http://www.digitaljournal.com/technology/samsung-oppo-sued-in-china-over-intrusive-smartphone-bloatware/article/437387

Samsung, Oppo sued in China over intrusive smartphone bloatware

Posted Jul 3, 2015 by James Walker
Smartphone manufacturers Samsung and Oppo have found themselves faced with a lawsuit from their customers in China. The consumer commission is fed up with the massive amounts of bloatware apps installed out of the box, some of which may be intrusive.
Samsung Galaxy Note 3
Samsung Galaxy Note 3
Phonearena
The case specifically targets the South Korean Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and the Chinese Oppo Find 7, according to PhoneArena. It is being handled by the Shanghai Consumer Rights Protection Commission which found that the Find 7 has an incredible 71 non-removable apps installed out of the box. The Galaxy Note 3 has 44.
The commission wants the companies to indicate more clearly exactly which apps come with their phones and what their purpose is. Additionally, it argues the manufacturers should detail how much memory the apps use up and make them removable.
Android phone manufacturers are well-known for their extensive interface customisations. They have acquired a bad name for often lowering performance and including reams of non-removable apps that use up the owner's disk space while often not adding any desired functionality.
The companies are typically paid to include the bloatware apps. An app developer can get some easy publicity if their product is installed out of the box on a flagship smartphone but it appears as though manufacturers are taking this too far by including over 70 non-removable third-party apps on a new phone.
Of particular interest is the commission's allegation that some of the preinstalled apps on the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and Oppo Find 7 may be capable of stealing a user's data. This has not been confirmed though and it is unknown what apps the commission is referring to.
Oppo and Samsung now have two weeks to come up with a defence for their actions. A trial date will be announced afterwards. The case represents another stand in the growing consumer fight against enforced smartphone bloatware.