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article imageOlympic gold medalist Cody Miller talks vlogs, technology, fans Special

By Markos Papadatos     Aug 15, 2018 in Sports
Two-time Olympic medalist swimmer Cody Miller (gold and bronze in Rio de Janeiro for Team USA) chatted with Digital Journal about his YouTube vlog, his use of technology in his daily routine, and he expressed his appreciation for his fans and followers.
Miller revealed that, presently, he is doing rehabilitation to help him heal his knees and get back into training. "I don't need surgery, but I can't do any breaststroke kick until they heal," he said. "Then, I need to get back into training and not take any more time off because that has been hurting me."
On the success of his YouTube channel, Miller said, "The channel has really grown. I am almost at 50,000 subscribers. I have had a lot of fun making the videos. A lot of people reach out to me telling me that they like the videos, and they appreciate the videos. It has opened up a whole new world to me, and it has been a lot of fun."
While he is taking a brief break from posting vlogs each Wednesday, due to rehab for his knees, he shared that in the next few weeks, he will be uploading new videos regularly. He also hopes to one day do a YouTube vlog about his pectus excavatum, to raise awareness about his congenital chest deformity.
In one of his YouTube vlogs, Miller discusses the difference between an Olympic gold medal and a World Championship gold medal.
At the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Miller won a bronze in the men's 100 meter breaststroke and a gold in the men's 4x100 meter relay as part of Team USA. "That was really exciting, and something I will never forget for sure. Total honor and I loved it," he said.
When asked if Miller would ever consider coaching, he said, "In some capacity, yes. I love the idea of being a collegiate college coach someday. I would very much like that, though I am not sure if that's the path I will go down."
Digital transformation in vlogging and aquatics
On the impact of technology on the entertainment scene, Miller said, "There is so much content out there, it's crazy. It's a good thing and a bad thing. From a creator's perspective, it is easier now more than ever to make something whether it is on social media or in a creative way. Everyone has a camera in their pocket, so the accessibility is way easier. I am still learning."
As a swimmer, Miller shared that he uses GoPro. "My main camera is a Canon EOS Rebel T6i, and I use a wide angle one. For my swimming, I use my GoPro and my iPhone, where I have a waterproof case. I feel that for swimmers having a GoPro is very essential," he said.
He continued, "We have a new system here in Indiana University, where you wear a belt and they attach a string to you. It completely measures your power output per stroke, and it tells you where your strengths and where your deficiencies are in each stroke. They also added a video component to it, so they can film you swimming and match your stroke power efficiency, and you can physically see where you are stronger and weaker, and where you need improvement."
"That is pretty cool since I am a visual learner," he admitted. "It is cool to have the data behind it, and it is interesting since you learn more about yourself thanks to the technology. Our coach Ray Looze is always pushing the boundaries on those things. We had 10 brand new digital recording devices built. We used to have the old TiVo, but now we have Apple TVs, and the camera shoots in 4K in every lane of our pool. It is very cool."
Miller had nothing but the kindest remarks about fellow American swimmer, 19-year-old Michael Andrew, who had interviewed him for his own YouTube channel. "Michael is a major up-and-coming swimmer, and he is a super nice guy. It's impossible not to like and root for a kid like that," Mille said. "Vlogging is one thing we have in common outside of the swimming world. He is also interested in video and filmography. For him, he really loves documentary film-making. We have that to talk about and it's always fun. Both of us doing videos about swimming is helping to grow the sport, as well as engaging younger swimmers. Anything like that is always a positive thing. I am sure we will collaborate more in the future."
For his fans and YouTube followers, Miller said, "It was overwhelming after the summer. I had thousands of people reaching out to me in one form or another, basically showing different levels of support. This was something I never really expected to have. I would like to send a big 'thank you' to all. I owe a great deal of gratitude to all the people that care about me and support me and watch my YouTube videos. I appreciate that."
To learn more about American Olympian Cody Miller and his vlog, check out his official YouTube channel, Instagram page, and his Facebook page.
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