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article imageScience as art at the Francis Crick Institute Special

By Tim Sandle     Feb 18, 2018 in Science
London - A myriad of intriguing patterns exist throughout the natural world, and many of these are on display at the Francis Crick Institute in London in a new exhibition. The exhibition aims to provide a glimpse into three intricate developmental patterns.
Nature produces an array of intricate patterns. For researchers at the Crick Institute the focus is on those found in minute cellular and molecular forms. A new exhibition aims to capture the dynamic nature of such patterns as they grow, shrink, move, connect, break and rearrange.
An intricate pattern - a molecular model of the influenza virus. The influenza virion (as the infect...
An intricate pattern - a molecular model of the influenza virus. The influenza virion (as the infectious particle is called) is roughly spherical. It is an enveloped virus – that is, the outer layer is a lipid membrane which is taken from the host cell in which the virus multiplies.
The Francis Crick Institute is a biomedical research center in London.
Outside of the Francis Crick Institute  a sculpture of DNA.  A staggering 14 meters high and made of...
Outside of the Francis Crick Institute, a sculpture of DNA. A staggering 14 meters high and made of weathered steel, the sculpture entitled 'Paradigm'.
The institute, which opened in 2016, is a partnership between Cancer Research U.K., Imperial College London, King's College London, the Medical Research Council, University College London and the Wellcome Trust. The institute isthe biggest single biomedical laboratory in Europe.
Inside the Francis Crick Institute  London. The institute defines its research programme as explorin...
Inside the Francis Crick Institute, London. The institute defines its research programme as exploring "seven high-level science questions reflecting both major issues of interest in biomedical research and the current research strategies of its six founders".
The Institute is named after Francis Harry Compton Crick, who was a British molecular biologist, biophysicist, and neuroscientist, noted for being a co-discoverer of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953 with James Watson.
The Francis Crick Institute is a biomedical discovery institute dedicated to understanding the funda...
The Francis Crick Institute is a biomedical discovery institute dedicated to understanding the fundamental biology. It hosted the exhibition 'Deconstructing Patterns'.
This new exhibition, which opened in February 2018, has three artist commissions at the centerpiece. These works were developed between artists and Crick researchers. The brief was to discover alternative ways of exploring the microscopic patterns at the cellular level.
They first is a poetry and soundscape piece by Sarah Howe and Chu-Li Shewring. This is called Infinite Instructions. This looks at work undertaken by scientists in scrutinizing patterns within different areas of the human genome.
With the exhibit, visitors can stand inside giant listening devices to hear different recordings of poetry and sound.
In collaboration with Poet in the City  the Crick invited award-winning poet Sarah Howe and sound ar...
In collaboration with Poet in the City, the Crick invited award-winning poet Sarah Howe and sound artist Chu-Li Shewring to journey into the world of genomic patterning.
The composed music that is used with this part of the exhibit is called simply ‘A New Music’. It delves into the form, function and rhythm of the genome.
The second part of the exhibition is based on a sculpture and film by Helen Pynor. The work is called 'Transforming Connections', and it looks at the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The fruit fly is key to many experiments in genetics. The fly also undergoes an interesting metamorphosis as it develops.
This part of the exhibit is  an investigation into the expansion and movement of patterns in time.
This part of the exhibit is an investigation into the expansion and movement of patterns in time.
One area Crick Institute scientists are studying is how neural networks develop to form connections within the optic lobe of the fruit fly.
Part of the exhibit focusing on the fruit fly.
Part of the exhibit focusing on the fruit fly.
The third part of the exhibit is a movie produced by a young filmmaking group called KaleiKo. The exhibit is called 'Breaking Symmetry' and the move is called 'Selection'.
Part of the polarity exhibit  images of PAR proteins. Some of the PAR proteins are localized asymmet...
Part of the polarity exhibit, images of PAR proteins. Some of the PAR proteins are localized asymmetrically and form physical complexes with one another.
A related part of this exhibit display micro-pattern cubes. These allow scientists to model the changing surface structures of patterns in nature.
Micro pattern cubes for looking at the dynamic pattern of folding and reconfiguration o.f the chain-...
Micro pattern cubes for looking at the dynamic pattern of folding and reconfiguration o.f the chain-like assemblies
The movie focuses on the work of the Polarity and Patterning Networks laboratory, which is interested in understanding how cells acquire their sense of direction, which is known as polarity.
People listening and watching the movie  which explores the complexities of asymmetry and cell divis...
People listening and watching the movie, which explores the complexities of asymmetry and cell division.
To learn more about biomedical science at the work at the Institute, the exhibition is worth visiting. It achieves its aims in an unusual way, combining both artistic and scientific processes to create a novel exhibition.
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