

Nocturnal bats invade Indian Sun Temple

Of the many things that could possibly wreck havoc in a Sun Temple, nocturnal bats would probably be last on the list. But that's precisely what is happening in Modhera Sun Temple in India.

Tracking bats could help halt Ebola spread

Various actions are being undertaken to fight the Ebola virus that is sweeping across parts of West Africa, and resulting in a mounting death toll. As the main vector is bats, some scientists think that tracking bats is one way to combat the disease.

Bats use echolocation to hunt for túngara frogs

A new study has shown how male túngara frogs are easily detected and eaten by bats. Because the frogs bellow, the bats can find them through echolocation.

MERS transmission link between bats and humans revealed

The mechanism used by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus to transmit from bats to humans has been identified by researchers. The finding could be critical for preventing and controlling the spread of MERS and related viruses in humans.

Not such a bitter taste for Vampire bats

Wuhan - Vampire bats exist on a diet mainly made up of blood. Due to this, the flying mammals have largely lost the ability to taste bitter flavors, according to a new study.

Deadly bat disease set to spread

North American bats face a death toll approaching 7 million due to a fungus called white nose syndrome. As part of the campaign to help eliminate the killer disease, scientists have obtained a new insight into how the fungus spreads. The news is not good.

African fruit bats carry deadly viruses

A study of African fruit bats has revealed that thirty-four per cent of the bats had been infected with Lagos bat virus and 42 per cent had been infected with henipaviruses.

Are camels linked to MERS?

A Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) patient’s pet camel has tested positive for the coronavirus. This has re-opened the debate over how the virus is being spread.
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Bracken cave  in Texas  is well known for its huge colonies of Mexican free-tailed bats.
Bracken cave, in Texas, is well known for its huge colonies of Mexican free-tailed bats.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
The current distribution of White-nose Syndrome.
The current distribution of White-nose Syndrome.
Bat Conservation International
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
A bat found in the Tirau Honey Museum
A bat found in the Tirau Honey Museum
possumgirl2
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
An orphaned baby bat at Australian Bat Clinic & Wildlife Trauma Centre
An orphaned baby bat at Australian Bat Clinic & Wildlife Trauma Centre
Screen Capture
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
Common bat
A small bat
H G M
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
The Royal Ontario Museum has two new exhibits: Bats! and dinosaur baby eggs.
Eidolon helvum  Zoological Garden Berlin  Germany
Eidolon helvum, Zoological Garden Berlin, Germany
Fritz Geller-Grimm
Warmer colours highlight areas predicted to be of greatest value for discovering novel zoonotic viru...
Warmer colours highlight areas predicted to be of greatest value for discovering novel zoonotic viruses, via bats.
Nature / EcoHealth Alliance