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article imageDetachable 2-in-1 Samsung Chromebook could be on the way

By James Walker     Nov 23, 2017 in Technology
Samsung could be building a detachable 2-in-1 Chromebook powered by an Intel Kaby Lake processor. The device is expected to help spearhead Google's plans to release Chromebooks with distinct tablet and laptop experiences, akin to Windows machines.
Chrome OS has had the ability to run Android apps for a while now but there's still only a handful of devices positioned to take full advantage of the capability. Creating a 2-in-1 Chromebook is a logical next step, offering a true hybrid between a Chrome OS laptop and an Android tablet.
Evidence for one such device from Samsung was found by Chrome Unboxed inside the Chromium source code repository. An experimental device known as "Nautilus" cropped up in the code, attached to an engineer called Jongpin Jung. Although no manufacturer name is mentioned, Mr Jung's credentials have been associated with previous Samsung devices found in the Chromium source.
Not a lot is known about the device except it appears to be a detachable built around the latest Chrome OS features. The code contains references to a "base" and "tablet mode," strongly implying the form factor will be akin to popular 2-in-1 Windows laptops capable of morphing into tablets. This will help to diversify the Chrome OS ecosystem and could attract more consumers who need the versatility of a 2-in-1 device.
Samsung Galaxy Book
Samsung Galaxy Book
Samsung
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The design inspiration is likely to be Samsung's own Windows detachable, the 10.6-inch or 12-inch Galaxy Book. It's unclear whether multiple display sizes will be offered on the Chrome OS device.
One shared component does seem to be confirmed as the Chromium repository points to the use of an Intel Kaby Lake processor. It's probable Samsung will reuse much of its Galaxy Book hardware, including the stylus capabilities.
The existence of Chrome OS detachables and tablets has been rumoured for almost a year. So far, no manufacturer has actually released a device though, leaving the platform's Android compatibility without any touchscreen-oriented hardware. If Samsung's "Nautilus" reaches markets, Google will be able to pitch Chrome OS to a wider audience of creatives and professionals who want to use the platform but need touch input, a stylus and a keyboard.
There's no indication of when Samsung might be ready to launch the detachable. There's a chance it will be unveiled at the company's next major product reveal during CES 2018 in January. The company's also expected to unveil its Galaxy S9 smartphone during the event, possibly including a new focus on artificial intelligence features.
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