http://www.digitaljournal.com/a-and-e/entertainment/superman-debut-comicbook-sells-for-record-3-2-million/article/399464

Superman-debut comic book sells for record $3.2 million

Posted Aug 26, 2014 by Mike White
A nearly flawless and extremely rare edition of the first Superman comic has sold for a record $3.2 million. There are only about 50 of the debut comics still left.
Cover of Action Comics #1  a comic book which recently sold for $3.2 million
Cover of Action Comics #1, a comic book which recently sold for $3.2 million
DC Comics
The BBC reported eBay stated the price for the sale was a record for any comic book. Reportedly, the comic which was purchased was one of the best preserved of the debut Superman comics.
New York dealers Metropolis Comics purchased the Superman issue. The previous record for the sale for a comic was for the same issue in 2011 of $2.16 million.
Certified Guaranty Company gave the purchased copy, which has white pages, a nine out of ten rating for the condition of the debut comic.
The first edition had been stored in a cedar chest in a home in West Virginia after it was purchased, said seller Darren Adams.
When the owner died, the family sold it to a dealer in the early 1980s. Adams, who operates the Pristine Comics shop in Washington state, then purchased it.
Stephen Fishler of Metropolis Comics explained to the Associated Press that purchasing the Superman original was "just too good of an opportunity to pass up."
"It's hard to believe that a kid's 10 cent comic could be worth that much money, but it is Superman," Fishler added.
"That's an iconic thing. It's the first time anybody saw what a superhero was like."
Yahoo News reported the first edition was created by Cleveland teenagers Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. In Action Comics Number one, Superman's story of being from Krypton, his role as reporter Clark Kent and his identity as a champion of the oppressed are all introduced.
"I actually held it for a few years – I was so excited about this book," Adams explained, according to the Guardian. "Most books have a history … but this book was totally off the grid, and nobody knew about it till I made it known."