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science Articles
New research reveals that five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

Breast cancer rates lower among Latina women

A genome-wide association study has identified that a specific gene could help explain the relatively low rates of breast cancer among Latina women.

Can electromagnets 're-program' cells?

Scientists have reported that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming. Not all scientists are convinced.

Keeping rice arsenic free

Scientists have identified a transporter protein in rice that shifts arsenic in to vacuoles. This mechanism helps to prevent the toxic element from traveling into grains.

Oldest human genome sequenced

A 45,000 year-old bone has been sequenced. This is the oldest human genome yet to have been sequenced. The bone came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

Doctors treating more drug-resistant patients: Study

More patients in the United States are coming down with drug-resistant bacterial infections because of overuse and over-prescription of antibiotics in humans and animals.

Lab creates coldest air in the universe

A laboratory has created the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The air was developed in Italy and was verified using instruments designed by Yale University.

Easter Islanders also made voyages to the New World

Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, is one of the world's most remote inhabited islands. The closest continental land mass is Chile, 2,182 miles away. Yet, science has proven the Rapa Nui people met with early South Americans, well before Europeans came visiting.

Humans genetically engineered to become super intelligent could have an IQ of 1000

Genetically engineered human beings could have IQs of 1000 or higher. At least that's the theory from scientist Stephen Hsu.

Black holes acting as stopcocks shutting off new star formation

Massive black holes at the centre of older galaxies operate as a brake on the formation of new stars, a study has found.

Plant grown treatment for pulmonary hypertension

People suffering with pulmonary hypertension have few treatment options. However, a novel therapy, that has been trialled in animals, has the potential to be an effective therapy.

Notebook found in Antarctica is an unexpected treasure to science Special

While some speculate there might be diamonds in the Kimberlite rock found in some of the mountains of Antarctica, conservation teams at the Antarctic Heritage Trust of New Zealand continue to uncover rare treasures of their own.

Study: Shape of person's face indication of aggression, dominance

Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that the shape of a person's face can determine how domineering and aggressive they are.

Two families of comets found orbiting nearby star

Such has been the huge advances in the field of space telescopes in recent years that astronomers are now turning their attention to comets in orbit around stars other than our Sun.

Solar flares might increase, disrupting communication

Communications on Earth might be disrupted and Northern Lights could intensify if solar flares increase as some scientists expect.

How to watch this week's incredible solar eclipse

A partial solar eclipse, like the one happening this Thursday, will not be visible from across the entire US again until the year 2023. Since the next one is nearly a decade away, you'll want to get the most out of this one.

Jerusalem stone will help explain Bar Kokhba revolt

On Tuesday, Israeli archaeologists announced the discovery of a large stone bearing Latin inscriptions that appears to give credence to the reasons behind the Bar Kochba revolt in the second century A.D. against Roman rule.

Paralyzed man walks again

A remarkable story: a paralyzed Bulgarian man called Darek Fidyka is walking again after novel treatment by doctors. The treatment consisted of implanted regenerative cells.

Computer design helps build new antibiotics

Technologists and biologists have combined resources to use computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics. This combination approach could lead to the development of a new generation of drugs.

Not just sci-fi, long-range tractor beam now a reality

Two Australian laser physicists have developed the world's first first long-distance optical tractor beam, capable of not only attracting objects, but repelling them as well.

Op-Ed: Sex invented in Scottish lake? Well, where else?

Two armoured fish called Microbrachius dicki are believed to be the pioneers of sex, 385 million years ago. The fish used a side-on position to mate, breaking with a long tradition of somewhat impersonal spawning.

Study of zebrafish helps boy with rare disease

A study into zebrafish has helped identify the cause of an unknown genetic disorder affecting a boy and two of his uncles. Although no cure is imminent, the study could pave the way to alternative approaches for dealing with rare genetic diseases.

Sonic microchips could monitor the body’s health

Scientists have an idea that involves planting tiny electronic devices deep inside the body in order to monitor health and deliver selective therapies to treat specific illnesses.

World's deadliest spider shows up in family's groceries

A family in South London has been "deeply traumatized" after the father discovered a deadly spider while unpacking the family's groceries. The spider, called the Brazilian wandering spider, or Banana spider is the world's most venomous arachnid.

Marijuana-based epilepsy drug 'promising'

In a new U.S. study, children with treatment-resistant epilepsy have been prescribed a cannabidiol drug in clinical trials.

NASA discovers tiny galaxy some 13 billion lightyears from Earth

With the help of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered one of the farthest and smallest galaxies ever seen.

Op-Ed: Hey, MIT — What about success on Mars?

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology study of the Mars One project has come up with a few very interesting, but debatable figures and options. There's a bit more to this issue than the usual obituary for human hopes, this time.

Space station 'same day delivery' service operational by 2016

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station will soon have their own same day delivery service, courtesy of the soon to be developed Terrestrial Return Vehicle.

To die on Mars is not an option despite MIT's study

There has been a lot of media attention over the Mars One mission to colonize Mars in 2025 using known and available technology. That very technology may very well prove to be the undoing of the project.

Op-Ed: Has Alzheimer’s been recreated in a stem cell lab study?

According to a newly published report, scientists have used a novel three-dimensional culture method to recreate the plaques and tangles of the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer’s.

Op-Ed: Do stem cells offer diabetes cure potential?

Scientists have developed hormone-producing pancreas cells from human embryonic stem cells. This could pave the way for a cell therapy to treat diabetes.

Can broccoli extract ease autism symptoms?

An initial study has found improvements in behavior and communication skills among young men treated with sulforaphane. This chemical is a constituent of vegetables like broccoli.

Yogurt can be used detect diseases like cancer

A new study has shown that nanoparticle-producing bacteria have the ability to simplify the diagnosis of cancer and other medical conditions. These bacteria take the form of a "high tech" yogurt.

New clues about learning and neurons

To learn how to run on a wheel with unevenly spaced rungs, mice must be able to make new myelin, the fatty sheaths that insulate neuronal axons. This finding changes some perceptions on how animals learn.

How pelvic muscles help delay urination

Needing to pee is an uncomfortable experience. There is a reason why we are (mostly) able to control urination. Scientists have revealed neural underpinnings of the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which help us delay urination.

Magnetic tornadoes could trigger new types of computers

Scientists are investigating whether magnetic devices, hundreds of times thinner than a human hair, can be utilized to create next generation computing technologies.

Super batteries charge in two minutes and last 20 years

A group of technologists have created a remarkable new battery: the battery can be charged up within two minutes and, once fully charged, power on for up to 20 years.

Switching algae on and off may help with cancer and biofuels

Scientists have found a way to switch certain cells on and off – a type of “cellular snooze button”. Knowing this could potentially help researchers improve biofuel production and cancer detection.

Graphene helps with personalized medicine

Control over DNA is one of the steps toward personalized medicines. One means to achieve this is through graphene, where a positive charge applied to a graphene nanopore can accelerate DNA movement and a negative charge can stops DNA in its tracks.

Review: BBC's Human Universe asks the question: Why are we here? Special

Each one of us is made from matter, so what unites every person living on our planet and how did we get to be here and exist. Professor Brian Cox attempts to explain in his BBC documentary, the Human Planet.

British archaeologists discover rare Iron-Age decorated chariot

It turned out to be the find of a lifetime for a team of archaeologists from the University of Leicestershire. During an ongoing excavation at Burrough Hill Iron Age hill fort, near Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire, an Iron-Age chariot was unearthed.

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