http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/342067

Transgender girl writes response to Obama inaugural address

Posted Jan 24, 2013 by Brett Wilkins
A young transgender girl who transitioned from male to female when she was in kindergarten has written to President Obama seeking recognition for her people.
Gay rights advocates were positively ecstatic when Barack Obama became the first president ever to mention "our gay brothers and sisters" in an inaugural address. He also drew widespread applause for recognizing the 1969 Stonewall uprising as a pivotal moment in US civil rights history.
But 11-year-old Sadie Croft, a transgender girl from Arizona, wondered why Obama didn't mention trans people too. Sadie decided to write down her thoughts in the wake of the president's inaugural address, an eloquent essay in which she expresses the need for greater understanding and support for transgender Americans like herself.
Here's "Sadie's Dream for the World," originally published on TransGriot.
The world would be a better place if everyone had the right to be themselves, including people who have a creative gender identity and expression. Transgender people are not allowed the freedom to do things everyone else does, like go to the doctor, go to school, get a job, and even make friends.
Transgender kids like me are not allowed to go to most schools because the teachers think we are different from everyone else. The schools get afraid of how they will talk with the other kids' parents, and transgender kids are kept secret or told not to come there anymore. Kids are told not to be friends with transgender kids, which makes us very lonely and sad.
When they grow up, transgender adults have a hard time getting a job because the boss thinks the customers will be scared away. Doctors are afraid of treating transgender patients because they don't know how to take care of them, and some doctors really don't want to help them. Transgender patients like me travel to other states to see a good doctor.
It would be a better world if everyone knew that transgender people have the same hopes and dreams as everyone else. We like to make friends and want to go to school. Transgender people want to get good jobs and go to the doctors like they are exactly the same. It really isn't that hard to like transgender people because we are like everyone else.
Sadie, who socially transitioned when she was in kindergarten, was home-schooled for years but is now attending the fifth grade at a public school. She is a vegan and is into environmentalism, reading, swimming, basketball and, of course, texting her girlfriends. She loves Lady Gaga, Pink and Justin Bieber and wants to work for Greenpeace and be a mother when she grows up.
Unfortunately, Sadie is no stranger to discrimination, but her mother, Logan Sage Croft, told the Huffington Post that she "isn't shy or ashamed of who she is."
"I'm always 'on' when we go out because I never know when she'll strike up a conversation with the person in front of her in line at Trader Joe's," her mom added. "When she chats with people, she introduces herself as, 'Hi, I'm Sadie, my favorite color is pink, I'm vegan and I'm transgender. Who are you?'"