http://www.digitaljournal.com/life/health/inflammatory-syndrome-linked-to-covid-19-found-in-young-adults/article/572087

Inflammatory syndrome linked to COVID-19 found in young adults

Posted May 22, 2020 by Karen Graham
Doctors are beginning to see the mysterious coronavirus-linked inflammatory syndrome thought to be restricted to children and young adolescents, in adults in their early 20s, according to news reports.
Scientists around the world are working at breakneck speed to develop a vaccine for COVID-19
Scientists around the world are working at breakneck speed to develop a vaccine for COVID-19
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS, AFP/File
According to the Washington Post, this latest information is more worrisome. Jennifer Lighter, a doctor at New York City's Langone Medical Center says that while younger children seem to experience symptoms of Kawaski disease, including inflammation of the blood vessels, teens and young adults are experiencing a "more severe" and "overwhelming" response that involves the heart and other organs.
Just recently, at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego, California, a 20-year-old presented with the inflammatory syndrome, while a 25-year-old was diagnosed at Northwell Health’s Long Island Jewish Medical Center and several patients in their early 20s were hospitalized with the syndrome at NYU Langone, reports The Hill.
This latest information has come out in response to an emergency advisory issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that asks health care providers "to report any patient who meets the case definition to local, state, and territorial health departments to enhance knowledge of risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment of this inflammatory syndrome."
In New York, while the number of cases of coronavirus has continued to decrease, the number of children and young adults with the Kawasaki-like syndrome has continued to rise. As of Thursday, New York City has reported 147 children with the condition.
The cases presenting today differ slightly from the inflammatory syndrome first seen in March and April. Then, youngsters were found to have preexisting conditions, active coronavirus infections, and trouble breathing.
The patients showing up in emergency rooms today are young adults and older children who suddenly develop fever, abdominal pain and/or nausea and vomiting and rashes that can be signs of more serious problems.