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science Articles
The Russian Federal Space Agency announced that it has restored contact with its Foton-M4 satellite, lost three days ago. The spacecraft carries a set of scientific tests including five geckos to study the effect of micro-gravity on their fertility.

Fat burning cancer link

Conversion of white fat to brown is associated with muscle atrophy and weight loss in cancer patients, according to a new study.

Is MERS airborne?

Researchers detect traces of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus in the air of a barn housing an infected camel.

Biologists warn earth facing 6th mass extinction

A group of biologists is warning that the growing loss of species may mean that the planet is in the early stages of a sixth mass extinction. Another group of scientists say extreme and controversial methods may be needed to slow the rate of extinction.

New autism genetic link revealed

In a new study, researchers determine that heritability outweighs non-genetic risk factors when it comes to the developmental disorder.

Schizophrenia research receives large cash donation

The philanthropist Ted Stanley has announced he will donate $650 million to psychiatric research. The donation will be used to conduct studies aimed at findings the genetic causes of the mental health disorder.

Genetic causes of schizophrenia are 'considerable'

The number of known genetic variants linked with schizophrenia has more than tripled, following a massive genome-wide association study.

Gut microbes help to detoxify rat diets

Gut microbes in Mojave Desert rats help the animals metabolize creosote toxins, according to some new research. The results demonstrated that gut microbes can enhance their rodent hosts’ ability to digest the creosote toxins.

Citizen science success with lionfish research

A sixth grader’s science project on the salinity tolerance of lionfish has been proved spot on. An academic researcher has confirmed the student’s results. The data expands knowledge about an invasive species.

Top CDC anthrax researcher resigns

The former head of a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention biosecurity laboratory has left his post following a safety review of U.S. government labs.

Elephants are the greatest 'sniffers' on the planet

African elephants have the largest number of olfactory receptor genes known in mammals, nearly twice as many as dogs have, and five times more than humans.

Can dogs 'feel jealousy?'

Dogs may have the capacity to feel human-like jealousy, according to a study. The study included diverse small dog breeds such as chihuahuas, Yorkshire terriers, and several mutts.

CDC resumes dealing with hazardous materials

A high-security tuberculosis lab at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is to return to transferring hazardous materials.

Siberian team finds evidence that most dinosaurs had feathers

According to a paper published by Russian researchers, our understanding of dinosaur tissues is wrong. Feathers may have possibly been a part of many body structures during that era.

Op-Ed: Artificial Intelligence analyzes Beatle music progression

In what may be a major leap in analytics, Lawrence Technological University has correctly identified the Beatles' music progression from their first album to their last, using Big Data technology. This is a real first, and it’s pretty fascinating stuff.

Changing oceans affecting calcification of marine organisms

The ocean is home to many creatures, and all of them take their sustenance from this environment. One group of organisms use the ocean's calcium to create their shells and exoskeletons. These are the calcifiers, the mollusks, corals and starfish.

Alaska frogs survive in freezing conditions

In subarctic Interior Alaska, wood frogs spend winter in the ground covered by duff and leaf litter in conditions where temperatures can remain below freezing for more than six months with minimum temperatures of minus four (minus 20 Celsius).

Fukushima radiation linked to Japanese monkeys’ blood count

A new report suggests that Japanese monkeys have suffered health issues likely attributable to the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011.

Sponge developed by scientists can turn light into steam energy

Mechanical engineering department head Gang Chen worked with a team to produce a spongy structure which can convert sunlight into steam. Readers who understand how useful steam energy is can understand why this is important.

China plans to build a large super collider

China has plans to build two huge super colliders in the country, including one that many have said would be the only accelerator of its kind to ever be built.

Astronomy: Most precise measurement of exoplanet to date

Aided by two NASA telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise calculation yet of the size of an exoplanet — a planet outwith our solar system.

Footprints show dreaded Tyrannosaurus Rex moved in packs

Research published online Wednesday on the Tyrannosaurus Rex, a ruler of parts of North America 70 million years ago, suggests the creatures hunted in packs. They and cousins, such as the Albertosaurus, were the day's version of armed and dangerous.

Massive sinkhole opens up in Florida neighborhood

Residents of a neighborhood in Spring Hill, a Tampa suburb about 50 miles north of Clearwater, Florida got the surprise of their lives late Saturday when a massive sinkhole began opening up at the intersection of Eldridge Road and Van Allen Way.

Astronaut takes photo of IDF & Hamas rocket warfare from space

The serenity and awe that usually accompanies photos taken in space has been replaced by horror and awe as man’s ability to capture earth from space now captures the war and conflict in the Gaza Strip.

Scientists discover that mammoths and mastodons were homebodies

According to new research from the University of Cincinnati mastodons and mammoths loved to hang out in the area. Areas of Cincinnati reportedly played host to these huge creatures all year.

Stress, not weather erosion, architect of sandstone formations

A new study by Czechoslovakian researchers has "convincingly" shown how mother nature creates the intricate carvings in sandstone formations.

UN predicts AIDS might be manageable by 2030

AIDS could be a manageable condition by 2030, according to a new report made by the United Nations (U.N.). This is based on drops both in the global levels of new HIV infection cases and AIDS-related fatalities.

Largest aquatic flying insect discovered in Sichuan, China

Many of the largest bugs in the world have a new competitor; the Giant Dobsonfly. Townsfolk brought the creature to researchers and it is now making international news.

Broad Institute's groundbreaking announcement on psychiatric research Promoted

On Tuesday, July 22, at 10 a.m. ET the Broad Institute and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research delivered a groundbreaking announcement about psychiatric research research.

How empires and religions arise from war

A new model developed at the University of Connecticut determines that wars cause social institutions to rise using big data and research models.

Gorillas use scent to communicate with others

Gorillas use the emission of an odor to communicate, a new study finds. Odor changes based on the relationship of the animal putting out that scent and the one smelling it can signal different emotions.

Newly researched substance can trap dangerous gases

A new compound developed by scientists at the DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. According to early reports it has some significant value in trapping gases such as xenon, krypton, and radon.

Oceans crucial as search for alien life gathers pace

New research published Monday on the role of oceans could help determine whether other planets outwith our solar system are capable of developing and sustaining life.

Scientists find a way to block botulism poisoning

Scientists have discovered how bacterial toxins that cause food-borne botulism are absorbed through the intestinal lining and into the bloodstream. The study offers insight into developing new approaches for blocking this poisonous substance.

Genetic cause of common breast tumors in women

Singapore scientists have discovered the genetic cause of common breast tumors in women. The study was led by researchers from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School.

Using eyes and nose to detect Alzheimer’s

Failing a sniff test or screening positive on an eye exam may predict people’s chances of developing the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer’s, according to a new study.

European human brain project officials respond to criticisms

Officials behind the European brain mapping effort have taken steps to tackle concerns voiced about the project from the scientific community.

Many science graduates end up not working in science

A new report finds that most science, technology, engineering, and math degree-holders seek jobs unrelated to their academic disciplines. However, students of these subjects have a higher chance of securing employment that other disciplines.

Can stem cells be used to treat autism?

Duke University is launching a $41 million stem-cell trial to explore the use of umbilical cord blood cells to treat autism, stroke, cerebral palsy, and related brain disorders.

U.S. government seeks to increase biosecurity

After a several incidents leading to laboratory closures and a moratorium on the transfer of dangerous biological agents, U.S. labs are reassessing safety threats.

Is there a genetics of 'friendship'?

A new study suggests that people tend to choose friends who share their genes. The inference is that humans tend to associate with other people who are very similar to themselves. Not all biologists agree.
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