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article imageNew MERS-Camel link

By Tim Sandle     May 3, 2014 in Science
Scientists have affirmed that MERS-CoV is common in camels living near areas where most of the documented human infections have occurred.
In February 204, Digital Journal reported that the coronavirus responsible for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is widespread in camels throughout Saudi Arabia and has been around for at least 20 years, according to a new study. Now new research confirms the MERS-camel connection.
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is one of the latest problem viruses to have emerged this decade. MERS-CoV is the sixth new type of coronavirus like SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome).
Columbia University’s Ian Lipkin and his colleagues have confirmed that MERS-CoV is common in camels living near areas where most of the documented human infections had occurred.
As a result of this, the World Health Organization (WHO) has advised that people avoid contact with camels in order to slow the spread of MERS. According to the Wall Street Journal, Saudi Arabian officials are launching a public health campaign aimed at informing citizens about the dangers of MERS. Ian Mackay from the University of Queensland in Australian told the WSJ that “very rapid, transparent, and comprehensive communication is one of our best weapons to keep [people safe].”
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