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article imageThe Queen sends her first tweet

By Tim Sandle     Oct 26, 2014 in Technology
London - The Queen has sent her first tweet. The Twitter message was posted at the launch of a new Science Museum gallery in London.
Queen Elizabeth's first tweet, sent through the @BritishMonarchy account, went: "It is a pleasure to open the Information Age exhibition today at the @ScienceMuseum and I hope people will enjoy visiting. Elizabeth R."
Up until that historic moment, the Twitter account had been looked after by palace officials (the page has more than 760,000 followers). The Queen has been at the cutting edge of new technology before. She made her first live Christmas broadcast in 1957 and in 1976, she became the first monarch in the world to send an email.
The Queen sent the message as part of a new gallery, called The Information Age, at London's Science Museum. The gallery has taken three years to develop and it contains many interactive exhibits. The gallery traces the history and development of communications and computing.
Among the highlights from the 800 objects on display, are:
The first transatlantic telegraph cable which connected Europe and North America.
The broadcast equipment behind the BBC's first radio program in 1922.
A 1950s telephone exchange.
Sir Tim Berners-Lee's NeXT computer, which hosted the first website.
And behind the scenes technology that explains how the modern smartphone works.
The gallery is divided into six zones, each representing a different information and communication technology network: The Cable, The Telephone Exchange, Broadcast, The Constellation, The Cell and The Web.
The gallery's chief curator Tilly Blyth told the BBC: "We really want them to see that our predecessors lived through similar periods of change. Ours isn't the only revolution - just the latest. in a series of transformations since the electric telegraph in the 1830s."
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