http://www.digitaljournal.com/life/health/op-ed-losing-the-war-against-obesity-with-babble-and-bull/article/416440

Op-Ed: Losing the war against obesity with bickering and bull

Posted Nov 21, 2014 by Paul Wallis
A combination of “issues” with body image, obesity, and truly grotesque nutritional issues are costing a fantastic amount of money. The health impact is colossal and no progress is being made in solving any of these issues.
Obese children are far less likely to finish school than peers of normal weight  according to Europe...
Obese children are far less likely to finish school than peers of normal weight, according to European research
Francois Guillot, AFP/File
This is now a critical mass problem — 30 percent of the world’s population is obese. Simultaneously, a truly unhealthy “norm” is being advocated. “Real women” are defensively depicted as “not supermodels.” Sadly, that can also mean “normal according to averages,” and average now means fat for a terrifyingly large number of people.
According to McKinsey Global Institute, that’s 2.1 billion people. The prediction is that half of the world’s population will be overweight by 2030. It may be that this figure is a tipping point, as if 30 percent isn’t bad enough.
Confusing the issue about obesity -The babble about body image
There’s a current controversy about Victoria’s Secret, that hive of sensitivity to public misery, which has been under fire for depicting its “angels” as ultra-slim. The fact that the “angels” aren’t made in the image of the lowest common denominator is the basis for the criticism.
Victoria’s Secret hasn’t done itself or anyone else any favors with its response to criticism. The new campaign, A Perfect Body, was replaced with a reworked slogan, A Body for Every Body — and the same models in the picture. A great message for young girls, O mighty trash writers.
Victoria’s Secret isn’t alone. The fashion industry generally is famous for its incredible lack of interest in anything resembling a healthy body image for women. The men seem to be more or less well fed, unlike the pathetic skeletons and dead-faced corpses of the young female models. (Male obesity has been a norm for decades. Slob Rule, in fact, thanks to TV.)
A trillion-dollar industry with the social values of a broken sewer should surprise nobody. There are so many. The usual expectation for members of the human race would be some sort of understanding of the issues, but not with the Fash Trash. Everybody knows the vacuous, subhuman executive airheads of the rag trade need spreadsheets to find out whether they’re alive. If they’re not exploiting Cambodians or Bangladeshis, they think there’s something wrong.
The trouble is that the fashion industry is a business. Expecting businesses to act in a socially responsible way is quite unrealistic. These guys are trained to be jerks, and that’s what they do. Expecting the criminals to solve the body image crime wave against women is pretty absurd.
The PC brigades aren’t doing much useful, either. They’re not creating a working body image model for younger women. “Normal” is now an excuse for being unhealthy. This is a lethal situation, and no effective guidance is being given.
The damage being done is that the conflict of images is delivering an absurdly mixed, confusing message. Healthy is the right message. Neither the PC verb-benders refusing to define a healthy image nor the fashion crap-worshippers with their Photo shopped heroines are clarifying that message.
The food industry – Mass murder with appetizers
Here, we get in to the complex side of obesity. Elsewhere in the equations of obesity, the endless supply of sugar and starches is poisoning the human species quite effectively. After decades of howls from dieticians, doctors, and anybody else with a clue, what’s been done? Absolutely nothing, in terms of stopping the plague of obesity.
The food industry is now effectively a mass producer of poisons. The seemingly endless health risks of this global diet of toxic fluff have been stated so often and the garbage is still being mass produced. There’s no point in belaboring this well-known point, but the current equation of $2 trillion in costs quantifies the problem.
People are paying for the things that are literally killing them, and paying for the health care that doesn’t save them. The society also pays collectively for the strain on services. (You don’t dodge the costs of demand for health services just because you’re comparatively healthy. Forget the theory that everyone pays their own way. If demand is high, everyone loses.)
The obesity meltdown
The obesity plague is a festering Chernobyl for current and future generations. This is “social obesity,” affecting not only the sufferers, but everyone associated with them directly. Indirectly, the entire society now has a more or less 30% core liability built in to it. The stories about obesity are endless, and they’re all bad.
It may or may not be a coincidence that human fertility, particularly fertility, has been crashing in recent years as the obesity epidemic has risen. The entire modern food chain, in fact, has many identified health risks. Some chemicals like glyphosate, now used in the food chain can inhibit the actions of amino acids, a very serious development, and just one of many in recent years. Sweeteners are causing pathological conditions, “corrupting” gut flora and causing sugar intolerance.
Total failure, again?
The seemingly endless saga of failures to address any health problems at all does have an end point. At some stage, the failures will crash the system. The Living Dead of the last few generations, the depressed, the impotent, the flabby, the unfit and the infertile are becoming the norms.
Total lack of comprehension of any form of responsibility is pretty normal for most industries. The mere fact that their products will effectively exterminate the human species isn’t something industry “leaders” appear to consider a subject worthy of discussion.
Political “leaders” are apparently incapable of managing any issues at all. Generally, they refuse to even consider health a significant issue. If they did, billions of extremely sick people might not be sick.
The questions are:
1. When is the unhealthy crap going off the shelves?
2. When do governments start earning their keep and enforcing healthy food production methods?
3. When do corporations get held accountable for their poisons?
4. When do consumers wise up and start consciously dodging the bullets?
5. When do scientists and doctors condescend to start solving well-known massive problems?
The point is this — there’s no future in failure, and failure is all that’s happening now. These multiple disasters in human health, and they are real global disasters, as bad as any war, won’t just go away. Future generations are being poisoned in the womb. This is the creeping disaster where humanity may not get up again.
Take it seriously, or take the consequences.