Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
    Log in with Twitter

article imageIntelligent sensor network for harvesting machines developed

By Karen Graham     Oct 28, 2017 in Technology
Bielefeld - An innovative new system has been developed that will make it safer and more efficient to operate tractors and combine harvesters under changing crop densities and differing conditions in the terrain.
An innovative project to develop a networked system with sensors that would enable harvest machinery to automatically recognize its surroundings and react to changes was started in July 2014 and ran through the end of October 2017.
The project was a collaboration between Bielefeld University's Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC) in Bielefeld, Germany, and CLAAS, an agricultural machinery manufacturing corporation located in Harsewinkel, Germany. The results of the project were presented October 24 at a workshop in the CITEC Building.
Pictured from the left: Dr. Thorsten Jungeblut (CITEC)  Dr. Boris Kettelhoit (CLAAS)  Prof. Dr. Ulri...
Pictured from the left: Dr. Thorsten Jungeblut (CITEC), Dr. Boris Kettelhoit (CLAAS), Prof. Dr. Ulrich Rückert, Timo Korthals (both CITEC), and Thilo Krause (CLAAS). Foto: CITEC/Bielefeld University.
Bielefeld University
In talking about the primary goal of the project, CITEC researcher Dr. Thorsten Jungeblut, who coordinates the project together with Dr. Boris Kettelhoit from CLAAS, said harvesting machinery often have to operate under difficult conditions, such as muddy fields or even rocky terrain. And the harvest machine operator has only a limited view that is often obscured by plants.
But with the newly developed system for environment detection, Dr. JungeblutIn says, "this way, the machines can adjust their operation based on the conditions of the field -- both its state and the crops present."
Development of the sensor system
Because harvest combines are sometimes as long as a truck. "We, therefore, had to develop a system that ensures that collisions are prevented, for example with wild animals," says Dr. Jungeblut.
In the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest of the United States the combine is retrofitted with ...
In the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest of the United States the combine is retrofitted with a hydraulic hillside leveling system. This allows the combine to harvest the steep but fertile soil in the region.
Lynn Suckow from Walla Walla, WA.
The CITEC group researched resource-efficient and microelectronic systems, which are equipped with sensors such as color and infrared cameras, heat-detecting, or distance sensors. For three years, CITEC and CLAAS, working together developed an intelligent sensor network for electronic environment detection in agricultural harvesting machines.
CITEC researchers also contributed algorithms that analyze sensor data to the project. "Sensor data is combined together and evaluated so that the machine can assess the environment on its own, enabling it to adjust to changing conditions," explained Dr. Jungeblut. "In addition to this, the system works across different machines. For example, the control system in a combine harvester can warn a tractor of impending obstacles."
"This new system makes agricultural harvesting machinery more efficient and safer, thus increasing the quality of crop yields," said Dr. Boris Kettelhoit, from CLAAS. "Damage to people and machines is prevented to the greatest extent possible, and stoppages are reduced."
Harvesting oats with a Claas Lexion 570 harvester with enclosed air-conditioned cab  rotary thresher...
Harvesting oats with a Claas Lexion 570 harvester with enclosed air-conditioned cab, rotary thresher and laser-guided automatic steering.
Hinrich
About CLAAS
ClAAS is an agricultural machinery manufacturer founded in 1913 and based in Harsewinkel, Ostwestfalen-Lippe, Germany. They have a broad product range that includes combine harvesters, forage harvesters, balers, mowers, rakes, tractors, tenders and other harvesting machines.
They are also the world leader in rubber tracked wheel technology for combine harvesters. CLAAS also lays claim to having the largest selling self-propelled forage harvester in the world.
More about Agriculture, digital transformation, electronic enviroment detection, Innovation, sensor network
 
Latest News
Top News