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article imageScientists allegedly control evolution with embryonic experiments

By Walter McDaniel     Jul 31, 2014 in Science
According to a Nature report with contributions from scientists stationed around the world, researchers were able to regress the teeth of some mice in the embryonic stages.
If their research is correct they were able to create mice with similar teeth to ones their ancestors likely held millions of years ago. In other words they reportedly devolved these specimens. Readers can skim the report published in Nature.
Scientists did this by manipulating the chromosomes of mice in the embryonic stage. We have had this technology for some time but not all researchers are comfortable with it. Specimens will reportedly be used to check our fossil record in this area.
As for the team conducing the experiment more than a dozen highly trained researchers from across the globe participated. Chinese, European and American researchers all weighed in from organizations such as the University of Helsinki, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Victoria Museum in Melbourne. While members had larger and smaller parts all of their academic credentials check out.
For all of human history we have participated in promoting microevolution for many species. We do this with fish all the time. However if these findings are correct it could be the only living example of macroevolution, the process by which species change massively over millions of years.
If it is possible to progress mice forward on the evolutionary ladder through embryonic manipulation and not just regress them this would definitely prove macroevolution. Debates of micro vs macro have raged for as long as the evolutionary theory has existed so any team that finds living, physical evidence will change our understanding of science.
More about Science, Genetics, Embryos, Mice
 

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