http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/350154

'Second Acts' editorial series celebrates life-pivots on Slate

Posted May 14, 2013 by Michael Krebs
F Scott Fitzgerald said 'There are no second acts in American lives,' and a crowd-sourcing and editorial series from Slate is seeking to debunk the famous Fitzgerald position.
Not many Canadians are planning to save up for retirement  according to a recent BMO survey.
Not many Canadians are planning to save up for retirement, according to a recent BMO survey.
Morgue File
Generations of Americans have given themselves to one cause, living day-in and day-out through the narrow prism of perspectives shaped from a somewhat singular experience and ending their days in the echo of the famous F. Scott Fitzgerald position that "there are no second acts in American lives."
Thankfully, it appears that the American "baby-boomer" generation is rejecting Fitzgerald's rather depressing assertion - and this rejection is the subject of a celebratory crowd-sourcing and editorial series from Slate magazine, the Washington Post Company's online thought leadership property.
The Second Acts hive, Slate's crowd-sourcing platform, introduced the Second Acts editorial series in the audience request posed on Tuesday by Slate's Editor-in-Chief, David Plotz: "Tell us a story about how you started over."
This is what the second act is about: starting over with a pivot in a completely different direction and defying the old-school thinking that one career defines a lifetime. The nature of the second act re-defines the nature of retirement - moving from the notion of stagnation and stoicism to the prospect of living through a new vision.
Slate kicked off the Second Acts editorial series with a profile of Ina Garten, providing an analysis of how she transformed from a nuclear policy analyst to the Barefoot Contessa, one of the most popular chefs in American culture.
Slate's Second Acts series will span across ten profiles and will include four videos in conjunction with the hive program.